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Viewing: SOC 725 : Gender and Crime

Last approved: Sat, 21 Apr 2018 08:00:12 GMT

Last edit: Fri, 20 Apr 2018 11:59:24 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
Major
SOC (Sociology)
725
032599
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Gender and Crime
Gender and Crime
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Sociology (16SOC)
Term Offering
Fall and Spring
Offered Alternate Years
Spring 2018
Previously taught as Special Topics?
Yes
1
 
Course Prefix/NumberSemester/Term OfferedEnrollment
SOC 791GFall 1710
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded/Audit
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3
Course Attribute(s)


If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Stacy De Coster
Associate Professor
Graduate Faculty

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture1010NoNA
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote


Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
No
This seminar will provide an overview of the literatures on gender, crime and violence. The course framework and readings emphasize the social structures of gender, social constructions of gender, symbolic meaning systems, and intersections of race, class and gender. We will examine theoretical approaches and empirical research that informs our understanding of the gendered commission of offending.

Students in our program who are specializing in our Crime, Law, and Social Control concentration need this course to help them better understand the connections between criminological theories of offending and sociological research on gender, sexuality, and inequality.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
GEP Categories

Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 

 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 

 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 

 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 

Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 

 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

This class will be taught as part of the faculty member's normal course load.

The course readings and seminar discussions emphasize the social structures of gender, social constructions of gender, symbolic meaning systems, and intersections of race, class, place, gender, and sexuality.  We will examine theoretical approaches and empirical research that inform our understanding of the gendered commission of offending. With this in mind, the main course objectives focus on developing a broad understanding of the development and current state of theory and research on gender and crime and developing skills to evaluate the literature with an eye toward where it has been, where it is headed, and avenues for future development. These objectives will be met through readings, seminar discussions, written projects, and presentations of research.


Student Learning Outcomes

1. describe gender disparities in offending and how they are shaped by social structures of gender, social constructions of gender, symbolic meaning systems, and intersections of race, class, place, gender, and sexuality;

2. explain the state of knowledge in the field of gender and crime with an ability to acknowledge strengths in the literature while also being critical where appropriate;

3. identify directions for future theorizing and research in the area of gender and crime with the ability to explain how best to pursue such theorizing and research;

4. communicate all of the above to professional audiences in oral and written form.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Written Assignment20Reading Portfolio: Take notes on the required readings for each week, with an emphasis on articulating the main themes of individual readings. After discussing the main theme of the individual readings, write a general analysis of the readings as a set.
Discussion25Engage actively in discussion each week. See syllabus.
Major Paper40An analytical synthesis of literature or a proposal for a specific research project, which includes a discussion of previous research and theorizing. The final paper should not exceed 18 pages in length.
presentation15Students will present their final papers (10-15 minutes). See syllabus.
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Introduction to the Seminar & General Groundwork Readings1 week
Trends in the Gender Gap, Liberation, & Economic Marginalization1 week
Gendered Crime1 week
Gender and Crime3 weeks
The Gender System, Patriarchy, and Intersectionality1 week
Girls and Gangs1 week
Masculinities and Crime1 week
Masculnities, Femininities, and Crime1 week
Engendered Bodies1 week
Gender, Race, Poverty, and the Streets1 week
Poverty, Street Life and Crime: Women in Drug Markets 1 week
Blurred Boundaries and Pathways: Gender, Victimization, and Offending1 week
Student Presentations1 Week
mlnosbis 3/27/2018:
1) Effective date should be after Spring 2018
2) Catalog description should be identified on the syllabus. You can add to the CIM catalog description if you want, but that field is what will be used in the public catalog.
3) Is there any sort of grade reduction for late assignments, or do students get full credit for turning in late assignments? Add that to syllabus.

cohen (3/28/2018):
I have only one suggestion in addition to Melissa's suggestions. This is a 700-level course and may not be taken for credit-only. Please indicate that on the syllabus.
(As an aside: My hope is that if a student has an excused absence, then he or she will not lose credit for turning in an assignment late.)

ABGS Reviewer Comments 4/9/2018:
- Education: I know that we teach gender issues courses in counselor education, but the focus is more broad for the class we teach and this course appears to be specific.
- No concerns.
sjmcdona (Thu, 29 Mar 2018 00:02:33 GMT): Thanks for giving this a careful look. I've addressed these concerns... 1) Effective date should be after Spring 2018 I changed to Fall 2018. 2) Catalog description should be identified on the syllabus. You can add to the CIM catalog description if you want, but that field is what will be used in the public catalog. I changed the syllabus, replacing the Course Overview section with Catalog Description. 3) Is there any sort of grade reduction for late assignments, or do students get full credit for turning in late assignments? Add that to syllabus. I clarified this in the syllabus. Unexcused late assignments receive no credit. Students have one week to turn in an excused late assignment for full credit. I have only one suggestion in addition to Melissa's suggestions. This is a 700-level course and may not be taken for credit-only. Please indicate that on the syllabus. I added this to the first page of the syllabus. (As an aside: My hope is that if a student has an excused absence, then he or she will not lose credit for turning in an assignment late.) That is correct. Students with excused absences have one week to turn in late assignments for full credit.
Key: 11977