Preview Workflow

Viewing: ENG 476 : Southern Literature

Last approved: Wed, 01 Apr 2015 09:45:05 GMT

Last edit: Wed, 01 Apr 2015 09:45:05 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
ENG (English)
476
008690
Dual-Level Course
No
Cross-listed Course
No
Southern Literature
Southern Lit
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
English (16ENG)
Term Offering
Fall Only
Offered Every Year
Spring 2015
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Michael Grimwood
Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecturen/an/aNon/a
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
No
Literary traditions of the Southeastern United States from colonization through the present, including study of such major writers as Byrd, Jefferson, Simms, Poe, Douglass, Twain, Chesnutt, Glasgow, Hurston, Tate, Wolfe, Faulkner, Warren, Wright, Welty, Williams, O'Conner, Percy, and Lee Smith.

n/a


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Humanities
US Diversity
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Students will interpret works of Southern Literature within their historical and cultural contexts.
 
 
Essay Questions on Exams:

Sample Question: According to Thadious Davis, writing is a way "to achieve personhood and independence from subjugation. Telling is a way to achieve authority and autonomy, and it is a way to make peace with the past." Discuss this idea in one or two works we have read in regards to race, class, or gender.
 
 
Students will analyze, evaluate, and/or synthesize different interpretations of literary texts.
 
 
Critical Essays:

Sample Question: Historian Margaret Ripley Wolfe has written that "southern women, by design or by default, have often found themselves shackled to pedestals." On the other hand, North Carolinian writer Reynolds Price argues that "southern women are Mack trucks disguised as powder puffs." Evaluate and/or synthesize these quotations in light of characters found in one or two works we have read.
 
 
Student will write well-developed critical essays about Southern Literature.
 
 
Two Critical Essays (7-10 pages)

Sample Topic: Analyze the racial and/or class conflict represented in Flannery O'Connor's "Revelation," Randall Kenan's "Foundations of the Earth" or Lillian Smith's "Killers of the Dream." Incorporate at least three substantial interpretative peer-reviewed essays or book chapters into your discussion.
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 
Students will be able to interpret a variety of texts from social, historical and cultural perspectives and to articulate how cultural and societal influences shape gender, racial, ethnic, and/or class identities.
 
 
Midterm and Final Exam Questions:

Sample Question: Drawing specific details from Richard Wright's "The Ethics of Living Jim Crow," define the term 'Jim Crow' and explain the cultural influences that shape his identity as a black man.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
Analyze various ways in which southern literature represents interactions between different religious, gender, ethnic, racial, class, sexual orientation, disability and/or age groups.
 
 
Two Critical Essays (7-10 pages):

Sample Topic: Analyze the racial and/or class conflict represented in Flannery O'Connor's "Revelation," Randall Kenan's "Foundations of the Earth" or Lillian Smith's "Killers of the Dream." Incorporate at least three substantial interpretative peer-reviewed essays or book chapters into your discussion.
Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
Student must have Sophomore standing and above
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
Yes.
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
None.
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
The Literature of the American South: A Norton Anthology
Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl by Linda Brent
As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner
Oral History by Lee Smith
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

n/a

Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Students will be able to interpret a variety of texts from social, historical and cultural perspectives, verbally articulating how identity is shaped by gender, ethnicity, race, class, and/or sexual orientation.

  2. Students will be able to analyze various ways in which southern literature represents interactions between different religious, gender, ethnic, racial, class, sexual orientation, disability and/ or age groups.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
participation10%n/a
essay40%Two Critical Essays 20% each
midterm25%n/a
final25%n/a
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Week One1 weekBrent, Linda: Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl
Week Two1 weekDouglas, Frederick, “Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave”

Chestnut, Mary Boykin, from Mary Chesnut’s Civil War

Harris, Joel Chandler, “Free Joe and the Rest of the World”
Week Three1 weekClemens, Samuel, from Life on the Mississippi

Chopin, Kate, “Desiree’s Baby” and “The Storm”
Week Four1 weekWashington, Booker T., from Up From Slavery

Chesnutt, Charles, “The Goophered Grapevine”
Week Five1 weekHurston, Zora Neale, “Sweat” and “How It Feels to be Colored Me”

Smith, Lillian, from Killers of the Dream

Wolfe, Thomas, from Look Homeward, Angel
Week Six1 weekThe Southern Agrarians, from I’ll Take My Stand

Warren, Robert Penn, “Blackberry Winter”

Wright, Richard, “The Ethics of Living Jim Crow”
Paper # 1 Due
Week Seven1 weekPorter, Katherine, “He”

Spencer, Elizabeth, “Sharon”

Welty, Eudora, “A Curtain of Green”
Week Eight1 weekJohnson, James Weldon, from The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man

Ellison, Ralph, from Invisible Man

Mid-term Exam
Week Nine1 weekMcCullers, Carson, from The Member of the Wedding

O’Connor, Flannery, “Revelation” and “A Good Man Is Hard to Find”
Week Ten1 weekFaulkner, William, As I Lay Dying
Week Eleven1 weekWilliams, Tennessee, A Streetcar Named Desire
Week Twelve1 weekGaines, Ernest J., “The Sky Is Gray”

Angelou, Maya, from I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings
Week Thirteen1 weekBetts, Doris, “The Ugliest Pilgrim”

Mason, Bobbie Ann, “Shiloh”

Allison, Dorothy, “from Trash
Week Fourteen1 weekRandall, “Foundations of the Earth”

Walker, Alice, “Everyday Use”

Paper # 2 Due
Week Fifteen1 weekSmith, Lee, Oral History
This course was approved by CUE 2.6.2015. Because portions were approved as the old GEP form, this form was filled out by OUCC, with syllabus and GEP form attached. Approval memos sent via email to Registration & Records and college liaisons.

GMN 2.10.2015
Key: 1417