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Viewing: CRD 701 : History and Theory of Media Technologies

Last approved: Wed, 01 Jun 2016 08:18:50 GMT

Last edit: Wed, 01 Jun 2016 08:18:50 GMT

Change Type
Major
CRD (Communication Rhetoric & Digital Media)
701
004065
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
History and Theory of Media Technologies
History & Theory of Media Tech
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
CHASS Dean’s Office (16HSS)
Term Offering
Fall Only
Offered Every Year
Fall 2016
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded/Audit
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)


If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Stephen B. Crofts Wiley
Associate Professor
Full

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Seminar1515NoThis course is required for CRDM first year students.
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Prerequisite: Doctoral student
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
CRDCommunication, Rhetoric and Digital MediaRequired
Foundational study of media and technology through examination of historical perspectives on technological change. Discussion of media theory, media archaeology, feminist theory, political economy, cultural studies, and functionalist perspectives on technology. Examination of media and power, social movements, alternative media, technology and development, participatory communication, technological diffusion. Research paper and seminar presentation.

This CRDM core course was created before the program started in 2005. Much has changed in the past 10 years, and the proposed changes reflect new ways the course has been taught in the past few years, and includes expertise of newly hired CRDM core faculty as well.


The revisions to the title aim at also including English faculty who are teaching the course now and who will continue to teach in the future, and who bring a media archeology approach. The focus on media (vs. communication) broadens the disciplinary coverage so that the course can be taught with both an emphasis on humanities and social sciences.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
GEP Categories

Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 

 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 

 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 

 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 

Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 

 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

Faculty will continue to teach this course as part of their regular course load. No new resources are required.

This core course introduces students to historical and theoretical perspectives on the significance of media technologies for socio-technical change, providing a foundation for the study and critical analysis of emerging media. A grasp of the material, social, political, and economic contexts in which technological arrangements and practices emerge allows students to discern the ways culture and society both shape and are shaped by media. Course topics are thus chosen to broadly acquaint students with key historical moments in the history of technology. They provide a framework in which early theorizations of media and technology are studied to enrich the current understanding of new media, digital environments, and the internet. The course also provides grounding in a range of theorizations to give students a broad overview of the multiplicity of approaches that can aid investigations of technological change in social contexts. These include media theory, media archaeology, feminist theory, political economy, cultural studies, and functionalist perspectives on technology.  The course examines topics such as media and power, social movements, alternative media, technology and development, participatory communication, and technological diffusion.


Student Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, students will be able to . . .


1. Identify key historical and theoretical changes in the development of media technologies;

2. Demonstrate historical understanding of technological development in social and political contexts through critical discussion and written analyses of old and new media;

3. Evaluate contemporary popular and scholarly discourse and futurist projections for their ideological, political, social, utopian, and dystopian assumptions about the nature of technological development;

