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Viewing: CRD 704 : Communication, Technologies, and Pedagogy

Last approved: Wed, 01 Jun 2016 08:18:35 GMT

Last edit: Wed, 01 Jun 2016 08:18:35 GMT

Change Type
Major
CRD (Communication Rhetoric & Digital Media)
704
004068
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Communication, Technologies, and Pedagogy
Comm, Technologies & Pedagogy
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
CHASS Dean’s Office (16HSS)
Term Offering
Fall Only
Offered Every Year
Fall 2016
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded/Audit
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)


If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Chris M. Anson
Distinguished University Professor
Full

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Seminar1515NoThis course is required for CRDM first year students.
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Prerequisite: Doctoral student
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
CRDCommunication, Rhetoric, and Digital MediaRequired
History, theory, research, and practice of integrating technology in higher education. Design, implementation, and critique of instructional strategies; ethical and professional issues; effects on the practices of teaching and learning and the development of communication abilities.

This CRDM core course CAF was created before the program started in 2005. Much has changed in the past 10 years, and the changes in this CAF reflect new ways the course has been taught in the past few years, and includes expertise of newly hired CRDM core faculty as well.


The new title also reflects more accurate the new contents of the course. 


No

Is this a GEP Course?
GEP Categories

Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 

 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 

 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 

 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 

Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 

 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

College(s)Contact NameStatement Summary
College of EducationDr. Ellen VasuEmail to us dated 2/29/16: Dr. Vasu writes that "Pedagogy does not conflict with anything being offered in our college. Sincerely, Ellen Vasu"
Faculty will be teaching this course as part of their regular course load. No new faculty are required to teach this course. The Departments of Communication and English have many faculty qualified to teach it (Anson, Fyfe, Taylor, Dannels). No special resources needed.

Institutions of higher education are transforming the processes of teaching and learning by incorporating new technologies into traditional classroom settings and creating alternatives to those settings through online and hybrid instruction. Training programs in the workplace are being similarly transformed. Regardless of students’ career goals, a familiarity with the relationship between learning and technology is essential because of the centrality of technology-mediated practices in education, work, and everyday life, and the importance of these practices in students’ own ongoing development as both learners and educators. New information and communication technologies are also affecting the nature of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and visual communication, accentuating the role of these modalities in all subjects. This course focuses on the history, theory, research, and practice of technology to the processes of teaching and learning. 


Student Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, students will be able to . . .



  1. identify areas of scholarship across several disciplines engaged in the study of technology and pedagogy with emphasis on the acquisition of higher literacy and communication abilities in students;

  2. place the pedagogical uses of digital media into a broader historical context;

  3. articulate new questions for exploration and research concerning the relationship between technology, teaching, and learning;

  4. conduct research on the principled application of technology to teaching and learning;

  5. to integrate technological innovations (in hardware, applications, and instructional methodology) into various contexts for teaching and learning, in principled and theoretically sound ways.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Participation202. Participation. Our class will be conducted as a seminar which will thrive on the participation of its members. Participation means thoughtfully preparing any reading materials, exploring study objects, and communicating with the seminar. It includes but is not limited to speaking up in class. While this is strongly encouraged, our course will provide multiple ways of participating in the topic and materials.
Short Paper15a. Statement of Teaching Philosophy. A polished, gripping, one-page piece of pedagogical opinion. Notoriously difficult to write, these statements are often required of applicants to teaching jobs.
Project15b. Digital assignment. A robust explanation of an assignment, module, or related activity from your projected course. This will include a reflection with your rationale, critical references, and inspirations. It also requires a one-page assessment plan for how you will study, measure, document, or otherwise assess the outcomes of your course.
Written Assignment15c. Sample syllabus. An embodiment of your expressed philosophy and your ambitions for the applied and theoretical opportunities of teaching with technologies. This fully articulated course might be prospective for something you want to teach at NC State or beyond. It will include a section on your rationale and changes made during its development.
presentation57. Final presentation. On our scheduled examination day we will have a show-and-tell in which everyone presents a brief summary of their teaching portfolio, explaining in an accessible way where it fits into our course’s conversations as well as their own professional interests. These five-minute presentations will take a special form called “Pecha Kucha”—a highly visual style that will aid you in making effective presentations in the future. Further instructions to come.
Written Assignment306. Teaching Portfolio. The course culminates in a “portfolio” containing several traditional and useful genres of academic production. The elements of the portfolio will comprise the assignments for the course during the semester. The entire portfolio is due on our scheduled examination day. Its contents include:

a. Statement of Teaching Philosophy. A polished, gripping, one-page piece of pedagogical opinion. Notoriously difficult to write, these statements are often required of applicants to teaching jobs.
b. Digital assignment. A robust explanation of an assignment, module, or related activity from your projected course. This will include a reflection with your rationale, critical references, and inspirations. It also requires a one-page assessment plan for how you will study, measure, document, or otherwise assess the outcomes of your course.
c. Sample syllabus. An embodiment of your expressed philosophy and your ambitions for the applied and theoretical opportunities of teaching with technologies. This fully articulated course might be prospective for something you want to teach at NC State or beyond. It will include a section on your rationale and changes made during its development.
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Welcome and OverviewWeek 1In class: Introduce course structure. Create a collaborative matrix of pedagogy. Initial suggestions for syllabus changes. Begin first assignment.
Homework: Respond to Known.com introduction. Create profile and initial post or reply to something posted. Finish initial ruminations on Statement of Teaching Philosophy (STP).
Your Brain on ComputersWeek 2Submit: Initial Known posts
Read in advance:
- Bauerlein, Mark. “Screen Time.” The Dumbest Generation: How the Digital Age Stupefies Young Americans and Jeopardizes Our Future. Tarcher/Penguin, 2008. 71-111.
- Davidson, Cathy N. “Project Classroom Makeover.” Now You See It: How the Brain Science of Attention Will Transform the Way We Live, Work, and Learn. New York: Viking, 2011. 61-104.
In class: Review revised syllabus. Discussion of learning and technologies. Group workshop of statement of teaching philosophy, creating and then using a rubric.
Homework: Solicit and analyze a Statement of Teaching Philosophy from your field. Evaluate for next class after reading O’Neal, Meizlish, Kaplan (see below). Group A generates annotations for collective bibliography.
Technologies of Engagement and InteractionWeek 3Submit: Group A critical annotations. Known posts.
Student sign-up (multimodality): ___________
Read in advance:
- Mueller, Pam A., and Daniel M. Oppenheimer. “The Pen Is Mightier Than the Keyboard: Advantages of Longhand Over Laptop Note Taking.” Psychological Science (2014): 1-10.
- Moreno, Roxana, and Richard Mayer. “Interactive Multimodal Learning Environments.” Educational Psychology Review 19.3 (2007): 309–326.
- Novak, Matt. “15 Technologies That Were Supposed to Change Education Forever.” Paleofuture 15 Jan. 2014. Web. http://paleofuture.gizmodo.com/15-technologies-that-were-supposed-to-change-education-1481232959
And for background on STPs:
- O’Neal, Chris, Deborah Meizlish, and Matthew Kaplan. Writing a Statement of Teaching Philosophy for the Academic Job Search. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan, 2003. Web. http://www.crlt.umich.edu/publinks/CRLT_no23.pdf
In class: Reports from the field. Discussions of readings and experiment with multimodal writing platforms. Workshops on STPs from different fields.
Homework: First draft of STP.
New Models for the ClassroomWeek 4Submit: STP first draft. Group B critical annotations. Resource pool.
Student sign-up (hybrid, flipped, blended teaching, etc.): ________________
Read in advance:
- Freeman, Scott et al. “Active Learning Increases Student Performance in Science, Engineering, and Mathematics.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 111.23 (2014): 8410–8415. Web. http://www.pnas.org/content/111/23/8410
- Hertz, Mary Beth. “The Flipped Classroom: Pro and Con.” Edutopia 10 July 2012. Web. http://www.edutopia.org/blog/flipped-classroom-pro-and-con-mary-beth-hertz
- Shirky, Clay. “Why I Just Asked My Students To Put Their Laptops Away….” Medium. N.p., 8 Sept. 2014. Web. https://medium.com/@cshirky/why-i-just-asked-my-students-to-put-their-laptops-away-7f5f7c50f368
- Young, Jeffrey R. “When Computers Leave Classrooms, So Does Boredom.” The Chronicle of Higher Education 20 July 2009. Web. http://chronicle.com/article/Teach-Naked-Effort-Strips/47398/
In class: Guest visit from NC State DELTA, or visit to the DELTA office. Emergence of active, flipped, and blended learning environments. Issues in legality, privacy, and accessibility. Peer review workshop on first STP drafts.
Digital PedagogyWeek 5Submit: Group C critical annotations.
