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Viewing: MAE 703 : Direct Energy Conversion

Last approved: Sat, 24 Mar 2018 08:00:22 GMT

Last edit: Fri, 23 Mar 2018 20:42:53 GMT

Change Type
Major
MAE (Mechanical & Aerospace Engr)
703
014445
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Direct Energy Conversion
Direct Energy Conv
College of Engineering
Mechanical & Aerospace Engr (14MAE)
Term Offering
Spring Only
Offered Every Year
Fall 2018
Previously taught as Special Topics?
Yes
3
 
Course Prefix/NumberSemester/Term OfferedEnrollment
MAE 589Fall 201318
MAE 589Fall 201411
MAE 589Spring 20168
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded/Audit
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3
Course Attribute(s)


If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Brendan O'Connor
Associate Professor
full

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture1212NoNone
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote


Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
No
The course is intended to be an introduction to fundamentals of energy transport and energy conversion concepts from nano to macro scales. The course will cover the state of energy carriers (photons, electrons, and phonons) and their transport characteristics. A focus will be on material properties that dictate energy related processes. The foundational concepts will then be applied to direct energy conversion devices including thermoelectrics and photovoltaics. Finally, the course will cover system analysis of solid-state energy conversion applications.

This course provides many graduate mechanical engineering students with their first exposure to solid-state energy conversion devices and associate scientific principles. This course is highly complementary to thermodynamics, and statistical thermodynamics offered in the department. Concepts that are related to solid state physics are described that are often new to mechanical engineering graduate students. These concepts are then applied to understand direct energy conversion technologies such as thermoelectrics. Energy conversion is an important aspect of mechanical engineering, and this course covers an important aspect of energy conversion not covered in the graduate MAE curriculum. 


No

Is this a GEP Course?
GEP Categories

Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 

 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 

 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 

 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 

Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 

 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

This course will be taught through lectures and homework assignments. The students will be tested on their knowledge through exams and a project.

Students will be asked to demonstrate their knowledge of the material covered in this course through their mastery of the following course objectives:



  1. Understand the concepts of energy quanta including photons, excitons, and phonons

  2. Understand how Schrodinger equation is able to determine energy levels of confined systems

  3. Understand the concept of density of states of electrons, phonons, and photons

  4. Understand dispersion relations of energy carriers and implications in energy conversion

  5. Apply Boltzmann transport equation to analyze energy transport at microscales

  6. Be able to describe wave propagation in thin films (light and heat)

  7. Understand key concepts of energy conversion in solar cells

  8. Understand the various approaches used to harness solar energy

  9. Understand the fundamental energy conversion principles of thermoelectric devices

  10. Be able to perform performance analysis of thermoelectric devices

  11. Understand the basic operating principle of batteries


Student Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, the students will be able to:


1. Apply Schrodinger's equation to describe the state of energy carriers in simple systems such as a quantum well.


2. Describe crystal structures and interpret X-ray diffraction patterns and ascribe relevant Miller Indices.   


3. Explain for electron energy states in solids and the origin of an energy band gap.


4. Determine the density of states of electronis and phonons in simple periodic potential systems


5. Derive the fundamental efficiency limit of solar photovoltaic energy conversion based on semiconductors using the principle of detailed balance. 


6. Describe how a p-n junction solar cell works and primary places of efficiency losses


7. Optimize anti-reflection coatings for use in solar cells. 


8. Describe the origin of the Peltier effect and Seebeck coefficient. 


9. Apply Boltzmann transport equation to describe thermal conductivity in solids.


10. Describe the basic principles of thermoelectric operation.


11. Calculate the performance of thermoelectric modules in clearly defined systems


12. Describe the basic principles of fuel cell and battery energy conversion. 


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Multiple exams40/1002 in class exams
Homework15/1008 homework assignments
Final Exam30/100comprehensive exam
Project15/100Individually written report
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Introduction and energy landscapeWeek 1Overview of energy conversion, where the class fits, and larger energy landscape in the US and the world.
Microscopic view of energy carriersWeek 2
Basics of quantum mechanicsweek 3
Crystal structure and diffraction week 4
Electron energy statesweek 5
Phonon energy statesweek 6
Density of states and statistical distributionsweek 7
Density of states and statistical distributions 2Week 8
Solar Energy introductionWeek 9
Photovoltaics, p-n junctionsweek 10
Optics and solar energy conversionweek 11
Thermoelectric principlesweek 12
Thermoelectric principles 2Week 13
Boltzmann transport equationWeek 14
Fuel cells and batteriesWeek 15
Comment from CIM administrators: Is there any reason why this course is numbered 700-level when the only requirement is graduate standing? You might want to be more restrictive or list pre-requisite or co-requisite courses.

Response: It is my understanding that 700 level courses do not require prerequisites. The number is simply an indication of an advanced topic. Furthermore, MAE department is implementing a new policy of requiring PhD students to take a certain number of 700 level courses and transitioning a number of 500 level courses to 700 level. This course would fit under the loose guidelines distinguishing 500 and 700.

mlnosbis 7/5/2017:
1) Contact hours should be whole numbers
2) Prerequisite field should show "None" because 700-level courses are already restricted to graduate standing.
3) Course objectives/goals should be broad goals for the course. Student learning outcomes are more specific goals. Edit course objectives/goals to be more broad goals for the course.
4) Syllabus notes-
a-include price of textbooks
b-elaborate on course structure
c-include the instructor's policy on late assignments
d-include NC State's general PRR statement (item 14 from the Graduate Syllabus Checklist)
e-include breakdown of how grades are determined
f-the course schedule should not include a homework column if nothing is listed for any of the weeks

pjharrie 7/14/17 - I've got nothing to add to Melissa's comments

Response:
1) Updated as requested.
2) Updated as requested.
3) Updated as requested.
4)
a. Updated
b. Updated
c. Updated
d. Added.
e. Updated
f. This is left blank as it is filled in throughout the semester. It keeps the format simple and allows flexibility. I can delete if necessary. I have added a note that says that it is to be filled out as the semester progresses.

cohen (02/22/2018):
There are two areas that should be addressed on the syllabus.

1. When applicable, the syllabus should have the conversion scale from numerical grades to letter grades. That's item 10b under the syllabus requirement for graduate courses. See:
https://projects.ncsu.edu/grad/handbook/sections/3.19-graduate-courses.html#I
2. The Student Learning Outcomes should also appear on the syllabus. Those can be pasted from the ones in CIM.

Response (02/27/18)
In response to Cohen:
1. Added.
2. Added.

ABGS Reviewer Comments 3/19/2018:
-No concerns
ro (Mon, 03 Jul 2017 14:05:20 GMT): Rollback: Brendan, please change the effective date to Spring 2018. Is there any reason why this course is numbered 700-level when the only requirement is graduate standing? You might want to be more restrictive or list pre-requisite or co-requisite courses.
btoconno (Tue, 20 Feb 2018 03:31:35 GMT): I updated the effective date to Fall 2018. This course is numbered 700-level as it covers advanced topics that I felt warranted the distinction. There are no specific prerequisites, but the course does consider advanced topics in heat transfer, thermodynamics, and materials science that it should be listed as 700 over 500.
Key: 16852