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Viewing: HI 217 : Caribbean History

Last approved: Fri, 09 Feb 2018 09:02:23 GMT

Last edit: Thu, 08 Feb 2018 16:30:11 GMT

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HI (History)
217
032558
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Caribbean History
Caribbean History
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
History (16HI)
Term Offering
Fall Only
Offered Every Year
Fall 2018
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Ebony Jones
Assistant Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture7070NoN/A
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote


Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16HISTBAHistory BA (History Breadth I)Elective
16HISTBSHistory BS (History Breadth I)Elective
16HIMHistory MinorElective
16ABY 2097 GRP502Humanities & Social Sciences History 1Elective
Exploration of the social, economic, political, intellectual, and cultural histories of the Caribbean. Major course topics include pre-Columbian indigeneity, colonization & imperialism, plantation slavery, abolition & emancipation, the Haitian and Cuban Revolutions, gender & migration, and decolonization & independence. The course emphasizes the diversity of the region and places the islands of the Caribbean within the wider context of a modern globalizing world.

The history of the Caribbean region provides high value for understandings of the development of global economies and transnational political thought. This course seeks to provide students with a foundational understanding of why Caribbean history is important and the ways in which the region is directly connected to the development of Western society. While the University offers courses on Latin America, there are no courses that solely focus on the distinctive history of the Caribbean region and its peoples. The course will add to the diversity of our regional geotemporal survey courses (required of all Humanities & Social Science students). Emphasizing critical thinking skills and historical interpretation of non-U.S. societies, the course will also strengthen our GEP offerings.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Global Knowledge
Humanities
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Identify and examine different Caribbean societies and cultures and the impact of historical forces and events that informed similarities and differences across the region.
 
 
Example question for a written, in-class analysis of assigned readings: In what ways did the region of the Caribbean become a stage of the European struggle for power?

 
 
Evaluate, critique, and interpret primary and secondary historical sources that highlight the process through which historians interpret evidence of different Caribbean nations in order to make claims about the past.
 
 
Example question for the Primary Source analysis assignment: Drawing on the documents provided, how did contemporary and later commentators assess the impact of the Haitian Revolution?
 
 
Identify historical evidence to construct and support analytical arguments assessing the relationship between development of the Caribbean and formation of Western modernity.
 
 
Example question for Reading reflection assignment: Provide an historical argument for the relationship between the development of Atlantic world slavery and the British Industrial Revolution.
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 
Identify features of the society, culture, economy, and politics of a diverse set of Caribbean nations and territories and examine the diverse groups of people – informed by race, class, gender, and nationality – within those nations and territories
 
 
Example prompt for Final Exam: Describe the similarities and differences among Anglophone, Hispanophone, Francophone, and Dutch islands of the region.
 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 
Compare and contrast different Caribbean societies through time and space using the conditions of slavery and freedom.
 
 
Example prompt for Midterm Exam: Compare and contrast the transition from slavery to freedom among the different imperial Caribbean colonies.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
N/A
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
N/A
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
N/A
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
N/A
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
1. Laurent Dubois and John D. Garrigus (eds.), Slave Revolution in the Caribbean: A Brief History with Documents (2017, Second Edition; $20.99)
2. Cyrus Frances Perkins (author), Paul Lovejoy, and Verene Sheperd (eds.), Busha’s Mistress or Catherine the Fugitive: A Stirring Romance of the Days of Slavery in Jamaica (2003; $24.95)
3. Irma Watkins-Owens, Blood Relations: Caribbean Immigrants of the Harlem Community (1996; $24)
4. Aimé Césaire (author), Joan Pinkman (translator), Discourse on Colonialism (2000; $16)
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
Pre-Columbian indigeneity; colonization & imperialism; plantation slavery; abolition & emancipation; the Haitian and Cuban Revolutions; gender & migration, decolonization & independence.
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

The course will be in the standard course load of offerings by a newly hired professor, with no additional resources required.

  1. Evaluate historical events from multiple perspectives

  2. Create well-reasoned arguments through analysis and assessment of historical arguments about the development of diverse identities among peoples of the Caribbean

  3. Demonstrate critical thinking skills through interpretation of primary sources that highlight the diverse historical events and forces that informed the development of the Caribbean archipelago 


Student Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course students should be able to:



  • Define key themes and issues that contributed to the development of Caribbean societies

  • Analyze the contribution that the Caribbean region has made to global history and the history of the United States

  • Identify a range of historiographical and interdisciplinary approaches to the study of the Caribbean

  • Demonstrate oral and written communication appropriate to the discipline of history 


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Written Assignment15%Reading Reflections (see attached sample syllabus)
Written Assignment15%In-class Analysis of the Week's Readings (see attached sample syllabus)
Written Assignment10%Primary Source Response (see attached sample syllabus)
Midterm20%See attached sample syllabus
Final Exam30%See attached sample syllabus
Attendance10%See attached sample syllabus
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
See attached syllabus

aeherget (Thu, 11 Jan 2018 14:16:22 GMT): AECHH: Uploading updated syllabus at faculty request via email (1/10/2018) based on friendly suggestions from UCCC 1/10/2018.
Key: 20925