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Viewing: BIT 480 / BIT 580 : Yeast Metabolic Engineering

Last approved: Thu, 08 Mar 2018 09:02:15 GMT

Last edit: Thu, 11 Jan 2018 19:48:46 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
Major
BIT (Biotechnology)
480
032547
Dual-Level Course
Yes
580
Cross-listed Course
No
Yeast Metabolic Engineering
Yeast Metabolic Engineering
College of Agriculture and Life Sciences
Biotechnology (11BIT)
Term Offering
Spring Only
Offered Alternate Years
Spring 2019
Previously taught as Special Topics?
Yes
1
 
Course Prefix/NumberSemester/Term OfferedEnrollment
BIT 495/595Yeast Metabolic Engineering13
BIT 495/595Yeast Metabolic Engineering17
BIT 495/595Yeast Metabolic Engineering12
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
2
8
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Laboratory5
Lecture2
Course Attribute(s)


If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Carlos Goller
Teaching Assistant Professor
assoc

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Laboratory1616NoNA
Lecture1616NoNA
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Prerequisite: BIT 410 or 510

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
No
Participants will be introduced to a variety of methods for using yeast to produce commercially relevant products. Topics will include cultivation, genetic manipulation to delete or replace genes, transformation, heterologous gene expression and codon optimization/gene synthesis. Various modern molecular cloning approaches and computational resources will be discussed. Students will apply gene manipulation approaches to engineer Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce beta-carotene and/or other relevant biotechnology products. This will be accomplished by assembling a series of optimized genes in the biosynthetic pathway using the versatile genetic assembly system (VEGAS) that exploits the capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to join sequences with terminal homology by homologous recombination. Expression will be compared by assembling libraries of transcriptional units with different promoters and using different genetic knock-outs as hosts. Additionally, computational modeling of metabolic processes will be used to assess perturbations to metabolic fluxes.

The BIT Yeast Metabolic Engineering course exposes students to methods for using yeast to produce valuable and often commercially-relevant products. This course is important for NC State students because it provides hands-on experience with yeast genetics and includes discussion of cutting-edge synthetic biology and genetic assembly systems. In lab, an in vivo recombination-based assembly system is used to construct the beta carotene pathway. This campus has numerous researchers working in the fields of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering for biofuels and pharmaceuticals. The BIT Yeast Metabolic Engineering course provides fundamental training that would benefit undergraduates and graduates interested in metabolic engineering and using yeast as a model system.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
No
GEP Categories

Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 

 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 

 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 

 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 

Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 

 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

College(s)Contact NameStatement Summary
College of EngineeringMichael FlickingerThank you for sending me the BIT 480/580 syllabus. This looks like a really good course! I see no conflict with BEC/CHE 577 as my overview course contains only a brief introduction to yeast molecular biology. I would also seek input from Driss Elhanafi and Caroline Smith-Moore who teach our BEC 440/540 and BEC 441/541 series courses on molecular biology systems used in biomanufacturing. Their email addresses are attached to this message. Best regards, Michael
College of EngineeringCaroline Smith-Moorehere is some overlap with BEC 440, as they do express an antibody fragment in yeast in that course. However, it may be different enough from the course you are proposing to not cause too much conflict.
College of EngineeringDriss Elhanafi(BEC440/540) there is no major overlap because our course is more for biomanufacturing and also we are intending to switch the Saccharomyces yeast to Pichia pastoris.
College of SciencesBetty GardnerGenetics thiks that these classes are fine and do not overlap significantly with courses we currently offer
College of SciencesJon OlsonMicrobiology has no concerns with BIT479.579 or BIT 480/580 overlapping any of our existing courses. I hope this has not caused any delay in course approval, I assumed no reply meant no concern.
Dr. Goller will be teaching this as part of his teaching semester requirements. The course has an in-lab section, which requires use of instrumentation in the biotechnology program. In addition, it will require the purchase of reagents to perform such experiments that are covered by BIT and a dedicated classroom and lab space.

Participants in the Yeast Metabolic Engineering course will learn to appreciate yeast as a genetically tractable model organism for the production of commercially relevant products.

 


Participants will understand the significance and potential of metabolic engineering in yeast and other organisms.


Participants will understand how gene deletions, codon-optimization, and modern gene assembly systems can be used with yeast's robust recombination system for the purpose of metabolic engineering.


Student Learning Outcomes

II. LEARNING OUTCOMES


Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of the course, participants will be able to:



  1. Design and troubleshoot experiments to grow and genetically manipulate Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    1. Verify the genotype of yeast strains

    2. Engineer constructs for overproduction of beta-carotene

    3. Transform yeast with recombinant DNA constructs

    4. Assess the viability of genetically engineered yeast

    5. Measure the intensity of pigmentation (beta-carotene) in different strains



  2. Interpret data associated with metabolic engineering of yeast

  3. Identify limitations and alternative approaches associated with metabolic engineering of yeast.


Learning Outcomes for Graduate Students (Final Project):



  1. Summarize applications of yeast metabolic engineering for sustainability-related projects (for example: food industry, chemicals, and fuels or remediation of the environment).

