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Viewing: MAE 520 / MAE 420 : Dynamic Analysis of Human Movement

Last approved: Mon, 12 Mar 2018 08:00:28 GMT

Last edit: Wed, 07 Mar 2018 15:42:52 GMT

Change Type
Major
MAE (Mechanical & Aerospace Engr)
520
032571
Dual-Level Course
Yes
420
Cross-listed Course
No
Dynamic Analysis of Human Movement
Movement Dynamics
College of Engineering
Mechanical & Aerospace Engr (14MAE)
Term Offering
Spring Only
Offered Every Year
Spring 2018
Previously taught as Special Topics?
Yes
2
 
Course Prefix/NumberSemester/Term OfferedEnrollment
MAE589Fall 201525
MAE589Spring 201710
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded/Audit
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3
Course Attribute(s)


If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Katherine Saul
Associate Professor
full

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture2020NoNA
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
P: MAE208 with a grade of C or better
P: MAE208 or equivalent
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
No
Topics in movement biomechanics and computational analyses of movement, including muscle physiology and mechanics, advanced muscle modeling, neural control of muscle and motor control theories, and dynamic simulation and optimization. Discussion of fundamental research underpinnings and clinical and sports applications.

This course addresses a gap in the current catalog, introducing biomechanics topics to the MAE department, and integrating mechanical analysis and computational tools to model musculoskeletal and neuromuscular systems. It also provides practical training in the tools available to study these systems and the foundational literature in this field. In the graduate course level, the students will also apply these foundations to design and propose new studies, to synthesize and evaluate existing research and develop writing and proposal skills.


There are no existing courses in MAE or BME that duplicate this course content. Consulted with Biomedical Engineering DGS (Gallippi) and other biomechanics instructors in BME (Franz, Cole) to confirm no substantial overlap with existing course offerings. No overlap exists at undergrad or graduate level. See statement in email from Gallippi (attached). A summary statement with specific details follows.


The content of the proposed course 420/520 has been evaluated in light of other courses covering biomechanics concepts within BME. There are two other pertinent biomechanics courses within BME that also cover musculoskeletal biomechanics concepts; as a group these classes offer complementary, but not redundant material. BME 441/541, offered at NCSU, covers concepts in orthopaedic biomechanics. Emphasis is on tissue mechanics and mechanobiology, lab techniques, and biological descriptions of the tissue and methods for understanding tissue loading. BMME 405/505 is offered on the UNC campus, but is mentioned here due to the joint nature of the BME program. This course also includes mechanics of musculoskeletal tissues, and describes methods for analyzing locomotion mechanics. While several of the topics are complementary, the proposed MAE 420/520 emphasizes the mathematical modeling and dynamic simulation of biological concepts underpinning nerve and muscle function, and whole body muscle coordination and motor control, as well as the historical basis for modeling at scales from molecular to whole body; analytical approaches and computational programming and simulation is a significant portion of the course. There is no mathematical modeling or simulation component to any of the other courses. Further, MAE students are unlikely to enroll in the UNC course BMME405/505 given its location at UNC.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
No
GEP Categories

Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
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Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 

 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 

 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 

 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 

Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 

 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

College(s)Contact NameStatement Summary
College of EngineeringCaterina Gallippi (BME)Consulted with Biomedical Engineering DGS (Gallippi) to confirm no substantial overlap with existing course offerings. No overlap exists at undergrad or graduate level.
College of EngineeringYahya Fathi (ISE)Consulted with ISE DGS (Fathi) to confirm no substantial overlap with existing course offerings. No substantial overlap exists.
College of Agriculture and Life SciencesPaul Mozdziak (Physiology)Consulted with Physiology DGS (Mozdziak) to confirm no substantial overlap with existing course offerings. No substantial overlap exists.
This course will be taught under Dr. Saul's existing course load of 2 undergraduate and 1 graduate course per year. No additional resources are required.

1) Provide evidence for the biological, mechanical, and neurological mechanisms underlying movement production

2) Describe the engineering tools that are used to study movement and explain their

applications, pros, and cons

3) Introduce methods for developing engineering models of human movement at multiple scales (e.g. tissue, organ, whole body), both analytically and computationally, as well as historical information regarding the development and discovery of these models.


4) Graduate students: Provide guidance for accessing and evaluating the literature, identifying gaps in the literature, and designing an effective research study.


Student Learning Outcomes

After completing this course, students will be able to:

1) Describe the biological, mechanical, and neurological aspects of how muscles

produce movement

2) Identify the engineering tools that are used to study movement and explain their

function

3) Create and solve engineering models of human movement analytically and

computationally


4) Graduate students: Synthesize existing literature on a chosen topic area and propose new research to fill an existing gap.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Multiple exams30%2 midterms
Final Exam15%Cumulative
Homework40%Analysis and modeling assignments (homework and miniprojects)
Project15%For graduate students only; see attached syllabus for the weighting of grades for the undergaduates
Attached syllabus has two sections: MAE520 (graduate details) and MAE420 (undergraduate details). Only the project information and weighting of grades differ between the documents. Details about example meeting and office hour times, assignments, project, and the final (cumulative) have been added to the syllabus. Consultations from BME, ISE, and physiology are now provided to document that there is no conflict with existing courses. Dynamics is a prerequisite for all students - I have included "or equivalent" for the specific course number for graduate students.

mlnosbis 1/12/2018:
1) I see the consultation from BME that is in support of the course, but has the ISE department been consulted? According to the catalog, they have several courses that address the topic of biomechanics (541, 543, 544, 742, 768). Please consult that department head (Julie Swann, jlswann@ncsu.edu) or DGP (Yahya Fathi, fathi@ncsu.edu) to obtain a consultation, and paste that in the consultation summary field of the CIM form. I also suggest a consultation from the Physiology DGP, Paul Mozdziak (pemozdzi@ncsu.edu).
2) Syllabus notes:
- Include suggested meeting time. We need to see how often the course is meeting to determine the appropriate credit hours
- Instructor's office hours should not be TBD. By appointment is acceptable.
- Include more information about each assignment. What are the modeling assignments? Is the final cumulative? What is the final project for graduate students- is this a literature review?

cohen (1/24/2018):
Is the prereq. (MAE208 with a grade of C or better) the prereq for the graduate students as well as the undergraduate students or just for the undergraduate students? Resolved.

ABGS Reviewer Comments 2/19/2018:
-No concerns.
dwparish (Fri, 20 Oct 2017 13:37:54 GMT): Rollback: Fixes required as per comments at CCC
jredward (Fri, 20 Oct 2017 20:34:48 GMT): Rollback: Changes need to be made per CCC review
aeherget (Tue, 19 Dec 2017 19:03:50 GMT): AECHH: Uploading updated syllabus at instructor's request via email 12/19/2017.
aeherget (Thu, 11 Jan 2018 14:42:28 GMT): AECHH: Uploading updated syllabus at instructor's request via email (1/10/2018) based on friendly suggestions from UCCC 1/10/2018.
Key: 18533