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Viewing: CSC 455 : Social Computing

Last approved: Tue, 17 Oct 2017 08:02:26 GMT

Last edit: Mon, 28 Aug 2017 20:48:30 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
Major
CSC (Computer Science)
455
032386
Dual-Level Course
No
Cross-listed Course
No
Social Computing
Social Computing
College of Engineering
Computer Science (14CSC)
Term Offering
Fall Only
Offered Every Year
Fall 2016
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Hybrid (Online/Face to Face)

Grading Method
Letter Grade Only
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3
Course Attribute(s)


If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Munindar P Singh
Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture1515NoNone
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Delivery FormatPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
LEC1010NoNone
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
No
This course surveys the field of social computing, introducing its key concepts, paradigms, and techniques. Specific topics are selected from the following list: social media and social network analytics, sociological underpinnings, crowdsourcing and surveys, human computation, social mobilization, human decision making, voting theory, judgment aggregation, prediction markets, economic mechanisms, incentives, organizational modeling, argumentation, contracts, norms, mobility and social context, sociotechnical systems, and software engineering with and for social computing. This course incorporates ideas from diverse disciplines (including sociology, psychology, law, economics, political science, logic, statistics, philosophy, business) to provide essential background for future computer science careers in industry and research.

Social computing is a burgeoning area of computer science. Several students would benefit from studying it formally in a course, especially if they are interested in pursuing an industry career or research in developing social media applications, human-computer interaction, and crowdsourcing, among other fields.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
No
GEP Categories

Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 

 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 

 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 

 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 

Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 

 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

College(s)Contact NameStatement Summary
College of Humanities and Social SciencesTed GreensteinI consulted the Sociology DGP, Ted Greenstein, for CSC 555 in 2015. He has no concerns with the proposed course.
No additional resources are required. This course will now be part of the normal instructional load for the faculty member.

This course is a self-contained survey that provides the essential background for social computing. The course provides an introduction to the rich variety of social computing applications, some already popular and some emerging. It identifies the key concepts underlying such applications highlighting the main paradigms of social computing.


This course understands social computing in a broad sense. In this conception, people and organizations are social entities and social computing arises from the interplay between computing on the one hand and social relationships among social entities on the other hand. Specifically, this course considers how (1) social relationships and individual preferences can be modeled, represented, and reasoned about through computing technology and (2) how interactions among social entities can be incorporated into computations as a basis for solving problems. This course surveys the key paradigms exhibited by applications of social computing. It identifies concepts for modeling and realizing social computing applications.


Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to do the following.



  • Apply concepts of computational models underlying social computing

  • Carry out simple forms of social analytics, involving network and language models, applying existing analytic tools on social information.

  • Design and launch social computing applications, specifically those involving crowdsourcing or human computation.

  • Implement rich social computing models in social computing applications

  • Evaluate emerging social computing applications, concepts, and techniques in terms of key principles.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Multiple exams15Two take-home exams
Lab assignments12One programming assignment on social media analytics
Lab assignments11One programming assignment on crowdsourcing and human computation
Homework2Two short homeworks, simply as preparation for the two exams
Project35One semester-long project selected by students working individually or in teams with reports for proposal, design, and implementation of the project; considered part of the final in this course
Forum_post5Message-board participation
Discussion5For online students, instead of class discussion, I weigh the exams at 35%
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Introduction2Understanding social computing and sociology underpinnings
Social media and social network analytics5Computational methods drawn from graph theory
Privacy enhancing surveys1Methods from statistics that seek to improve participation
Human representation and reasoning2Cognitive biases and heuristics in logical and statistical reasoning
Human computation2Using people to compute; social mobilization; prediction markets
Economic concepts4Incentives; utility theory; Pareto optimality; auctions; markets; incentive compatibility
Human decision making1Cognitive biases and heuristics in economic reasoning; Prospect theory
Voting theory3Preferences; voting methods; Arrow's theorem
Judgment aggregation2Doctrinal paradox; Ostrogorski's paradox; discursive dilemma
Argumentation2Rational argumentation; Toulmin structure; formal argumentation
Norms2Norms and conventions; norm emergence; robustness and resilience
Sociotechnical systems2Modeling organizations; directed normative relationships; accountability
Please note the CSC 555 was approved in Fall 2015.
rouskas (Thu, 21 Apr 2016 15:50:30 GMT): Ted Greenstein reviewed the syllabus of CSC 555 in June 2015, and did not find any overlap with courses offered in Sociology: Theodore Greenstein <ted@ncsu.edu> To: George Rouskas <rouskas@ncsu.edu> Re: CSC Course on Social Computing Hi George, We don't see any problems with this course. By the way, would you mind if we offer a course entitled "Computational Sociology"? Just kidding. Best, Ted Greenstein Theodore N. Greenstein Professor of Sociology North Carolina State University Raleigh, NC 27695-8107 Personal webpage: http://faculty.chass.ncsu.edu/greenstein/
rouskas (Thu, 21 Apr 2016 15:53:33 GMT): Ted Greenstein reviewed CSC 555 in June 2015 and did not find any overlap with Sociology courses: Theodore Greenstein <ted@ncsu.edu> To: George Rouskas <rouskas@ncsu.edu> Re: CSC Course on Social Computing Hi George, We don't see any problems with this course. By the way, would you mind if we offer a course entitled "Computational Sociology"? Just kidding. Best, Ted Greenstein Theodore N. Greenstein Professor of Sociology North Carolina State University Raleigh, NC 27695-8107 Personal webpage: http://faculty.chass.ncsu.edu/greenstein/
reeves (Thu, 08 Sep 2016 20:02:03 GMT): The weighting for the exams should be 30%, not 15% - Melissa please make the change, doesn't need to go back to instructor.
lamarcus (Wed, 19 Oct 2016 20:15:32 GMT): Removed 555 component to move the course forward - information matches as needed with 555 and will manually merge after changes made in Peoplesoft under course ID 032250.
aeherget (Mon, 24 Oct 2016 13:17:51 GMT): AECHH: Uploading updated syllabus at instructor's request via email. 10/24/2016
Key: 10540