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Viewing: HON 390 : Music and the Celtic World

Last approved: Sat, 29 Apr 2017 08:02:02 GMT

Last edit: Sat, 29 Apr 2017 08:02:02 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
Major
HON (Honors)
390
032451
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Music and the Celtic World
Music and the Celtic World
Division of Academic and Student Affairs
Honors Program (24HON)
Term Offering
Fall and Spring
Offered Upon Demand
Fall 2017
Previously taught as Special Topics?
Yes
2
 
Course Prefix/NumberSemester/Term OfferedEnrollment
HON 299Spring 201420
HON 299Spring 201520
HON 299Spring 201720
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Letter Grade Only
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Seminar3
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Jonathan Kramer
Teaching Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Seminar2020NoN/A
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
R: University Honors Program
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
No
In this course, students explore the diverse musics of the Celtic world, from cultural practices of the ancient Celts to folk and popular traditions of Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Brittany, Galicia, Cape Breton, and the United States. They investigate the origin and meanings of "Celtic music," and study its diverse instrumental, vocal, and dance traditions, and its varied performance practices, occasions, and purposes. Through history, literature, poetry, spirituality, and mythology, students examine the realities and fictions of the ancient and modern Celtic world. Through live and recorded music and dance performance, they consider the continuities of Celtic culture across time and space, and the significance of Celtic music today in terms of cultural identity, tradition, and globalization.

Music is integral to people’s lives as a vital means of expressing who we are, where we live, and what we feel and believe. In the diverse society in which we live, music serves as an important form of communication, uniting communities and reaching across cultural and social boundaries. This course introduces students to a culture outside the mainstream in North America, whose traditional music and dance in recent decades have spread on a global scale. For University Honors Program students who will be leaders in America and elsewhere, this course allows them to explore and understand the meanings and roles of music in our increasingly diverse society and interconnected world. 


Yes
Students may be required to cover the cost of an on-campus event.
Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Global Knowledge
Interdisciplinary Perspectives
Visual & Performing Arts
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
1. Distinguish between disciplinary methodologies by which various aspects of musical cultures are understood, i.e. Musicology, Ethnomusicology, Anthropology, and Mythology.
 
 
1. The "Táin Bó Cúailnge" ("Cattle Raid of Cooley") is the longest and most important tale in the Ulster Cycle of Irish mythology, and one of the greatest prose sagas of the ancient world. The tale contains a number of references to musicians, songs, and poetic verse: for example, harpers, bards, poets, and solo singing and chanting. What can we discern about the uses of music and poetry and the roles they played in ancient Celtic society and culture from this early text? Draw broadly on these text references in your response.
 
 
2. Develop understanding between various aspects of a society, such as the relationship between music and social life (Anthropology).
 
 
The Celts measured time according to their knowledge of astronomy (of solar and lunar cycles), the passing of nights (and days), and the passing of seasons; as well as with their associated activities and festivities. Celtic festivals marked important days of the year: Samhain, Winter Solstice, Imbolc, Spring Equinox, Beltane, Summer Solstice, Lughnassa, and Autumn Equinox. (a) Drawing on your class readings and class discussions, describe THREE of these Celtic festivals. What activities would take place, and which Celtic god (if any) was celebrated on that day? (b) Then research and discuss any TWO of the eight Celtic festivals listed above that are still celebrated, in any of the Celtic regions. Describe in what ways the ancient traditions are being maintained, revived, reinvented, and/or replaced in human social life today.
 
 
3. Synthesize from these multiple perspectives a comprehensive sense of music in culture and music as culture in the Celtic world of the past and present.
 
 
Sean Williams writes in “Focus: Irish Traditional Music,” “In the twenty-first century, [the term] “Celtic music” has become a modern construction emerging from a perceived shared identity in opposition to a dominant culture” (p.82). The cultural and musical traditions of this “shared identity” include Irish, Scottish, Welsh, Cornish, Manx, Breton, and Galician. Drawing on your readings and class discussions, what are the significant elements (historical, linguistic, cultural, musical) that bring these regions together under the rubric “Celtic”? Identify and explain.
 
