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Viewing: ANT 422 / ANT 522 : Forensic Anthropology Crime Scene Investigation Field Methods

Last approved: Wed, 07 Mar 2018 09:00:49 GMT

Last edit: Thu, 11 Jan 2018 19:34:49 GMT

Change Type
Major
ANT (Anthropology)
422
032545
Dual-Level Course
Yes
522
Cross-listed Course
No
Forensic Anthropology Crime Scene Investigation Field Methods
Crime Scene Field Methods
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Sociology (16SOC)
Term Offering
Summer Only
Offered Every Year
Spring 2018
Previously taught as Special Topics?
Yes
3
 
Course Prefix/NumberSemester/Term OfferedEnrollment
ANT 295 Maymester 2016 13
ANT 295 Maymester 2015 8
ANT 295 Maymester 2014 8
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
3
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture12.5
Course Attribute(s)


If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Dr. Chelsey Juarez
Assistant Professor
assoc

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture and Lab1515NoCourse can accommodate up to 21 students based on equipment available.
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote


Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16ANTBAAnthropology MajorElective
16AYMAnthropology MinorElective
Introduction to the most commonly utilized field and crime scene recovery methods for human remains including probing, gridding, mapping, excavation, and evidence collection. Students are responsible for transportation to the mock crime scene located on Centennial Campus. Students may not receive credit for both ANT 422 and ANT 522.

ANT 422/522 will fill a gap in the General Anthropology undergraduate and graduate curricula by providing a field school offering that teaches hands-on forensic anthropological field techniques.   This class is important because it will provide a tangible skill that both undergraduate and graduate students can apply to their research and job search.  There is no other course either within this department or at at the university that covers the same material. 


No

Is this a GEP Course?
No
GEP Categories

Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 

 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 

 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 

 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 

Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 

 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

College(s)Contact NameStatement Summary
College of SciencesJohn Blondin The College of Sciences supports the creation of ANT 422.
This course is already listed as an elective course (pending approval) in the Forensic Science minor in the Department of Biological Sciences and will be an important component of that program.
No new resources are required for this course, as it is only offered in the summer and is therefore not part of the instructor's regular courseload. During the Maymester pilot years 2014, 2015 the course received an equipment grant to purchase needed equipment for 21 students for the course.

If you have ever considered a career in forensic anthropology or crime scene investigation, you might find yourself pondering the following questions:



  • What is the value of forensic anthropological perspective to crime scene investigation?

  • How do forensic anthropologists identify fragmentary human bone from animal or non-bone?

  • What is the proper way to conduct an investigation for human remains that are hidden or buried?

  • How do you know if human remains are of forensic significance? What do you do if they are not?

  • What are all the components of running a successful investigation from beginning to end?

  • What are the ethical considerations to crime scene investigation?


This course will prepare you to answer these questions and provide an opportunity to conduct best practice of forensic anthropological crime scene investigation methods. We will discuss the techniques forensic anthropologists use to locate and examine clandestine burials, surface scatters and crime scenes involving search and recovery. As well as the theoretical underpinnings that guide the development of forensic anthropological research and the interpretation of data, and the practical challenges and ethical obligations of forensic anthropological recovery and research.  We will approach specific questions in human osteology and recovery technique, by reviewing both human and non-human bone from adjudicated cases and grounding our recovery technique in archaeological methods. 


Student Learning Outcomes

Students will be able to:

1. Complete a North South line, traditional-gridded excavation, and triangulation.

2. Determine the best method of excavation to use based on time and crime scene situation.

3. Learn how to locate clandestine burials and determine which techniques are best for a given situation.

4. Describe the collection of evidence and the logs that go along with crime scene processing. 

5. Conduct an excavation based on a mock crime scene and generate a proper professional report based on these efforts. 


6. Describe the morphological differences between human and animal bone. 


7. Describe the major ethical concerns in excavating human remains in general and the special cases of human remains that are not of forensic significance. 


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Quizzes45 pointsStudents will take 2 quizzes for a total of 45 points
Quiz 1 will cover bone ID. Quiz 2 will cover mapping, compass work and excavation skills
Lab assignments75 points Students will have 5 labs for a total of 75 points
Lab 1 ,2,3 will be skeletal labs with stations of human and non-human bone and nonbone
Lab 4 will cover compass work in the field - students will learn how to orient with their compass from waypoints
Lab 5 will be a mapping exercise where students will have to map a practice crime scene to scale.
Attendance30 points Student attendance is mandatory and attendance will be take via role daily.
Project150 pointsFinal case report and presentation. Students will conduct a mock crime scene in their teams and generate a report of their findings. They will present these findings to the class on the last day of class.
Quiz45 pointsGraduate Students will take 2 quizzes for a total of 45 points Quiz 1 will cover bone ID. Quiz 2 will cover mapping, compass work and excavation skills
Lab assignments75 pointsGraduate Students will have 5 labs for a total of 75 points
Lab 1 ,2,3 will be skeletal labs with stations of human and non-human bone and nonbone
Lab 4 will cover compass work in the field - students will learn how to orient with their compass from waypoints
Lab 5 will be a mapping exercise where students will have to map a practice crime scene to scale.
Attendance30 points Graduate Student attendance is mandatory and attendance will be take via role daily.
Project150 points Graduate students will turn in a Final case report and presentation. Students will conduct a mock crime scene in their teams and generate a report of their findings. They will present these findings to the class on the last day of class
Project100 points Graduate students will complete the following: two academic modules, one associated with GIS and the other entomological (30 points each); and a skeletal preparation project and journal (40 points).
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Axial and appendicular skeleton Day 1 & 2Axial and appendicular skeleton lectures & lab sheets
Human, non-human, and juvenile materials and non bone Day 3 Lectures & lab sheet
Crime scene kit building Day 4Lectures and quiz
Field TechniquesDays 5-10Lectures, lab sheets, quiz and field exercises on compass work, GPS, SIS, transects, mapping, probing, excavation and photography.
Excavation Days 11-13Mock crime scene lectures and group activity at lake wheeler (extended class time)
Final presentations Day 14Crime scene reports and presentations due
mlnosbis 8/31/2017:
1) Effective date must be Spring 2018 or later. CORRECTED
2) Reviewers should note that 3 weeks is an appropriate length for a Maymester course (https://studentservices.ncsu.edu/calendars/academic/#maymester)
3) Typo in the syllabus about grading. I believe you begin by listing undergraduate grades, not graduate. You should also remove the last entry from the CIM form that reads "400 points total" and add a new line for each of the graduate requirements. You can specify graduate for each item. CORRECTED.
4) I suggest a consultation with the College of Sciences. Contact Dr. John Blondin (blondin@ncsu.edu) and add consultation notes to the consultation summary field of this form.

pjharrie 9/1/2017 The course objectives are just a description of the content; they should be focused on what in a broader sense the course is attempting to accomplish. In learning objective 3, what sort of techniques are being referred to? CORRECTED

ABGS Reviewer Comments:
- No concerns
dtcase (Mon, 24 Oct 2016 17:36:51 GMT): Rollback: for edits.
dtcase (Thu, 17 Nov 2016 18:01:38 GMT): Rollback: Syllabus edits.
Key: 11849