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Viewing: HON 312 : Outbreak

Last approved: Tue, 01 Nov 2016 08:00:58 GMT

Last edit: Mon, 31 Oct 2016 17:44:41 GMT

Change Type
Major
HON (Honors)
312
032387
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Outbreak
Outbreak
Division of Academic and Student Affairs
Honors Program (24HON)
Term Offering
Fall, Spring and Summer
Offered Upon Demand
Spring 2017
Previously taught as Special Topics?
Yes
2
 
Course Prefix/NumberSemester/Term OfferedEnrollment
HON 296Fall 2015, Fall 201620
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Letter Grade Only
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Susan Carson
Associate Professor, Dept of Plant & Microbial Biology

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture2020NoN/A
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
No
Students will evaluate disease outbreaks from multiple different perspectives, including the biology of the infectious agent, clinical implications, and social/economic/political factors contributing to the spread of the disease or that were impacted by a major epidemic/pandemic. This course will be inquiry-guided. The instructor will not generally be "presenting material", but rather providing the structure in which students will be guided to investigate the issues from multiple perspectives through the use of case studies, primary and secondary literature, student-driven research and presentations, and concept mapping.

This course has been a very popular special topics Honors Seminar both semesters it was offered. Students in the University Honors Program will be able to use this course in fulfillment of their Honors Seminar requirement, and in fulfillment of the interdisciplinary perspectives GEP requirement.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Interdisciplinary Perspectives
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Students will evaluate disease outbreaks from multiple different perspectives, including the biology of the infectious agent, clinical implications, and social/economic/political factors that enabled the spread of the disease. They will distinguish between the methodologies to research an infectious agent from the methodologies to understand factors contributing to disease spread through communities and on a global scale, including societal perceptions of vaccination.
 
 
Students will form research teams for each disease (module) we study. Each individual group will focus on the disease from a different perspective (biological, clinical, social, historical, etc) for their presentation. Teams will be required to focus on a different aspect of disease for each module (i.e. the same team cannot always focus only on the biology of the disease – factors will rotate among teams) and will be required to utilize at least one source from primary literature. In addition, students will read and discuss instructor-selected primary literature from different disciplines.
 
 
Students will make authentic connections between microbiology and the social sciences.
 
 
Concept mapping – At the end of each module, students will create concept maps where they link all factors and perspectives about the disease. They will also write a reflection of their previous assumptions about the disease and how their perspective may have changed.
 
 
Students will investigate the intersection of disease biology and cultural/societal factors influencing disease spread.
 
 
The final project requires students to create educational material about their selected disease aimed toward a specific population. To do this, they will need to determine what the population needs to know about the disease and its spread, and will need to incorporate their understanding of cultural practices and beliefs that led to the spread (for example, ebola can be widely spread among families due to ritual burials in some African cultures; measles is spreading in the US because of a culture of scientifically ungrounded fears, avian influenza is more likely to emerge in some Asian cultures due to the practice of keeping and slaughtering poultry in open markets).

In addition to the final project, students will critically analyze the redacted paper by Andrew Wakefield that linked MMR vaccination to autism. Students will review data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that suggests that several new measles outbreaks have occurred due to reduced vaccination in response to the Wakefield paper. Finally, students will work with sociology professor, Dr. Wenjie Liao to design and implement a survey to examine public perceptions of the safety and efficacy of childhood vaccination. During this work, students will also learn about IRB and the ethics involved in using human research subjects.
 
 
Primarily microbiology and sociology.
 
 
Readings will include primary and secondary literature in both disciplines. Following student presentations and class discussion of the readings and presentations, students will do concept mapping activities to further explore relationships between the different perspectives. Students will also write short written reflections regularly in a reflective journal.
Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
0
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
This is an Honors Seminar, open only to students in the University Honors Program except by departmental permission.
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
No. This is true of all HON courses.
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
none.
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
none.
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
see syllabus
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
see syllabus
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
see syllabus
College(s)Contact NameStatement Summary
College of Humanities and Social SciencesDeanna Dannels and Troy CaseDetailed information is attached.
No new resources are necessary.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the course, students will:


select relevant sources of information pertaining to disease outbreak.


articulate research findings.


create concept maps that show the interconnectedness of all factors in disease outbreak to explore the intersection of disease biology and cultural/societal reasons for disease spread.


evaluate disease outbreaks from multiple perspectives, including the biology of the infectious agent, clinical implications, and social/economic/political factors that enabled the spread of the disease.


distinguish between the methodologies used to research an infectious agent from the methodologies used to study public perceptions of disease and public health.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Oral Presentation30%Three presentations about different diseases; each is 10%
presentation10%In a group of two to three students, you will raise three potential questions arising from the survey findings and give a short presentation on one.
Project20%Final creative project. This includes the work, itself, the annotated bibliography, and the presentation of the work.
Exam15%Final exam is a take-home due the last week of class. It will be made available early.
Participation10%This includes, but is not limited to, survey design, concept-mapping activities, case studies, and class discussions.
Other15%Written reflection on each segment in your reflective journal.

Key: 11688