Viewing: FPS 710 / TC 710 : Science of Dye Chemistry, Dyeing, Printing and Finishing

Last approved: Thu, 29 Nov 2018 19:46:58 GMT

Last edit: Thu, 29 Nov 2018 19:44:56 GMT

Changes proposed by: amelsha
Change Type
Major
FPS (Fiber and Polymer Science)
710
032690
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
Yes
Course Prefix:
TC
Science of Dye Chemistry, Dyeing, Printing and Finishing
Dyeing, Printing, Finishing
College of Textiles
Textile Engineering Chemistry & Science (18TEC)
14.2801
Textile Sciences and Engineering.
Term Offering
Fall and Spring
Offered Alternate Years
Spring 2019
Previously taught as Special Topics?
Yes
5
 
Course Prefix/NumberSemester/Term OfferedEnrollment
FPS 792Spring 201114
FPS 792Spring 20137
FPS 792Fall 201420
FPS 792Spring 201610
FPS792Fall 201714
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded/Audit
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3
Course Attribute(s)


If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Ahmed El-Shafei
Professor
Graduate Faculty

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture15N/ANoIt has been taught successfully for many years, and it has been normally populated with master and Ph.D. students.
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing and C or better in CH221 or CH225 and CH223 or CH227
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
?Fiber and Polymer ScienceElective
The primary course purpose is to gain a strong fundamental understanding of the chemistry and technology of preparation, dyes, dyeing and finishes. Emphasis will be on the chemistry of different bleach activators, surfactants, photophysics and photochemistry of FWAs, modulations of dyes structures to influence color, tinctorial strength, light fastness, wash fastness and aggregation. Chemistry of different dye classes will be studied with emphasis on structure-property relationships and dye-fiber interactions. Dyeing isotherms (Nernst and Langmuir), kinetics of dyeing with emphasis on derivation of Nernst and Langmuir based on thermodynamics and kinetics principles will be covered with practical examples of dyeing at different temperature and how to calculate thermodynamic parameters of dyeing (entropy, standard affinity and isotherm constants of Nernst and Langmuir). Chemistry of different finishes, including soil release, chemistry of flame retardants and mechanisms of flame retardancy, antimicrobial and water and oil repellency, will be covered with emphasis on structure-property relationships.

FPS 792 (Theory and Fundamentals of Chemistry and Technology of Dyes, Dyeing, Printing and Finishing), an optional qualifying course for the FPS PhD program, has been taught successfully for many years, and it has been normally populated with master and Ph.D. students. Hence, it is important that we make it a permanent course in the FPS Program.


Enrollment last 5 years


S11                 14


S13                 7


F14                 20


S16                 10


F17                 14


No

Is this a GEP Course?
GEP Categories

Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 

 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 

 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 

 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 

Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 

 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

Class has been taught several times as a special topics course as part of the faculty member's normal instructional load. Hence, no new resources are required.

The primary course purpose is to gain a strong fundamental understanding of the chemistry and technology of preparation, different dye classes, photostability of dyes, dyeing, dyeing isotherms (Nernst and Langmuir), kinetics of dyeing, printing and finishes (water and oil repellency, soli release flame retardancy mechanisms, antimicrobial), including:



  1. Preparation: slashing, scouring, bleaching (oxidative, reductive and chemistry of bleach activators) and mercerization

  2. Chemistry, photochemistry and photophysics of UV absorbers and FWA

  3. Chemistry of color and structural-properties relationships

  4. Chemistry of different dye classes and dyeing using:  natural dyes, direct dyes, azoic dyes, vat dyes (anthraquinoid and indigoid), sulfur dyes, reactive dyes, disperse dyes, acid dyes, basic dyes

  5. How to dye blends

  6. Thermodynamics and kinetics of dyeing; derivations of Nernst and Langmuir isotherms based on thermodynamics and kinetic principles; practical dyeing problems and how to correct errors in shades

  7. Chemistry of pigments and printing processes

  8. Color control in the supply chain

  9. Chemistry of finishes (flame retardancy, durable press, water/oil repellency, soil release, and antimicrobial) of textiles; environmental issues.


