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Viewing: ENG 248 / AFS 248 : Survey of African-American Literature

Last approved: Fri, 09 Feb 2018 09:01:30 GMT

Last edit: Fri, 02 Feb 2018 17:32:00 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
Major
ENG (English)
248
000363
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
Yes
Course Prefix:
AFS
Survey of African-American Literature
Surv Afr-Amer Lit
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
English (16ENG)
Term Offering
Fall and Spring
Offered Every Year
Spring 2018
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Marc Dudley
Associate Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture3535Non/a
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote


Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16ENGBA-16LLTEnglish BA-LiteratureElective
16ENGLBAEnglish BAElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLCRWEnglish BA-Creative WritingElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLFLMEnglish BA-FilmElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLLWREnglish BA-Language, Writing, and RhetoricElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLTEDEnglish BA-Teacher EducationElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLMEnglish BA-MinorElective
African-American writing and its relationships to American culture and history. Covers such writers as Wheatley, Douglass, Chesnutt, Dunbar, DuBois, Hughes, Hurston, Wright, and Morrison.

This is a part of the GEP HUM Review. Already approved for USD.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Humanities
US Diversity
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
1. Engage with and come to appreciate the diversity of African American literature and its writers by interpreting a variety of genres from critical perspectives that illuminate the African American experience.
 
 
1. Critical essay.
Sample question: Based on your readings and on class discussion, you are to define the African
American “Vernacular tradition.” Begin with a proper definition of “The Vernacular.” Describe, in your own words, its primary elements/components, its several recurrent themes, its original principle forms, and as you understand it, its function in the African American literary/aesthetic tradition. Be sure to cite a specific work and/or author or two along the way to inform your discussion.
 
 
2. Analyze issues that define and shape African American literature and experience as it relates to the greater American experience.
 
 
2. Critical essay.
Sample question: Discuss the “Black Arts” or Black Aesthetic movement as it relates (or not) to the preceding movement of “Protest” as seen in someone like Richard Wright. In other words, how is the Black Arts/Aesthetic movement different from the era of Protest? Begin by defining the Black Arts movement and its primary characteristics and its ultimate objectives. Next, briefly discuss 2 (two) Black Arts authors and a representative work from each, being sure to make clear how these works exemplify the movement.
 
 
3. Make scholarly arguments about literature using reasons and ways of supporting those reasons that are appropriate to the field of study.
 
 
3. Critical essays.
Sample essay prompt: The slave narrative as a genre was dependent on several key themes to convey the experiences of this nation's first African Americans. These themes marked the beginning of a literary tradition and laid the foundation for literature that followed. These themes included: bondage, freedom, struggle, deprivation, despair, endurance, salvation, hope, ownership. The tradition began with texts by the likes of Frederic Douglass and Harriet Jacobs. Examine one paragraph/segment from one of the slave narratives we have encountered (either Douglass or Jacobs) and discuss how the segment is indicative, THEMATICALLY, of the narrative in its entirety. How does your author seem to define your chosen theme? How is your chosen segment thematically representative of what is explored throughout that narrative, and the slave narrative’s greater thematic tradition as you have come to understand it? Does your author's understanding of this theme change at all in the narrative as it progresses?
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 
1. Articulate the several ways in which culture and society help shape gender, racial, ethnic, and/or class identities and express how this is reflected in literature. Special attention will be paid to the racial and ethnic component.
 
 
1. Discuss the concept of “The Institution” and the role of the Institution in the fictional works by Walter Mosely OR Gloria Naylor. Be sure to draw on textual examples where appropriate as you make a case for the presence and influence of institutions in their respective worlds. In formulating your answer, be sure to define just what an institution is (giving concrete examples), its function in society in general, and its function in your chosen work.
 
 
2. Conduct critical research on the historical, social, political and/or economic forces that account for and/or produce diversity, equality and structured inequalities in the U.S.
 
 
2. Critical essay.
Sample essay: The concept of "Womanism" developed as a natural outgrowth of the Civil Rights Movement and of Feminism proper to account for both gender and racial disparities (and reactions to that disparity) in American society. The term “Womanism,” though coined fairly recently, could very well apply to several of the texts we’ve read this term, both old and new. Compare/contrast (you can compare, contrast, or both, as you see fit) the concept of “Womanism” as it applies to both Harriet Jacobs and Gloria Naylor, drawing on examples where appropriate. As you formulate your answer, be sure to consider all the relative components/tenets of “Womanism” or “Womanist” literature. In other words, define the concept before launching into a discussion. Then consider how each author engages the concept. How does each work fit within that narrative/ideological framework?
 
 
n/a
 
 
n/a
 
 
n/a
 
 
n/a
Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
N/A
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
N/A
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
None
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
N/A
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
Gates and McKay, Norton Anthology of African American Literature, Second or Third Edition
($64.00/48.30)

Gaines, Ernest. A Lesson Before Dying ($13.95)

Naylor, Gloria. The Women of Brewster Place($14.00)