4. Demonstrate critical insight and analytical skills in a research project utilizing one or more of the theoretical approaches to understanding the socio-cultural implications of technological change.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Major Paper40%See syllabus
Short Paper20%See syllabus
presentation10%See syllabus
Participation30%See syllabus
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Course Introduction & Historical MediationsWeek 1Readings:
Michel Foucault, Archaeology of Knowledge, 21-49
Walter Benjamin, “On the Concept of History”
Harold Innis, Introduction to Empire and Communications
Epistemologies of Speech and WritingWeek 2Readings:
Walter Ong, Orality and Literacy, chs. 1-3
Jacques Derrida, “Declarations of Independence”
Lisa Gitelman, “Paper Knowledge” and “A Short History of ____” in Paper Knowledge: Toward a Media History of Documents
Print and Public CulturesWeek 3Readings:
Jürgen Habermas, The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere: An Inquiry into a Category of Bourgeois Society, sections I & II
Benedict Anderson, Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism, chs. 2-3
Michael Warner, “Public and Private” in Publics and Counterpublics
Aural MechanismsWeek 4Readings:
Michel Foucault, Archaeology of Knowledge, 126-131, 135-140, 166-177
Friedrich Kittler, “Gramophone” in Gramophone, Film, Typewriter
James Lastra, “Inscriptions and Simulations: The Imagination of Technology” in Sound Technology and the American Cinema: Perception, Representation, Modernity
Lisa Gitelman, “New Media Publics” in Always Already New
Optical Vectors and Technological ExtensionsWeek 5Readings:
Marshall McLuhan, “The Medium is the Message” in Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man
Martin Heidegger, “The Question Concerning Technology”
Friedrich Kittler, “Introduction” in Gramophone, Film, Typewriter
Jonathan Crary, “Techniques of the Observer” in Techniques of the Observer: On Vision and Modernity in the Nineteenth Century
Writing with Light: Photography & FilmWeek 6Readings:
Charles Musser, “Toward a History of Screen Practice”
Hollis Frampton, “Eadweard Muybridge: Fragments of a Tesseract”
Jimena Canales, “Introduction” and “Captured by Cinematography” in A Tenth of a Second: A History
Walter Benjamin, “Work of Art in the Age of Technological Reproducibility, 2nd Version”
Network Aesthetics and the Electronic WaveWeek 7Readings:
Marshall McLuhan, “Telegraph: The Social Hormone” in Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man
Christopher Keep, “Touching at a Distance: Telegraphy, Gender, and Henry James’s In the Cage” in Media, Technology, and Literature in the Nineteenth Century:
Image, Sound, Touch
Tom Gunning, “Heard Over the Phone: The Lonely Villa and the de Lorde Tradition of the Terrors of Technology”
Recommended: Henry James, In the Cage
Imagining TV and BroadcastingWeek 8Readings:
William Uricchio, “Television’s First Seventy-Five Years: The Interpretive Flexibility of a Medium in Transition”
Doron Galili, “The Nineteenth-Century Origins of the Transmitted and the Cinematic Moving Image” in “Seeing by Electricity: The Emergence of Television
and the Modern Mediascape, 1878-1939”.
Daneil Czitrom, “The Ethereal Hearth: American Radio from Wireless through Broadcasting, 1892-1940” in Media and the American Mind: From Morse to McLuhan
Lynn Spigel, “Domestic Ideals and Family Amusements: From the Victorians to the Broadcast Age” in Make Room for TV: Television and the Family Ideal in Postwar
America
Software and Decoding Digital ObjectsWeek 9Readings:
Vannevar Bush, “As We May Think”
Lev Manovich, “What is New Media?” in The Language of New Media
Wendy Hui Kyong Chun, “Introduction,” “On Sourcery and Source Codes,” in Programmed Visions: Software and Memory
Jonathan Sterne, “The MP3 as Cultural Artifact” & “The Making of a Standard” in MP3: The Meaning of a Format
Friedrich Kittler, “There is No Software”
Platforms and the Materiality of Digital MediaWeek 10Readings:
Ivan Sutherland, “Sketchpad: A Man-Machine Graphical Communication System”
Matthew G. Kirschenbaum, “Introduction: ‘Awareness of the Mechanism,’”“‘Every Contact Leaves a Trace’: Storage, Inscription, and Computer Forensics” in
Mechanisms: New Media and the Forensic Imagination
Nick Montfort and Ian Bogost, “Stella” in Racing the Beam: The Atari Video Computer System
Zabet Patterson, “Introduction” and “What Was a Microfilm Plotter?” in Peripheral
Vision: Bell Labs, the S-C 4020, and the Origins of Computer Art
Technological Actors and Media EcologiesWeek 11Readings
Bruno Latour, We Have Never Been Modern, chapters 1-2
John Law, “Actor Network Theory and Material Semiotics” in The New Blackwell Companion to Social Theory
Bill Brown, “Thing Theory”
Jane Bennett, “The Force of Things,” in Vibrant Matter: A Political Ecology of Things
John Durham Peters, “Understanding Media” in Marvelous Clouds: Toward a Philosophy of Elemental Media
Digital Networks ReconsideredWeek 12Readings:
Gilles Deleuze, “Postscript on the Societies of Control”
Alexander Galloway and Eugene Thacker, “Nodes” in The Exploit
Danah Boyd, “Social Network Sites: Definition, History, and Scholarship” and “White Flight in Networked Publics? How Race and Class Shaped American Teen
Engagement with MySpace and Facebook”
Moving into the Archive, Thinking ArchaeologicallyWeek 13Readings:
Wolfgang Ernst, Digital Memory and the Archive, parts I & II
Jussi Parikka, “Introduction: The Materiality of Media and Waste”
Jonathan Sterne, “Out with the Trash: On the Future of New Media” in Residual Media
Student PresentationsWeek 14Student Presentations
Final PaperWeek 15Final paper due
mlnosbis 2/16/2016: No conflicting/overlapping courses. Is consultation needed?

ghodge 2/17/2016. No consultation needed. Please update syllabus to reflect the proposal in CIM. Previous syllabus is downloaded.

ABGS Reviewer Comments:
-Only suggestion is to rephrase the following: acquaint students with key historical moments in the history of technology. (Repetition of "history).
Key: 1201