Viewing: ENG 374 / : History of Film From 1940

Last approved: Sat, 09 Feb 2019 09:00:14 GMT

Last edit: Mon, 14 Jan 2019 21:07:45 GMT

Changes proposed by: jswarts

Formerly Known As: COM 374


Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
Minor
ENG (English)
374
003878
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
History of Film From 1940
History of Film From 1940
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
English (16ENG)
23.0101
English Language and Literature, General.
Term Offering
Spring Only
Offered Every Year
Spring 2019
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)


If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Ora Gelley
Associate Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture3535NoN/A
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16ENGLBAEnglish BAElective
16ENGLCRWEnglish - Creative Writing ConcentrationElective
16ENGLFLMEnglish - Film ConcentrationElective
16ENGLLWREnglish - Language, Writing, and Rhetoric ConcentrationElective
16ENGLTEDEnglish - Teacher Education ConcentrationElective
16FSMFilm MinorRequired
16ENGLMEnglish MinorElective
16ARTSTBAArts Studies - Film Studies ConcentrationElective
Technological developments and aesthetic movements that have shaped international cinema production from 1940 to the present. Evolution in camera movement, editing, sound, narrative form, and the documentary. Post-war Hollywood cinema and international film industries (both established and emerging) in historical, economic and cultural context.

GEP review for Visual and Performing Arts


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Global Knowledge
Visual & Performing Arts
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Students will identify and discuss the tensions and confluences between discourses of aesthetics and film form, nationalism, third world and postcolonial critique, and identity politics in cinema since 1940.
 
 
[Midterm Exam Question] Referring to arguments made by Ella Shohat and Robert Stam (in “Rewriting Colonial History,” Unthinking Eurocentrism, 1994) discuss at least three ways in which Gillo Pontecorvo’s Battle of Algiers (1965) grants the Algerian people “linguistic and cultural dignity.” How does the depiction of Arabs in this film run counter to the typical representation of Arabs in Western film and media? Try to be as specific as possible in your reference to specific narrative and formal techniques deployed in Battle of Algiers that invert Eurocentric focalizations typical of Western film and media.
 
 
Through a study of film structure and form, students will analyze how films since 1940 represent history and memory, racial, national, cultural or gender identity, and the political implications of those representations.
 
 
[Midterm Question] Gillo Pontecorvo’s Battle of Algiers (1965) is an example of what Ella Shohat and Robert Stam ( “Rewriting Colonial History,” Unthinking Eurocentrism, 1994) call “Third Worldist Film”, i.e., films which are revolutionary in both political and formal terms. This has to do with the idea that in re-writing history you need a new aesthetic form. How was the film revolutionary, both thematically and aesthetically/formally?
 
 
Students will apply their knowledge of film analysis to critically interpret and write about films from diverse cultural and national contexts, including, among others, Italian, British, French, Iranian, and International co-productions as well as Hollywood feature films.
 
 
Seven Beauties builds its story about WWII and the Holocaust around the chameleonlike character of Pasqualino. Consider the ways in which viewer identification with the main protagonist works in Seven Beauties. Some questions to consider: to what extent does our identification with Pasqualino change throughout the film? What does it mean to ask viewers to identify with a morally ambiguous character? Why might Wertmüller want to put the spectator in an uncomfortable position with respect to the character of Pasqualino? Is Pasqualino "redeemed" by the end of the film? Why or why not?
Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 
Students will analyze and compare representations of history and memory, racial, national, cultural or gender identity, and the political implications of those representations across diverse cultural and national contexts, including, among others: Italian, British, French, and international co-productions, as well as Hollywood feature films.
 
 
[Midterm Exam Question] Referring to arguments made by Ella Shohat and Robert Stam (in “Rewriting Colonial History,” Unthinking Eurocentrism, 1994) discuss at least three ways in which Gillo Pontecorvo’s Battle of Algiers (1965) grants the Algerian people “linguistic and cultural dignity.” How does the depiction of Arabs in this film run counter to the typical representation of Arabs in Western film and media? Try to be as specific as possible in your reference to specific narrative and formal techniques deployed in Battle of Algiers that invert Eurocentric focalizations typical of Western film and media.
 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 
Students will interpret filmic representations of history and memory, racial, national, cultural or gender identity, and the political implications as products of the diverse cultural, national, and historical contexts in which the films were produced and received.
 
 
[Midterm Exam Question]The Postwar Italian Neorealist movement in film (of which Vittorio De Sica's Bicycle Thieves [1948] was a part), as Robert Gordon argues, was born out of the specific material/historical/social conditions in Italy in the immediate postwar period. Describe at least three characteristics of Neorealism that we see in Bicycle Thieves, and discuss how each characteristic is related to the specific material/historical/social conditions of postwar Italy. You may also, in your answer, discuss the ways in which the tenets of Neorealism were in part born out of a rejection of the kinds of films (many of which were deemed to be what they contemptuously called "White Telephone Films") that were made in Italy during the war.
 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
n/a
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
n/a
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
Must have sophomore standing.
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
none
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
No required textbook; see syllabus for readings
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 



Student Learning Outcomes


Key: 1178
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