Student sign-up (play, screwing around): ____________
Read in advance:
- Harris, Katherine D. "Play, Collaborate, Break, Build, Share: 'Screwing Around' in Digital Pedagogy." Polymath: An Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences Journal 3.3 (2013): n. pag. Web. https://ojcs.siue.edu/ojs/index.php/polymath/article/view/2853
- Rheingold, Howard, and Gardner Campbell. “Gardner Campbell Channels Engelbart: Augmenting Human Education.” Connected Learning Alliance, 2014. 15 min film. https://vimeo.com/106192626
- Wesch, Michael. “From Knowledgable to Knowledge-Able: Learning in New Media Environments.” Academic Commons 7 Jan. 2009. Web. http://www.academiccommons.org/2014/09/09/from-knowledgable-to-knowledge-able-learning-in-new-media-environments/
In class: Virtual guest visit and discussion with one of the editors of Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities (TBD). The emergence of “digital pedagogy.” Walk through second assignment on designing digital projects.
Homework: Initial sketch of planned assignment. Identify comparable models. Draft a project plan.
Designing Digital AssignmentsWeek 6Submit: Project plan for Assignment #2.
Read in advance
- Berens, Kathi Inman. “Interface.” Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities: Concepts, Models, and Experiments. Ed. Rebecca Frost Davis et al. New York: Modern Language Association, 2015. Web. https://digitalpedagogy.commons.mla.org/keywords/interface/
- Groom, Jim, and Brian Lamb. “Reclaiming Innovation.” EDUCAUSE Review 49.3 (2014). Web. http://www.educause.edu/visuals/shared/er/extras/2014/ReclaimingInnovation/default.html
- Stommel, Jesse. “12 Steps for Creating a Digital Assignment or Hybrid Class.” Jesse Stommel 18 Aug. 2014. Web. http://jessestommel.com/12-steps-for-creating-a-digital-assignment-or-hybrid-class/
In class: Reports from the field. Discuss initial ideas for project plans. Create and discuss workflow for digital assignment design. Apply to a sample assignment.
New Media Environments (FIELD TRIP TO HUNT LIBRARY)Week 7Submit: Group A critical annotations. Resource pool.
Student sign-up (visualization, maps, mobilities, social learning, etc.): _________
Read in advance
- Mark Bilandzic, and Marcus Foth. “Libraries as Coworking Spaces: Understanding User Motivations and Perceived Barriers to Social Learning.” Library Hi Tech 31.2 (2013): 254–273. McCullough, Malcolm. “Ambient.” Ambient Commons: Attention in the Age of Embodied Information. Cambridge, MA: MIT, 2013. 7-24.
- Kevin M. Leander, Nathan C. Philips & Katherine Headrick Taylor: “The changing social spaces of learning: Mapping new mobilities”.
In class: The future of libraries and information commons. Student learning habits. Teaching with visualization.
NO CLASS / FALL BREAKWeek 8Submit: Group B critical annotations. Resource pool.
Homework: Work on brief pitches for in-class digital assignment review.
Visualization and Critical Making (FIELD TRIP TO DH HILL) Week 9Submit: Group C critical annotations.
Student sign-up (visualization, critical making): ________________
Read in advance
- Heer, Jeffrey, Michael Bostock, and Vadim Ogievetsky. “A Tour Through the Visualization Zoo.” Stanford HCI Group. 2014. Web. http://hci.stanford.edu/jheer/files/zoo/
- Sayers, Jentery, and Garnet Hertz. “Humanities and Critical Approaches to Technology.” CTHEORY 21C.008 (2015). Web. http://ctheory.net/articles.aspx?id=756
In class: Discussion with Dr. Helen Burgess about visualization for teaching. Visit to MakerSpace and discussion with Adam Rogers about critical making. Group A presents digital assignments for workshopping. Test platform for peer comment and feedback.
GamingWeek 10Student sign-up (gaming): ______________
Read in advance
- Bogost, Ian. “Gamification Is Bullshit.” The Atlantic 9 Aug. 2011. Web. http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2011/08/gamification-is-bullshit/243338/
- Sansing, Chad. “Towards a Better Culture of Games.” Educator Innovator Blog, National Writing Project. Sept 6, 2014. Web. http://educatorinnovator.org/toward-a-better-culture-of-games/
- Adriana de Souza e Silva and Girlie C. Delacruz, “Hybrid reality games reframed: Potential uses in educational contexts”.
In class: Group B presents digital assignments for workshopping. Test platform for peer comment and feedback.
Distance Learning and Massive DisruptionsWeek 11Student sign-up (distance learning, online courses): ______________
Read in advance
