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Viewing: ARC 545 : Methods of Interpretation in Architectural History

Last approved: Sat, 01 Apr 2017 08:02:32 GMT

Last edit: Thu, 30 Mar 2017 17:54:48 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
Major
ARC (Architecture)
545
001004
Dual-Level Course
No
Cross-listed Course
No
Methods of Interpretation in Architectural History
Methods of Interpretation
College of Design
Architecture (12ARC)
Term Offering
Fall Only
Offered Alternate Years
Fall 2017
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded/Audit
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Seminar3
Course Attribute(s)


If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Burak Erdim
Assistant Professor of Architecture
full

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Seminar12N/ANoN/A
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Prerequisites: ARC 241 and ARC 242 and ARC 441 or equivalents

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
No
This seminar surveys the materials, methods, and texts of architectural history as an analytical discipline of the built environment. A broad selection of readings will trace the evolution of the discipline and will position architectural history in relation to such fields as architecture, art history, urban and social history, anthropology, literature, cultural studies, urban planning, and architectural theory. The course is restricted to graduate students and serves as one of the alternate required courses for the Concentration in the History and Theory of Architecture.

This course is one of the two alternate courses that serve as the required course for the concentration in the history and theory of architecture. Students can take either this course or the Architectural Theory course (ARC 540) in order to satisfy the required course prerequisite for the concentration in the history and theory of architecture. This course and the theory course will be offered in alternating academic years to give the students the option to take one or the other as their foundational history/theory course. For more information, please see the Proposal for the Concentration in the History and Theory of Architecture.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
GEP Categories

Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 

 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 

 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 

 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 

Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 

 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

This course will not impact the instructor's current teaching schedule.

Through a survey of the critical methods of analysis and interpretation utilized in seminal texts of architectural history, theory, and criticism, the course provides graduate students with skills to read, understand, and respond to the complex set of issues that are involved in the construction and transformation of the built environment.


Through readings, in-class discussion, presentations, and the development of a writing and research assignment, the course also builds research as well as critical reading and writing skills.


As a supplement to the required history/theory sequence, the course provides the tools for graduate students to bring their knowledge of how architecture history is written into the design studio as a powerful tool of interpretation and response.


Student Learning Outcomes

1. Define the discipline of architectural history as an analytical field from its origins to the present day.


2. Describe the methods of architectural history as a set of frameworks through which to comprehend and respond to the built environment.


3. Recognize the types of materials, evidence, argumentation, and approaches used in architectural history and examine how these have changed and evolved over time.


4. Demonstrate how the methods surveyed in the course can be applied to the construction of a research and analysis project.


5. Implement and assess research, writing, and oral presentation skills.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Attendance20%At the beginning of each meeting, each member of the seminar will contribute a question or issue derived from the readings. We will write these on the board and use them to help guide our discussion. Students are required to bring written notes and printed copies of the readings to class. Students will be asked to refer to specific pages and passages in the readings as they respond to these questions. Each student will also be assigned a week and a topic on which to provide a presentation, a two-page handout, relevant images, and begin the discussion. Instructions on the contents of the two-page hand-out will be provided at the beginning of the semester.
presentation30%Each student is required to provide a 20-minute in-class presentation on their topic.
Major Paper50%See attached syllabus
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Course IntroductionReview and discuss the Syllabus, the structure of the course, the reading material, and the assignments for the semester.
What is Architectural History?Discuss Readings:
Arnold, "Reading the past: what is architectural history?" 1-13.
E.H. Carr, "What is history?" Arnold, 14-23.
Hayden White, "Fictions of Factual Representation," Arnold, 24-34.
What is an Author?Readings:
Arnold, “The authority of the author: biography and the reconstruction of the canon,” 35-50.
Sir Howard Colvin, “Biographical Dictionary,” Arnold, 51-70.
Michel Foucault, “What is an author,” Arnold, 71-82.