General information essays/readings may be assigned from the internet and/or the library reserves.
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
African origins/Africans in America/African American Literary Art Vernacular Tradition pages 44-54, 64-68, 78-92, 3-16, 8-45

2nd Edition: Lucy Terry, p. 186-87; “Bars Fight”; Phyllis Wheatley, p. 213-216 and read “On Being Brought to Africa….” ”And “To His Excellency….” 3rd Edition: Volume I: Lucy Terry (“Bars”110-12); Phyllis Wheatley 137-141; “On Being Brought….” 143-144; “To His Excellency,” 149-150)

Introduction to the Slave Narrative: 2nd Edition, p. 151-162; Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, 385-452 (Chapters 1-6). 3rd Edition Vol 1, p 75-87; 326-35, 2nd Edition Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, p 411--448 (Chapters 7-End) 3rd Edition, Vol 1 Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, p 353--388 (Chapters 7-End)
Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl , Harriet Jacobs
2nd Edition, 279-315, 3rd Edition, Vol 1, 221-261, Incidents finish

Turn-of-the-Century Literature, 2nd Edition: Chesnutt, “The Goophered Grapevine,” 602-12; 3Rd Edition Vol 1: Chesnutt (580-91); “The Goophered Grapevine”, 2nd Edition: Paul Dunbar, p. 905- (read bio and “An Ante-Bellum Sermon,” “We Wear the Mask,” “Sympathy”).; 3rd Edition: Paul Dunbar, p. 894—(read bio and “An Ante-Bellum Sermon,” “We Wear the Mask,” “Sympathy”).

Introduction to the Harlem Renaissance, (2nd Ed. 953-62); 2nd Edition: 953-62; Hughes 1288-1295; “The Negro Speaks of Rivers,” “Mother to Son”, “Harlem,” “I, Too”; 3rd Edition, Vol 1: Hughes 1302-04; “The Negro Speaks of Rivers,” “Mother to Son,” “Harlem,” “I, Too; 2nd Edition: Hurston, 1019-22; “The Gilded Six Bits,” 1033-41 3rd Edition, Vol 1: Hurston, 1029-32; “The Gilded Six Bits,” 1043-50.

Introduction to the Protest Period: 2nd Edition 1355-68; Wright bio, 1399-1402; “Long Black Song,” 1419-36 3rd Edition, Vol 2 93-107; Wright bio, 119-25; ”Long Black Song” is not found in this edition—a copy will be provided to you 2nd Edition: Petry bio, 1496-97; “Like a Winding Sheet,” 1497-1504 3rd Edition: Petry bio, 167-68; “Like a Winding Sheet” is not found in the 3rd Ed—a copy will be provided to you.

The Black Arts Movement: 2nd Edition: 1831-50; Baraka, 1937-38, “Black Art” and “SOS” provided; Gil Scott Heron, “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised,” 81-82;3rd Edition Vol 1 533-561; Baraka, 660-65, “Black Art” and “SOS” provided; Gil Scott Heron, “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised, 38-40;2nd Edition: Nikki Giovanni, 2096; “Beautiful Black Men,” 2097-98; “Nikki-Rosa,“ 2098; Sonia Sanchez, 1963-64; “homecoming,” 1964; “Summer Words of a Sista Addict,” 19663rd Edition: Nikki Giovanni, 879-80; “Beautiful Black Men,” 881; “Nikki-Rosa,” 882; Sonia Sanchez, 708-10; “homecoming” 711-12.
Contemporary Literature; Gloria Naylor’s The Women of Brewster Place (“Mattie Michael”) Naylor continued (“Etta Mae Johnson”), Naylor continued (“The Two”)

Naylor Finish (“Kiswana Brown” and “Block Party”)

Walter Mosely, “Equal Opportunity,” (2nd Edition, 2624-35, 3rd Edition, 1369-1381)
Ernest Gaines novel
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
N/A
No new resources required. HUM review.

The primary goals of this course are to introduce students to the diversity of African American literature and its writers, to help students analyze issues that define and shape African American literature through close readings of texts, and to assist students in the development of critical thinking skills through analysis and contextualization. Additionally, this course is meant to enhance student vocabulary for critical consideration of fiction and poetry and to demonstrate the value of literary research as a desirable way to increase knowledge.


Student Learning Outcomes

Students will engage with and come to appreciate the diversity of African American literature and its writers. As such, they will interpret a variety of genres from critical perspectives that illuminate the African American experience. Students will analyze issues that define and shape African American literature and experience as it relates to the greater American experience.Make scholarly arguments about literature using reasons and ways of supporting those reasons that are appropriate to the field of study.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Participation10%This includes potential pop quizzes.
Major Paper10%This is first response paper (2-3 pages).
Must be in MLA Format.
Major Paper20%This is critical analysis paper (5-7 pages).
Must be in MLA Format.
Midterm30%This will be essay format.
Final Exam30%This will be essay format.

aeherget (Thu, 11 Jan 2018 14:11:12 GMT): AECHH: Uploading updated syllabus at faculty request via email (1/10/2018) and changing "immediate" to "primary" in the learning objectives based on friendly suggestions from UCCC 1/10/2018.
Key: 108