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Viewing: SOC 761 / : Contemporary Debates in Food & Environment

Last approved: Tue, 08 May 2018 08:00:14 GMT

Last edit: Mon, 07 May 2018 19:04:39 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
Major
SOC (Sociology)
761
019818
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Contemporary Debates in Food & Environment
Food & Environment
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Sociology (16SOC)
Term Offering
Spring Only
Offered Alternate Even Years
Fall 2018
Previously taught as Special Topics?
Yes
1
 
Course Prefix/NumberSemester/Term OfferedEnrollment
SOC 791Dfall 201610
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded/Audit
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3
Course Attribute(s)


If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Sarah Bowen
Associate Professor
full

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture1010NoNA
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote

Prerequisite: Graduate standing
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
No
This course will be organized around contemporary debates related to the intersections between food and race, class, and gender inequalities. We will focus largely on recent books on these topics, with attention to both their substantive findings as well as the methods and theory employed.

Students in our program who are specializing in our Food and Environment concentration need this course to help them better understand critical debates about food and the environment, including concerns about food insecurity and environmental degradation. 


No

Is this a GEP Course?
GEP Categories

Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 

 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 

 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 

 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 

Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 

 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

College(s)Contact NameStatement Summary
College of Agriculture and Life SciencesJohn DoleFrom John Dole in CALS: "CALS is supportive of the course. It does not appear to conflict or overlap with any of our graduate courses. From Jon Allen and Suzie Goodell in FBNS department: We do not have a similar course at the graduate level. Sarah Ash teaches an IDS course “Eating through American History” that may have some similar material for freshmen through juniors. If anything, this course could be beneficial for some of our students. We might have a couple of students per year interested in taking this course as our PhD program requires a 700 level course related to nutrition outside the Program offerings."
Course will be part of regular teaching load for faculty member.

This course will be organized around contemporary debates related to the intersections between food and race, class, and gender inequalities. Our two primary course objectives are to synthesize and critically analyze recent books on these topics. In order to do so, we will pay attention to both their substantive findings as well as the methods and theory employed. We will focus on three primary theoretical approaches to understanding food and inequality: (1) work on foodwork as a form of gendered carework, (2) work on food and (individual and collective) identity, and (3) work on the political economy of food and food labor. Students will learn about all three of these theoretical perspectives through readings, discussion, and writing exercises.


Student Learning Outcomes

Students will be able to: 

1. Describe and synthesize the overarching theoretical approaches to understanding linkages between food and race, class, and gender inequalities.

2. Evaluate contemporary research on food and inequality: in terms of research design, theoretical approach, and internal logic.

3. Analyze qualitative or quantitative data related to food and inequality using sociological concepts.

4. Write and present a paper that makes a clear, succinct sociological argument about food and inequality, geared to the general public.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Discussion20Active and informed participation constitutes the cornerstone of this seminar and will thus be a major consideration in your grade.
Written Assignment20Weekly comment papers are submitted as responses to the weekly readings and should be 1-2 pages in length.
Other20You will answer one practice prelim-style question.
Major Paper40You will complete a brief review article about food and inequality, approximately 3000 words in length
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Introduction and key concepts1 week
Foodwork, gender, and class 2 weeks
Cooking and food history and identity and inequality3 weeks
Food and ethnicity3 weeks
Hunger and food insecurity 2 weeks
Restaurant labor 3 weeks
Course wrap up 1 week
mlnosbis 3/27/2018:
1) Effective date should be after Spring 2018
2) Suggest consultation with CALS. Contact John Dole (jmdole@ncsu.edu) to obtain a consultation. Insert the consultation notes/summary into the consultation summary field of the CIM form.
3) There is no prerequisite in the CIM field. If graduate standing is required, that should be entered in the field. See help bubble.

cohen (3/29/2018):
I have no suggestions in addition to Melissa's.

ABGS Reviewer Comments 4/17/2018:
- No concerns.
mlnosbis (Thu, 29 Mar 2018 13:17:03 GMT): Rollback: https://grad.ncsu.edu/faculty-and-staff/program-development/new-degree-programs/
sjmcdona (Sat, 31 Mar 2018 15:25:00 GMT): Thanks for your feedback! 1) I corrected the date. 2) I consulted with John Dole in CALS. He indicated support for the course. I added his specific comments to the consultation summary field. 3) I added graduate standing to the prerequisite field.
Key: 11975