Preview Workflow

Viewing: HON 340 : Religion and Freedom

Last approved: Fri, 31 Mar 2017 11:57:01 GMT

Last edit: Fri, 31 Mar 2017 11:57:01 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
Major
HON (Honors)
340
032445
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Religion and Freedom
Religion and Freedom
Division of Academic and Student Affairs
Honors Program (24HON)
Term Offering
Fall Only
Offered Every Year
Fall 2017
Previously taught as Special Topics?
Yes
2
 
Course Prefix/NumberSemester/Term OfferedEnrollment
HON 296-003Fall 201620
HON 296-003Fall 201520
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Letter Grade Only
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Seminar3
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Jason C. Bivins
Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Seminar2020NoCould teach as lecture course and expand if necessary, but this number refers to anticipated enrollment if added in its current format.
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
R: University Honors Program Students; others by permission of the University Honors Program
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
No
For a variety of reasons, "religion" is one of the most controversial subject matters in contemporary cultures. Beyond sensationalism and outrage, though, modern societies have taken shape in part through complex debates about the role (or lack thereof) of religion in public life. At the core of these considerations are clashing understandings of the relation between religion and freedom, two broad categories with a range of different meanings. This course will explore these differing understandings by considering: legal arguments proposing freedom of religion, and the challenges of religious pluralism; arguments urging freedom from religion, in defense of secular public life; and invocations of freedom through religion, via human creative expression, social activism, ritual, or cosmology. We will examine not just scholarly writings about religion but literature, films, and other media that have shaped the ongoing conversation.

The relevance of religion in contemporary debates about citizenship, law, and reason - not just in the United States but globally - is increasing with each passing year. Rigorous study of and immersion in these debates are consistent with NCSU's strategic plan, public mission, and commitment to interdisciplinary, civic-oriented learning. The course aims to give students a historically-grounded understanding of how various religious and political traditions have thought about these issues, and to focus on their contemporary articulations in complex, controversial case studies (including from literature and other art forms). Students will thus develop their critical analytical skills in unique ways by engaging one of our world's most pressing subjects.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Interdisciplinary Perspectives
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Students will distinguish between the critical analysis of fiction, non-fiction, and poetry (Literature), and the historical and discursive approaches of Religious Studies.
 
 
Submission of writing assignments which summarize and reflect upon course readings. Ex: How and why do the authors of this week’s readings express the concept of “freedom” differently?
 
 
Students will draw connections between the critical analysis of fiction and poetry (Literature), and the historical and discursive approaches of Religious Studies.
 
 
Submission of writing assignments which summarize and reflect upon course readings. Ex: How does the author’s basic understanding of religion shape how he or she understands and describes the public limits of free exercise?
 
 
Students will interpret the texts we study through the lenses provided by larger historical processes and theoretical models.
 
 
Successful completion of in-class written examinations. Ex: Describe the changing role and interpretation of the canon in Hinduism, Judaism, and Christianity.
 
 
Religious Studies, Literature, History, Politics
 
 
Compare and contrast different scholarly genres by contextualizing historically, analyzing key structural and symbolic features, attending to strategies of argumentation, and focusing on how practitioners apply key themes and texts to lived contexts and challenges.
Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
0 (see below)
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
Restricted to University Honors Program students. Open to other students by permission of the UHP.
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
Yes
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
No pre-requisites
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
None
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
See attached syllabus.
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
See attached syllabus.
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
N/A
In previous sections, I have had an Honors Program teaching fellow. The course requires no additional resources beyond this (and can be taught without an Honors fellow if necessary).

Distinguish between the distinct approaches of two or more disciplines. Identify and apply authentic connections between two or more disciplines. Explore and synthesize the approaches or views of two or more disciplines.


Student Learning Outcomes

Students will distinguish between the critical analysis of fiction, non-fiction, and poetry (Literature), and the historical and discursive approaches of Religious Studies. Students will draw connections between the critical analysis of fiction and poetry (Literature), and the historical and discursive approaches of Religious Studies. Students will interpret the texts we study through the lenses provided by larger historical processes and theoretical models.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Written AssignmentSee attached syllabusParticipation and Discussion: 20%
Weekly Reading Summaries/Analyses: 10%
Midterm Exam: 20%
Paper: 15%
Media Journal: 15%
Final Exam: 20%
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
See attached syllabusSee attached syllabusSee attached syllabus

gsklute (Thu, 05 Jan 2017 01:35:46 GMT): Rollback: Hello Jason, thank you for submitting the course proposal. This course meets interdisciplinary perspective GEP, however, the information related to the GEP requirement is missing in the system. Please let me know if you have any questions. Thanks again, Genia
gsklute (Fri, 06 Jan 2017 02:35:57 GMT): Rollback: Hi Jason, Sorry to bother you again, however, it seems that the answers under the "Interdisciplinary Perspectives" section are still missing. It does appear clearly in the syllabus and have to be included in CIM as well. Thanks again, Genia
kkharris (Mon, 30 Jan 2017 21:13:13 GMT): Rollback: Feedback from UC-CCC 1.30.17 - Course Approved with friendly suggestions of minor revisions to syllabus including: formatting, electronic devices policy, and grading scale.
gsklute (Mon, 06 Feb 2017 02:24:10 GMT): Rollback: Hello Jason, The U. College Course and Curriculum Committee reviewed the syllabus last week and its approval pending one minor change. The grading scale that appears in the syllabus has a gap, e.g between 96 and 97. I will email you the University standard grading scale, which addresses this question. This is just one way to resolve it -- you may choose to do it differently. Please address this gap and submit it. Thank you!
aeherget (Thu, 16 Feb 2017 19:43:01 GMT): AECHH: Updated course length and restrictions for peoplesoft coding. 2/16/2017
Key: 13178