- Davidson, Cathy. “10 Things I’ve Learned (So Far) from Making a Meta-MOOC.” Hybrid Pedagogy 16 Jan. 2014. Web. http://www.hybridpedagogy.com/journal/10-things-learned-from-making-a-meta-mooc/
- Desmond J. Keegan: “On defining distance education”
- Schaffhauser, Dian. “Education Leaders See MOOCs, Distance Learning as the Future of Higher Ed.” Campus Technology 20 Aug. 2012. Web. http://campustechnology.com/articles/2012/08/20/education-leaders-see-moocs-distance-learning-as-the-future.aspx
- Nakamura, Lisa, Elizabeth Losh, and Anne Balsamo. How to Build Inclusive Learning Collectives. DML Research Hub, 2014. Film. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TdXAMSdsSms
In class: Group C presents digital assignments for workshopping. Test platform for peer comment and feedback.
The Politics of PedagogyWeek 12Student sign-up (politics of digital pedagogy): __________
Read in advance
- Select two stories from Watters, Audrey. Teaching Machines. 2015. Web. http://teachingmachin.es/
- Chang, Edmond Y. “Queer.” Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities: Concepts, Models, and Experiments. Ed. Rebecca Frost Davis et al. New York: Modern Language Association, 2015. Web. https://digitalpedagogy.commons.mla.org/keywords/queer/
- Chatelain, Marcia. “How to Teach Kids About What’s Happening in Ferguson.” The Atlantic 25 Aug. 2014. Web. http://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2014/08/how-to-teach-kids-about-whats-happening-in-ferguson/379049/
- Stommel, Jesse. “Critical Digital Pedagogy: A Definition.” Hybrid Pedagogy (2014). Web. http://www.hybridpedagogy.com/journal/critical-digital-pedagogy-definition/
In class: Virtual guest visit from figure in critical digital pedagogy (TBD). Discussion of designing assignments, courses, and classroom environments for access and inclusivity.
Homework: General sketch of the parameters for Assignment #3, the complete syllabus.
AssessmentWeek 13Submit: Assessment plan for digital assignment design
Student sign-up (assessment): __________
Read in advance
- Bishop-Clark, Cathy, and Beth Dietz-Uhler. Engaging in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. Sterling, VA: Stylus, 2012.
- Danielewicz, Jane, and Peter Elbow. “A Unilateral Grading Contract to Improve Learning and Teaching.” College Composition and Communication 61.2 (2009): 244–268. Web. http://works.bepress.com/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1039&context=peter_elbow
- HASTAC Scholars Program. “Grading 2.0: Evaluation in the Digital Age.” HASTAC. 19 Nov. 2009. Web. https://www.hastac.org/initiatives/hastac-scholars/scholars-forums/grading-20-evaluation-digital-age
- Rheingold, Howard. “Assessing, Measuring Connected Learning Outcomes.” DMLcentral 19 Jan. 2015. Web. http://dmlcentral.net/blog/howard-rheingold/assessing-measuring-connected-learning-outcomes
- Stommel, Jesse. “12 Steps for Designing an Assignment with Emergent Outcomes.” Slideshare, 2014. http://www.slideshare.net/jessestommel/12-steps-39351724
In class: Discussion and assessment workshop
Homework: Draft of assessment plan for digital assignment design (#2)
The SyllabusWeek 14Submit: Sketch for assignment #3
Read in advance
- Syllabus journal [TBD]
In class: Syllabus workshop using samples from NC State
Homework: Write a brief summary post on Known about current conversations surrounding ed tech, digital pedagogy, learning with digital media as we’ve seen them develop this semester outside our syllabus. In other words, write a post drawing lessons from and making connections across all the stuff which has come across your social media and Known feeds this fall, and how that has/not come to inform your teaching philosophy, assignment ideas, or course plans.
The Way We Teach NowWeek 15Submit: Resource pool reflection.
Read in advance: All the resource pool
In class: Reflections on (in?) the resource pool. Pecha Kucha practice.
Homework: Final portfolios
Final Exercises / Mini-ConferenceWeek 16Final portfolios due. Final presentations during scheduled exam block (9:00-11:00 am).
mlnosbis 2/16/2016: Possible consult with College of Education (Ellen Vasu) to see if any of its courses overlap with this material. Please enter consultation notes in the "Consults" field of the form.

ghodge 2/17/2016 Need consult with College of Education. Edit syllabus to be consistent with the coure revision submitted in CIM

Consultation added. Ready for ABGS Reviewers.

ABGS Reviewer Comments:
-No suggestions
Key: 1204