Student Learning Outcomes

By the time the students finish the course, they should be able to: :



  • Describe thoroughly the chemistry and technologies of textile preparation (slashing, desizing, scouring, bleaching and mercerization); different machineries (batch & continuous)

  • Calculate : % dye shade, LR, %DAO, % concentration of chemical in the bath; % wet pickup; practical preparation and dyeing problems  

  • Analyze with the aid of chemical structures the chemistry of nonionic, anionic and cationic bleach activators; compare the reaction mechanism and kinetics of peracid versus peroxides; hydrolysis versus perhydrolysis

  • Explain photophysics of additives (FWA and UV absorbers) and their intermolecular interactions with fibers and dyes

  • Explain and analyze the chemistry of colors (absorption of light in organic compounds; chromophore, auxochromes, push-pull phenomenon); technical criteria for dye design

  • Compare and analyze the chemistry and technologies of textile dyeing including chemistry of different dye classes (direct, azoic, vat, indigo, sulfur, basic, acid, reactive);

  • Explain thoroughly different dye-fiber interactions and fixation mechanisms for the various textile dye classes

  • Analyze and explain structure-properties relationship, fastness properties and photostability of each dye class

  • Analyze the classification of and approaches to the dyeing of fabric blends

  • Synthesize, with the aid of chemical equations and reaction mechanisms, dyes from different dye classes

  • Compare and analyze different approaches to enhancing the fastness properties of different dye classes for textiles

  • Describe the chemistry of pigments; differences between dyes and pigments and dyeing versus printing of textiles

  • Explain the role of chemical auxiliaries in dyeing and printing of textiles

  • Describe the commercial printing methods used for textiles and advantages and disadvantages of each

  • Explain and analyze the chemistry, reaction mechanisms and technologies of textile finishes including chemistry and application of durable press, antimicrobial, flame retardancy, water/oil repellency and soil release

  • Explain how to molecularly engineer dyes that carry finishing functionalities such as antimicrobial and/or fluid repellency etc.

  • Describe the use of high-density atmospheric plasma and UV treatment to graft polymerize different chemistries to achieve different surface chemistry functionalities

  • Explain the chemical structure-properties relationship of dyes and fibers

  • Explain the chemistry of different chemical finishes and how they are applied to textiles, using conventional textile wet and atmospheric plasma processes, to achieve different surface chemistry functionalities


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Multiple exams45%Three tests
Homework25%Homework
Quizzes5%In class quizzes
presentation10%Final presentation and one-page critique.
Final Exam15%Cumulative final exam
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Overview1 lectureCourse Policies; Overview of Textile Wet Processes
Preparation2 lecturesOverview of Preparation, Preparation Processes (slashing, desizing), Preparation Processes (scouring, bleaching), and Machinery (for batch and continuous)
Bleach activators3 lecturesChemistry of bleach activators including anionic, cationic, and nonionic, Chemistry of bleach activators including anionic, cationic, and nonionic, Chemistry of bleach activators (peracid generation versus peroxide; hydrolysis versus perhydrolysis)
Mercerization
Photophysics1 lectureChemistry and photophysics of fluorescent brighteners and UV Absorbers
Chemisry of Color1 lectureChemistry of colors (absorption of light in organic compounds; chromophore, auxochromes, push-pull phenomenon); overview of coloration; natural dyes
Cotton dyeing3 lecturesCotton dyeing: direct dyes and how the dye molecular structure impacts fastness properties and color yield, Cotton dyeing (chemistry of formation of colored molecules in the fiber): azoic; vat, indigo, and sulfur dyes (leuco form versus oxidized form generation, fastness properties); why is indigo called the KING of dyes? Cotton and protein fibers dyeing: reactive dyes including DCT, MCT, and vinyl sulfone dyes; a comparison between the different reactive forms will be discussed, and the interrelationship among different reactive forms, hydrolysis, fixation and environmental impacts will be discussed.
Disperse dyes2 lecturesChemistry of disperse dyes and dyeing polyesters (atmospheric dyeing; pressure dyeing; thermosol dyeing), Structure-properly relationships of disperse dyes; thermodynamics of disperse dyeing (Nernst Isotherm)
Basic dyes2 lecturesChemistry of basic dyes, dyeing and controlling rate of dye strike: Chemistry of acid dyes, dyeing and controlling rate of dye strike, Structure-property relationships of basic dyes; Structure-property relationships of acid dyes
Reactive dyes2 lecturesStructure-property relationships of basic dyes; Structure-property relationships of acid dyes
Blends dyeing1 lectureBlends dyeing
Pigments1 lectureChemistry of pigments; printing processes
Color1 lectureColor control in the supply chain; color spaces, color differences, color measurements and color matching
Finishes2 lecturesChemistry and applications of flame retardant finishes; Chemistry and applications of durable press finishes and antimicrobial finishes, Chemistry and applications of water/oil repellency and soil release/ use of atmospheric plasma and UV treatment for value added textiles
Presentations1 lectureFinal presentations
Review2 lecturesCourse review
mlnosbis 9/5/2018:
1) Effective date must be a future semester, after Fall 2018
2) The last student learning outcome does not have an action verb at the beginning
3) It doesn't look like this overlaps with any content in the College of Design, because this course focuses on the science rather than the design. No consultation needed.
4) Syllabus notes:
- Use new course number FPS/TC 710
- Use new title, not "Special Topics"
- Include price of texts, even though they are not required (Note that Hunt Library is misspelled)
- Make sure to include all PRRs that are listed on the Graduate Course Syllabus Checklist (attached under Additional Documentation), especially items 12 and 14.