 
The course will apply methodologies used in Ethnomusicology, Anthropology, and Mythology to form a comprehensive understanding of traditional music and culture in the Celtic regions of the world.
 
 
The instructor will present course material through interactive lectures, discussions, guided readings, films, videos, and audio recordings, and guest artists will give lecture/workshops, introducing and employing the various disciplinary perspectives. Students will demonstrate, by the end of the semester, their comprehensive understanding of the various components of Celtic music and culture. They will be able to compare those components of two different geographical regions in the Celtic world; and in a final research project they will analyze a Celtic music or dance topic using the various disciplinary approaches.
Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Course Outcome 1: Interpret and analyze music on the basis of its structural, stylistic, and aesthetic elements and its social and historical contexts.
 
 
Students will respond to the following question on Writing Assignment #3:
Vocal music that emphasizes rhythm over melody, beat over lyrics, exists in various parts of the Celtic world: lilting in Ireland, waulking songs and puirt-a-beul in Scotland, and kan ha diskan in Brittany, for example. First, describe two of these types of song in terms of lyrics/syllables, rhythms, melodies, musical form, and performance context (uses of music). Second, describe an example of your own (in these same terms) in which rhythm is the primary focus of the music. In your view, why does the rhythm overpower the lyrics?
 
 
Course Outcome 2: Identify and apply the basic concepts and terms used in musical investigation to specific musical performances in Ireland, Scotland, and other "Celtic nations."
 
 
Students will answer the following questions on Writing Assignment #1:
Perhaps the two most common forms of music in the Irish and Scottish traditions are reels and jigs. Describe the characteristics of each of these two musical forms in your own words. In Williams, Ch. 6, the author discusses these two instrumental forms under the headings “Join the Session.” Why does she then describe Airs under the heading “Don’t Join the Session”? What is an “Air” and why is this considered inappropriate for a musical session?
 
 
Course Outcome 3: Distinguish and evaluate the roles of music in expressing social identity.
 
 
For their final assignment, students will carry out an individual research project consisting of a written paper (minimum 2000 words) and a ten-minute presentation to the class. The assignment is to select a topic related to Celtic music and/or dance, and to research and analyze the topic based on its stylistic, aesthetic, and structural elements, and its socio-cultural and historical contexts. The project may include field research, in which students interview a musician or dancer for example, or the research may be purely library-based. A major goal of the research and analysis is to understand and explain the meaning of "Celtic" in the chosen topic, both to the relevant artists and/or performers, and to the student as the researcher. Students will examine the ways that the artist(s), art form, art work, style, event, or scene expresses Celtic culture and identity. They will also consider the reception and impact of the artist(s), music, dance, event, scene, etc. on modern art and society. In researching a performance tradition, students might consider questions such as: What makes up a music group/community/scene? What does it mean to be a "regular," a session player, a dancer? From where do we draw creativity? Why do we perform, learn, teach? How do we listen? Why do we celebrate live music over mediated music, or vice versa? Who is the "we" of a music tradition? In researching a festival, a film, or other artwork, they might explore questions such as: What are the Celtic roots or other connections with Celtic history and culture? How is traditional culture made relevant to today's world? How do we express cultural identity through art, music, and dance? Why are Celtic music and dance so widely popular and attractive in the 21st century?
Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 
Course Outcome 4: Articulate and critically evaluate ideas and conclusions on the meaning of "Celtic music" based on evidence provided by authors.
 
 
Students will consider the following questions on Writing Assignment #1:
Sean Williams writes in Focus: Irish Traditional Music, “In the twenty-first century, [the term] “Celtic music” has become a modern construction emerging from a perceived shared identity in opposition to a dominant culture” (p.82). The cultural and musical traditions of this “shared identity” include Irish, Scottish, Welsh, Cornish, Manx, Breton, and Galician. Drawing on your readings and class discussions, what are the significant elements (historical, linguistic, artistic) that bring these regions together under the rubric “Celtic”? Identify and explain.
 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 
Course Outcome 2: Identify and apply the basic concepts and terms used in musical investigation to specific musical performances in Ireland, Scotland, and other "Celtic nations."
 