History, Formalism, and IconograpyVisit the NC State Libraries, Special Collections

Discuss Readings:
H. Wölfflin, Principles of Art History, 1-29, 62-75, 115-26.
Howard Crane, “Ottoman Sultan’s Mosques: Icons of Imperial Legacy” The Ottoman City and its Parts: Urban Structure and Social Order 1991: 173-243
History and StyleReadings:
Arnold, “On Classical Ground: Histories of Style,” 83-108.
Sir John Summerson, “Architecture in Britain, 1530-1830,” Arnold, 109-121.
Nicos Hadjinicolaou, “Art History and Class Struggle,” 122-126.
Gottfried Semper, “The Problem of Historicism,”
Architectural History and Social TheoryDISCUSSION OF PROJECTS AND PROPOSALS

Readings:
Peter Burke, History and Social Theory, 1-115.
Howard S. Becker, Writing for Social Scientists: How to Start and Finish Your Thesis, Book, or Article [1986], chap 2: “Persona and Authority”
Marxism and Social HistoryPROJECT PROPOSALS DUE (500 word abstract + 2 images + bibliography (3 pages))

Readings:
Arnold, “A class performance: social histories of architecture,” 127-142.
Mark Girouard, Life in the English Country House,” Arnold, 143-163. Also see the book on reserve: Chapters 1, 7, 10.
E.H. Gombrich, “In search of cultural history,” Arnold 164-172.
Peter Burke, History and Social Theory, 116-171.
Architecture, Urban Sociology, and Cultural GeographyReadings:
Dell Upton, “The Master Street of the World: The Levee,” in Streets: Critical Perspectives on Public Space, edited by Zeynep Çelik, et. al. (UC Press, 1994), 277-288.
Carl Schorske, “Introduction,” “The Ringstrasse, Its Critics, and the Birth of Urban Modernism,” & “Politics in a New Key: An Austrian Trio,” in Fin-de-Siecle Vienna (New York: Vintage, 1981), pages TBA.
Structuralism and SemioticsReadings:
Dell Upton, “Signs Taken for Wonders” Visible Language 37 no.3, 2003, 332-350.
Terry Eagleton, Ch. 3 of Literary Theory, 91-126.
Henry Glassie, Folk Houses in Middle Virginia, pages TBA
Post-structuralism and PostmodernityReadings:
Eagleton, Literary Theory, ch. 4, 126-50.
Burke, “Postmodernity and Postmodernism,” 172-189.
Postcolonial HistoriesReadings:
Gülsüm Baydar, “Toward Postcolonial Openings: Rereading Sir Banister Fletcher’s ‘History of Architecture,” Assemblage, No. 35 (Apr. 1998), 6-17.
Arnold, “The illusion of inclusion: the guidebook and historic architecture,” 173-188.
Sir Nikolaus Pevsner, “The buildings of England,” 189-194.
Roland Barthes, “The Blue Guide,” 195-198.
Feminism and GenderReadings:

Arnold, “Reading Architectural Histories: the discourses of Gender,” 199-204.

Denise Scott Brown, “Sexism and the start system in architecture,” Arnold, 205-210.

Alice T. Friedman, “Planning and representation in the early modern country house,” Arnold, 211-218.

Belting, “Global Art and Minorities: A New Geography of Art History,” 62-73.
In-class PresentationsEach student provide in-class presentations of their projects. Guest critics and members of the class provide feedback to the work.
History of History in Schools of ArchitectureFINAL PROJECT DUE

Readings:
Kostof, “The Shape of Time at Yale, Circa 1960,” in The History of History, 123-135.
mlnosbis 2/21/2017: No overlapping courses. Syllabus needs item 14 from the Graduate Course Syllabus Checklist (general PRR statement). Everything else looks good.

pjharrie 2/28/17: Overall, I agree that everything looks good. The one thing I feel can be improved is the Course Objectives. It really reads more like a description of how the course fits into the curriculum rather than a designation of learning objectives.

ABGS Reviewer Comments:
-No comments or concerns.
berdim (Wed, 01 Mar 2017 21:06:04 GMT): I addressed both of the comments above. Please see the new syllabus for the PRR statement. I included the new course objectives in both the attached syllabus and on this document above.
mlnosbis (Fri, 24 Mar 2017 12:04:14 GMT): Rollback: Rollback to Chair for Admin Board agenda item
Key: 11262