cohen (9/5/2018):
1. I made a trivial correction to the following learning outcome in CIM:
Explain how to molecularly engineer dyes that carry finishing functionalities such as antimicrobial
and/or fluid repellency etc.
by adding the word "as" after such. If you agree with that correction, please correct the syllabus as well. If you do not agree with that correction, please delete "as" in CIM.
2. In the syllabus under Tests, do you mean for the > symbols to be greater than or equal to symbols? For example, what are you guaranteed if you get a score of 60?
3. Under Missed Tests, what happens if you have a problem and can't get a memo to the instructor within two days (for example, if you are in the hospital)?
4. In the syllabus under Laptop Computers and Cell Phones, please correct the first sentence.
5. The link under Course Evaluation on the syllabus is an old link. More importantly, the idea of offering an incentive can lead to evaluations that lack thoughtful reflection. (Note that the practice is in violation of 5.2 of Reg 05.20.10.)

ABGS Reviewer Comments 10/29/2018:
-My only reaction is to ask whether they really need to have 19 separate student learning outcomes. That is going to be awful difficult to evaluate once learning assessment time comes around.
-It seems to me that the FPS 710 CIM submission has some challenges related to punctuation (which made it a bit hard to read)
-In the activity section of the Topical Outline/Course Schedule there were mostly descriptions of topics rather than activities (I am assuming they mean Lecture on the topic that was described)
-The statement 'If excused absences are accepted, a makeup date of missed homeworks or quizzes is identified no later than a week from the due date of the assignment.' on the syllabus is confusing to me - why wouldn't an excused absence be accepted?
-I think it is odd to have a mix of monetary units ($ and £) in the course textbook section but I guess it is not a problem since it is on reserve in the library.
-Title needs to be corrected (there are two ofs in the title).
-Do they need a SIS program code? NO because it is listed as an elective.
-The first course objective/ goal should be restated to improve clarity. It is too long for a single goal. For the second goal writing a paper should not be included. Writing a paper is not a course goal but rather an assignment to demonstrate whether a student has achieved a particular learning goal.
mpasqui (Wed, 15 Nov 2017 21:12:11 GMT): Rollback: Syllabus has some items that are out of compliance with university policy. Can a shorter course name be developed? Such as the "Science of Coloration and Finishing"?
mpasqui (Wed, 06 Dec 2017 20:56:51 GMT): Rollback: Pre-reqs don't match in syllabus and in CIM. Also I think they should be rethought, as a TE student would not typically have the chemistry background that seems to be required for success in this course, and an FPS student may not either.
ecmoran (Tue, 19 Dec 2017 15:31:41 GMT): Rollback: Rolling back at the request of Dept Chair and DGP. Further discussion needed.
jrust (Tue, 19 Dec 2017 16:06:45 GMT): Rollback: Concerns from the DH.
jjoine (Tue, 19 Dec 2017 16:17:13 GMT): Rollback: 1. This class should be q crosslisted with TC. THis will make it easier for our MS TC students as this a very chemistry oriented class. 2. THe learning outcomes are not in the proper form and do not read properly. Also, at the PhD Level, I would expect to be on the upper end of Blooms Taxonomy. They also have to be measurable. http://tll.mit.edu/help/intended-learning-outcomes 2
mpasqui (Wed, 03 Jan 2018 02:46:59 GMT): Rollback: See comments from Jeff
Key: 19869
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