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Viewing: REL 220 : Religion in the Contemporary World

Last approved: Thu, 22 Mar 2018 08:00:27 GMT

Last edit: Tue, 20 Mar 2018 11:56:25 GMT

Change Type
Major
REL (Religious Studies)
220
032583
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Religion in the Contemporary World
Religion in Contemp World
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Philosophy and Religion (16PHI)
Term Offering
Fall and Spring
Offered Upon Demand
Fall 2018
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Mary Kathleen Cunningham
Associate Professor of Religious Studies

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture4545NoNone
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote


Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16RELSTBAB. A. in Religious StudiesElective
16RSMMinor in Religious StudiesElective
Engagement of diverse religious traditions with the contemporary world. Examination of topics such as religion and the environment, science, women and gender, the state, justice and conflict.

During an April 2016 meeting with the Provost to discuss the External Review of the department, the Provost remarked on the increased importance, given contemporary geopolitical circumstances, of an appreciation of the diversity and relevance of religious traditions. The Religious Studies faculty agree, and this course will, at the introductory, entry level, increase their contribution to the implicit goal while also serving as another mode of invitation to prospective majors and minors.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Global Knowledge
Humanities
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
By the end of the course, students will be able to explain the engagement of diverse religious traditions with the contemporary world, with attention to both the impact of recent historical and cultural developments on the formulation of religions and the role that religions have played in shaping societal attitudes and mores. [This is also a course learning outcome.]
 
 
Short writing assignments and examination questions. (Ex. Compare and contrast dominion, stewardship, and community of creation paradigms of the human relationship to the natural world. Discuss and evaluate Elizabeth Johnson’s claim that the community of creation model will best promote the long-­‐‑term goal of “a socially just and environmentally sustainable society in which the needs of all people are met and diverse species can prosper.”)
 
 
By the end of the course, students will be able to analyze and apply the various methodologies and research strategies and techniques that undergird the academic study of religion. [This is also a course learning outcome.]
 
 
Short writing assignments and examination questions. (Ex. Amina Wadud concludes her examination of Qur’anic selections with the claim that “the Qur’anic guidance can be logically and equitably applied to the lives of humankind in whatever era, if the Qur’anic interpretation continues to be rendered by each generation in a manner which reflects its whole intent.” (104) What does she mean by this methodological principle, and what evidence does she cite to support it?)
 
 
By the end of the course, students will be able to analyze and evaluate diversified religious proposals. [This is also a course learning outcome.]
 
 
Short writing assignments and examination questions. (Ex. Discuss and evaluate Arthur Peacocke’s proposal to reconcile divine action with an evolutionary world.)
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 
By the end of the course, students will be able to describe and interpret contemporary developments in religious thought in societies or cultures outside the United States.
 
 
Short writing assignments and examination questions. (Ex. Latin American liberation theologian Gustavo Gutierrez describes his reading of the Bible as “militant.” What does he mean by this characterization of his interpretive strategy, and how is his approach reflected in his understanding of salvation as liberation? What relationship does he see between theology and the practice of political justice?)
 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 
By the end of the course, students will be able to relate contemporary developments in religious thought to their cultural and/or historical contexts in the non-­‐‑U.S. society.
 
 
Short writing assignments and examination questions. (Ex. Discuss how Leonardo Boff unites liberation theology and ecological discourse in contemporary Latin American society.)
 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100%
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
NA
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
NA
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
None
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
None
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
See attached syllabus.
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
I. RELIGION AND THE ENVIRONMENT (JEWISH AND CHRISTIAN PERSPECTIVES)
II. RELIGION AND SCIENCE: CHRISTIANITY AND EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY
III. RELIGION AND WOMEN (JEWISH, CHRISTIAN AND MUSLIM PERSPECTIVES): The Image of Woman in the Accounts of Creation: Jewish and Christian Perspectives / Human Creation in the Qur’an: Muslim Perspectives on Women
IV. RELIGION AND SOCIAL JUSTICE: Latin American Liberation Theology / Black Theology
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
None
Course staffing will initially be accomplished by having REL 220 Religion in the Contemporary World replace one of the two sections of REL 317 Christianity that the instructor now teaches each Fall and Spring semester. If demand warrants, expanded offerings will be considered, as staffing allows.

As noted, the Objectives for GEP-HUM and GEP-GK are the course objectives.


Student Learning Outcomes

1. Explain the engagement of diverse religious traditions with the contemporary world, with attention to both the impact of recent historical and cultural developments on the formulation of religions and the role that religions have played in shaping societal attitudes and mores. 

2. Analyze and apply the various methodologies and research strategies and techniques that undergird the academic study of religion. 

3. Analyze and evaluate diversified religious proposals. 

4. Describe and interpret contemporary developments in religious thought in societies or cultures outside the United States.

5. Relate contemporary developments in religious thought to their cultural and/or historical contexts in the non-U.S. society.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Participation5See syllabus for rubric
Short Paper5Nine 250-500 word assignments to help prepare for participation in class.
Multiple exams602 take-home exams @30%
Final Exam30Take-home final exam
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
RELIGION AND THE ENVIRONMENT (JEWISH AND CHRISTIAN PERSPECTIVES)4 weeksSee syllabus
RELIGION AND SCIENCE: CHRISTIANITY AND EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY3 weeksSee syllabus
RELIGION AND WOMEN (JEWISH, CHRISTIAN AND MUSLIM PERSPECTIVES)4 weeksSee syllabus
RELIGION AND SOCIAL JUSTICE4 weeksSee syllabus

Key: 19758