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Viewing: BIO 325 : Paleontological Field Methods

Last approved: Wed, 01 Jun 2016 08:18:21 GMT

Last edit: Fri, 27 May 2016 18:00:17 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
Major
BIO (Biological Sciences)
325
032340
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Paleontological Field Methods
Paleontological Field Methods
College of Sciences
Biological Sciences (17BSC)
Term Offering
Summer Only
Offered Every Year
Summer 2 2016
Previously taught as Special Topics?
Yes
2
 
Course Prefix/NumberSemester/Term OfferedEnrollment
BIO 495Summer 20154
BIO 495 / ZO 631Summer 20144
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)
Remote Location/Site Based
research field site in Utah
Grading Method
Letter Grade Only
4
5
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture and Lab8
Field Work18
Course Attribute(s)


If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Lindsay Zanno
Assistant Research Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture and Lab1212Nono comment
Field Work1212Nofield work in Utah (part of the course -- this is the same 12 students as in the lecture/lab component)
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Delivery FormatPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
FWK00NoN/A -- neither DELTA nor online
Prerequisite: BIO 120 or BIO 181 or BIO 330
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
17BIOSCBSBiological SciencesElective
17BIOBABA in Biological SciencesElective
17ZOOBSZoologyElective
Understanding the history of life is not possible without first and foremost unearthing it. Discovering, collecting, and conserving fossil specimens for research is a time- and labor-intensive endeavor that requires hands-on training in the field. This course provides introductions to the evolution of life; Mesozoic biodiversity, biostratigraphy, and biogeography; vertebrate skeletal anatomy; stratigraphic and sedimentary concepts; and geomorphology. The course also covers paleontological research methods, including: specimen data collection, conservation, and preparation; topographic and geologic maps; GPS techniques; prospecting and excavation of fossil localities; and taphonomic indicators. Field work in Utah; additional costs involved.

Upon joining NC State in a joint position with the NC Museum of Natural Sciences, Dr. Zanno created the proposed course-based undergraduate research experience for students interested in paleontology, an area in which we do not yet offer a lot of course options.  In developing this course, Dr. Zanno and Dr. Lubischer spoke with colleagues in MEAS about how best to structure the course based on their experience in offering MEA 465 Geologic Field Camp -- with different content, but a similar conceptual approach to the hands-on teaching of field research techniques. 


In short, the proposed course, Paleontological Field Methods, will provide a unique and valuable opportunity at NC State for students who dig paleontology.


Yes
The field work in Utah involves expenses related to travel and supplies. The major cost is for travel to Utah (est. $650 airfare), with additional costs related to supplies (typically no more than $200).
Is this a GEP Course?
No
GEP Categories

Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 

 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 

 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 

 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 

Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 

 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

No new resources are requested. Dr. Zanno will teach this course as part of her regular responsibilities.

Understanding the history of life would not be possible without first and foremost unearthing it.  Discovering, collecting, and conserving fossil specimens for research is a time- and labor-intensive endeavor that requires hands-on training in the field.  The goal of this course is to provide this training and an introduction to key concepts in paleontological research.


Student Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, students will be able to do the following.



  • Explain fundamental stratigraphic and sedimentological concepts

  • Identify the name and anatomical position of vertebrate skeletal material

  • Describe key concepts in the North American dinosaur evolution

  • Read geologic and topographic maps

  • Identify and classify types of data collected from fossil material in situ including 3D quarry mapping, taphonomic indicators, and archival record keeping for museum specimens

  • Use global positioning to collect field data

  • Demonstrate fossil preparation and collection methods

  • Interpret federal land use policy


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Quizzes20%Quizzes
Lab Report30%Graded labs
Other15%Field notebooks
Other15%Quarry data collection
Other20%Time and progress at the field research site
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Life in Deep Time: Principles of geology and time, evolution of life overview, Mesozoic biodiversity3 classessee the syllabus for details
Materials and Methods in Paleontology: Data collection, specimen handling, quarry protocol4 classes
Intro to vertebrate anatomy, principles of taphonomy, science communication, preparation for the field6 classes
Intensive field methods90 hours field workfield research
I calculated the contact hours per week over 5 weeks because this is a 5 week summer course. Do we need to convert that to what it would be over 15 weeks (i.e., divide by 3) or is this okay?
Key: 10165