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Viewing: SOC 705 / : Historical Materialism Approaches to Social Theory

Last approved: Sat, 21 Apr 2018 08:00:13 GMT

Last edit: Fri, 20 Apr 2018 12:02:13 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
Major
SOC (Sociology)
705
032600
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Historical Materialism Approaches to Social Theory
Historical Materialism
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Sociology (16SOC)
Term Offering
Spring Only
Offered Alternate Years
Summer I 2018
Previously taught as Special Topics?
Yes
1
 
Course Prefix/NumberSemester/Term OfferedEnrollment
SOC 791MSpring 201610
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded/Audit
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3
Course Attribute(s)


If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Stefano Longo
Associate Professor
Graduate Faculty

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture1010NoNA
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote


Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
No
This sociological theory course will cover the development of Marxist social thought from the 19th century to the present. We will explore themes, arguments, and debates during this era, concentrating on theoretical developments and syntheses in the historical materialist traditions, and explore their relevance and application for sociological research. Issues and topics will be broadly organized around theories of class, gender, race, power, ideology, culture, capitalist development, science, social crises, social change, and social justice.

The course is a theory elective for students in our program. They need this course to help them better understand how to connect classical social theories to contemporary sociological debates.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
GEP Categories

Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 

 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 

 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 

 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 

Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 

 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

Faculty will teach this course as part of a regular course load.

The intent of this course is to examine prominent critical social theories, emphasizing the development of Marxist social thought in the historical materialist tradition. In doing so, students in this course will develop a broad understanding of theoretical debates in sociology and advance their critical analytical skills. Students will be encouraged to approach the theories covered in the course critically and creatively, in order to facilitate their own distinctive syntheses and advance their research projects.


Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: 

1. Describe and critically analyze central theoretical concepts and debates in sociological theory;

2. Evaluate the contributions of social theorists in the Marxist tradition to sociological research; 

3. Compare and contrast the works of leading social theorists;

4. Apply the theories and concepts to contemporary sociological concerns;

5. Analyze social issues by drawing on the theorists covered in class;

6. Communicate all of the above in oral and written form.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Participation20Students are expected to attend and be well prepared to engage in classroom activities and analyze weekly materials in depth. See syllabus.
Discussion30The discussion leaders should highlight important concepts/theories that emerge from the readings, generate discussion, and guide a close examination of the readings. See syllabus.
Short Paper10Students should submit an extended abstract for the course paper (500-750 words) followed by an outline for the paper and a working bibliography. See syllabus.
Major Paper40Utilizing important concepts from this course, the paper must develop an analysis that critically examines the topic of choice. The paper should not
exceed 6,000 words. See syllabus.
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Social Theory and Sociology1 week
Political Economy1 week
Theory, Praxis, and Hegemony1 week
Education and Social Justice1 week
Global Development and Capital Accumulation1 week
Imperialism1 week
Marxist Feminism1 week
Marxism and the Family1 week
Critical Theory1 week
Capitalism and Growth1 week
Labor and Work1 week
Ecology and Society1 week
Religion and Ideology1 week
Science and Society1 week
Social Change and Crisis1 week
mlnosbis 3/8/2018:
1) Effective date must be Summer 2018 or later. It is too late for Spring 2018. (CHANGED)
2) What is the relationship between this course and SOC 702- Contemporary Sociological Theory? Is 702 still offered and is another elective option? They may not be related, but I cannot tell from the 702 course description. RESPONSE: 702 covers a broader range of theoretical perspectives, emphasizing approaches since the mid 1900s (e.g., Foucault; Bourdieu; Berger and Luckmann). 705 focuses specifically on the historical materialist perspective which has a much longer tradition in sociology (e.g., Marx and Engels; Frankfurt School). 702 is still offered and is another elective option.
3) The course description on the CIM form should match that on the syllabus. The CIM field is what will be in the public catalog, so make sure it is correct. (FIXED)

cohen (3/13/2018):
1. The Course Objectives in CIM should match those on the syllabus. (FIXED)
2. Please see if you can strengthen the first Learning Outcome. (STRENGTHENED)
3. Note that the scale for A+ is different than the scale for B+, C+ and D+. That is, of course, left to the discretion of the instructor.
4. Please check the links in the syllabus in the section on NC State's policies, rules and regulations. I checked a few of the links and they did not go to the correct websites. (FIXED)
5. This looks like a great course!

ABGS Reviewer Comments 4/9/2018:
- No concerns.
wrs (Thu, 11 Jan 2018 19:52:58 GMT): Rollback: Stefano seems to think Historical Materialism Approaches to Social Theory would be a better title.
Key: 12173