  2. Critically evaluate the use of yeast metabolic engineering for sustainability-related projects.

  3. Connect this research to current local, regional, state, and national needs and areas of economic and scientific growth.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Lab assignments10Undergraduate - Pre-Lab Assignments - see syllabus for description
Lab Report25Undergraduate - see syllabus for description
Lab assignments10Undergraduate - Lab Notebook - see syllabus for description

Quizzes10Undergraduate - see syllabus for description
Readings assignments10Undergraduate - see syllabus for description
presentation15Undergraduate - see syllabus for description
Exam20Undergraduate - see syllabus for description
Attendance-10Undergraduate - see syllabus for description
Lab assignments5Graduate - Pre-lab Assignments - see syllabus for description
Lab Report25Graduate - see syllabus for description
Lab assignments10Graduate - Lab Notebooks - see syllabus for description
Quizzes10Graduate - see syllabus for description
Readings assignments10Graduate - see syllabus for description
presentation15Graduate - Final Presentation - see syllabus for description
Final Exam10Graduate - see syllabus for description
Project15Graduate - Final Project - see syllabus for description
Attendance-10Graduate - see syllabus for description
mlnosbis 9/13/2017:
1) Suggest consultation with College of Sciences. Instructors' (Dr. Goller and Dr. Gordy) hiring department is Biological Sciences, so Sciences should be aware of the course even thought it will be offered in CALS. Contact Dr. John Blondin (blondin@ncsu.edu) to facilitate consultation, then paste consultation summary in the consultation summary field of the CIM form.
2) Also suggest consultation with the Biomanufacturing graduate program because of the overlap of yeast metabolic engineering with BEC/CHE 577. Contact DGP Dr. Michael Flickinger (mcflicki@ncsu.edu) for consultation and insert consultation summary on the CIM form.
3) Who is Dr. Claire Gordy in relation to the course? Unclear from the syllabus. If she is a second instructor, include her full contact information.
4) On syllabus under course structure, remove "Special Topics" from the course title.

pjharries - 9/12/2017 - missing course objectives/goals. Although the final project counts a bit more than the other course proposal, I would suggest making it more substantial both in terms of what's required and also in terms of proportion of the final grade.

mlnosbis 11/8/2017: Most comments were addressed, but the syllabus and CIM still do not have course goals. Please add course goals to both locations. The learning outcomes were updated as suggested on the syllabus, but not on the CIM form. Please update the CIM form to match the revised syllabus.

ABGS Reviewer Comments: 11/15/2017:
-It looks like all comments have been addressed. No other concerns.
aeherget (Wed, 30 Aug 2017 17:51:36 GMT): AECHH: Updating Credit/Contact hours to 2 lecture contact hours per conversation with the instructor 8/30/2017. Lab is non-self contained.
aeherget (Wed, 30 Aug 2017 17:57:27 GMT): AECHH: Uploading updated syllabus at instructor's request via email 8/30/2017.
aeherget (Thu, 07 Sep 2017 17:51:44 GMT): AECHH: Uploading updated syllabus at instructor's request via email 9/7/2017.
sedought (Mon, 25 Sep 2017 20:42:01 GMT): Course Consultation Response from Dr. Michael Flickinger: Hello Sabrina, Thank you for sending me the BIT 480/580 syllabus. This looks like a really good course! I see no conflict with BEC/CHE 577 as my overview course contains only a brief introduction to yeast molecular biology. I would also seek input from Driss Elhanafi and Caroline Smith-Moore who teach our BEC 440/540 and BEC 441/541 series courses on molecular biology systems used in biomanufacturing. Their email addresses are attached to this message. Best regards, Michael
sedought (Wed, 04 Oct 2017 20:28:23 GMT): Consultation from Caroline Smith-Moore (BEC 441/541) There is some overlap with BEC 440, as they do express an antibody fragment in yeast in that course. However, it may be different enough from the course you are proposing to not cause too much conflict. Consultation from Driss Elhanafi (BEC440/540) there is no major overlap because our course is more for biomanufacturing and also we are intending to switch the Saccharomyces yeast to Pichia pastoris.
sedought (Wed, 04 Oct 2017 20:35:35 GMT): Comment addressed: pjharries - 9/12/2017 - missing course objectives/goals. Although the final project counts a bit more than the other course proposal, I would suggest making it more substantial both in terms of what's required and also in terms of proportion of the final grade. The graduate project for the eight-week Yeast Metabolic Engineering course consists of a report discussing the use of metabolic engineering for sustainable production of foods and biofuels. The report includes a literature review and connecting the topic to state, local, and campus-wide initiatives using yeast as a host for production of valuable substances. The project is worth 15% of the graduate grade, and this reflects the amount of work required to complete the project. The report is short and the grading rubric details exactly what elements are required. We believe that in a fast-paced 8-week course such as Yeast Metabolic Engineering with several grade items due at the end of the module, a final graduate project worth 15% is appropriate.
sedought (Tue, 07 Nov 2017 22:00:50 GMT): We contacted Jane Lubischer in the COS for approval. She had Betty Gardner and Jon Olson review our courses. Here are there comments: Hi All, Genetics thiks that these classes are fine and do not overlap significantly with courses we currently offer. Best, Betty HI Sabrina, Microbiology has no concerns with BIT479.579 or BIT 480/580 overlapping any of our existing courses. I hope this has not caused any delay in course approval, I assumed no reply meant no concern.
Key: 15777