 
Students will respond to the following prompt on Writing Assignment #3:
Sean-nós is the old singing style of Ireland that continues today largely in the Gaeltacht (Irish-speaking) areas. Far more widespread in the Celtic regions are English-language ballads and songs. (a) Listen to these two performances of Irish sean-nós and English ballad, and compare the two performances in terms of performance practice and singing style. Contrast the social contexts in which the singing takes place, the emotional expression of the singers, the instrumental accompaniment, and the vocal characteristics of the two singing styles. How are the two traditions and social contexts similar and different? (b) In a separate paragraph, discuss some of the ways learning and performing popular music today differs from musical practices in these older traditions.
 
 
Course Outcome 5: Analyze the roles Celtic music and dance play in enhancing human social life.
 
 
The Táin Bó Cúailnge ("Cattle Raid of Cooley") is the longest and most important tale in the Ulster Cycle of Irish mythology, and one of the greatest prose sagas of the ancient world. The tale contains a number of references to musicians, songs, and poetic verse: for example, harpers (Carson, pp. 21, 26, 57); bards and poets (Carson, pp. 12-13, 123); and solo singing and chanting (Carson, pp. 26-27, 95, 97, 104, 124-127, 197-198). From your reading of this epic, what can we discern about the uses of music and the roles it played in ancient Celtic society? Draw broadly on these and other references in the text to discuss examples.
 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
0%
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
All seats are restricted to University Honors Program students.
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
No
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
None
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
None
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 

 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

Instructor is on a semester by semester contract.

1.Deepen their understanding of aesthetic, cultural, and historical dimensions of artistic traditions.


2.Strengthen their ability to interpret and make critical judgments about the arts through the analysis of structure, form, and style of specific works.


3.Strengthen their ability to create, recreate, or evaluate art based upon techniques and standards appropriate to the genre.


4.Identify and examine distinguishing characteristics, including ideas, values, images, cultural artifacts, economic structures, technological or scientific developments, and/or attitudes of people in a society or culture outside the United States.


Student Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will demonstrate that they are able to:


1. Interpret and analyze music on the basis of its structural, stylistic, and aesthetic elements and its social and historical contexts.


2. Identify and apply the basic concepts and terms used in musical investigation to specific musical performances in Ireland, Scotland, and other "Celtic nations."


3. Distinguish and evaluate the roles of music in expressing social identity.


4. Articulate and critically evaluate ideas and conclusions on the meaning of "Celtic music" based on evidence provided by authors.


5. Analyze the roles Celtic music and dance play in enhancing human social life.


6. Distinguish between disciplinary methodologies by which various aspects of musical cultures are understood, i.e. Musicology, Ethnomusicology, Anthropology, and Mythology.


7. Develop understanding between various aspects of a society, such as the relationship between music and social life (Anthropology).


8. Synthesize from these multiple perspectives a comprehensive sense of music in culture and music as culture in the Celtic world of the past and present.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Written Assignment60%See syllabus
Major Paper30%See syllabus
Attendance10%See syllabus

kkharris (Mon, 30 Jan 2017 21:13:46 GMT): Rollback: Courses tabled pending consultation with MUS.
gsklute (Tue, 31 Jan 2017 04:25:33 GMT): Rollback: Hi Alison, please add the IP outcomes and assessment. Thank you!
kkharris (Tue, 14 Feb 2017 16:25:17 GMT): Rollback: Rolled back for edits.
aeherget (Fri, 24 Mar 2017 12:47:04 GMT): AECHH: Uploading updated syllabus at instructor's request via email 3/24/2017.
aeherget (Mon, 03 Apr 2017 19:17:09 GMT): AECHH: Updating Contact hours to accurate reflect the seminar ratio at instructor's request via phone call 4/3/2017.
Key: 13353