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Viewing: PHI 319 : Africana Political Philosophy

Last approved: Wed, 21 Mar 2018 08:00:27 GMT

Last edit: Tue, 20 Mar 2018 11:57:35 GMT

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PHI (Philosophy)
319
017220
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Africana Political Philosophy
Africana Political Philosophy
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Philosophy and Religion (16PHI)
Term Offering
Fall Only
Offered Every Year
Fall 2018
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Stephen C. Ferguson II
Associate Professor of Philosophy and Africana Studies

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture135NoNA
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote


Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16PHILBAB. A. In PhilosophyElective
16IDSAFSCInterdisciplinary Studies - BA Sub-Plan Africana Studies Com Stud ConcElective
16IDSAFSInterdisciplinary Studies - BA Sub-Plan Africana Studies ConcentrationElective
16PHILETHPhilosophy-BA Sub-Plan Philosphy Ethics ConcentrationElective
16PHILLAWPhilosophy-BA Sub-Plan Philosophy of Law concentrationElective
16PHILBSPhilosophy-BSElective
16PHILLOGPhilosophy-BS Sub-Plan Logic, Representation and ReasonElective
16ASMMinor in Africana StudiesElective
16PHMMinor in PhilosophyElective
Africana thought on central issues in political philosophy such as justice, equality and state authority in the work of select African-American Philosophers. Material from African and Caribbean traditions may also be considered.

This course fills a noteworthy gap in the curriculum as its central topic - Africana political philosophy - has been addressed at most as a limited component in a small number of courses in other departments or divisions. The subject matter warrants extended, sustained attention and the course can make a useful contribution to the GEP-US Diversity category. Professor Ferguson was hired with the partial aim of providing a regular course offering on this important topic.


Consults were sought from IDS/Africana Studies and Political Science. As summarized in an attachment, all responses were enthusiastic.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Humanities
US Diversity
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
By the end of the course, students will be able to differentiate and connect important philosophical accounts of such goods as liberty, equality, justice, and democracy as argued by Africana philosophers to be fundamental to the human experience.
Relation of Course Specific Learning Outcome to GEP: The Africana philosophers we study in this course offer deep, interesting, and controversial accounts of metaphysical and normative debates as they relate to freedom, racism, imperialism and capitalism. By interpreting these related aspects of culture, students will thereby engage the human experience.
 
 
Essay questions on the homeworks, the paper and the final exam. (Ex.: “Critically examine Nkrumah’s argument against subjective idealism; and explain the connection of the argument to his critique of colonialism in Africa.”; “Critically evaluate Angela Davis’ conception of freedom and detail the ways in which it informed her activism as a faculty member at UCLA.”)
 
 
By the end of the course, students will be able to reconstruct the arguments offered by the philosophers we study in this course.
By analyzing and assessing the arguments of the philosophers we study in this course, students will become aware of how interpretation in Africana philosophy is a critical form of knowing.
 
 
Essay questions on the homeworks, the papers and the final exam. (Ex: “What is the relevance of the Marxist analysis of racism to the evaluation of Hill’s and Davis’views, according to McClendon?”)
 
 
By the end of the course, students will be able to evaluate arguments about the nature and meaning of freedom, racism, democracy, imperialism and capitalism.
By producing their own philosophical arguments about meaning of freedom, racism, democracy, imperialism and capitalism, students will thereby make academic arguments about the human experience using reasons.
 
 
Essay questions on the homeworks, the papers and the final exam (Ex.: “Is capitalism a fair method of economic organization even if it results in the unequal distribution of wealth?”)
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 
By the end of the course, students will be able to reconstruct the arguments offered by the philosophers we study in this course, all of whom provide analyses purporting to show how ethnic, racial and class identities are shaped by cultural and societal influences.
 
 
Essay questions on the homeworks, article summaries and the final exam. (Ex.: What is the relationship between idealism and political philosophy for Nkrumah? Is the argument in which he purports to establish the relationship logically valid?)
 
 

 
 

 
 
By the end of the course, the student will be able to compare the differing philosophical positions of philosophers on capitalism, the role of the State and the nature of freedom as they bear on the interpretation and evaluation of social actions by race, class and ethnic background.
 
 
Essay questions on the homeworks, a paper, article summaries and the final exam. (Ex.: What is the relationship between racism and capitalism for Callinicos?; What has been the role of the bourgeois State in the reproduction of racism according to McClendon?)
 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100%
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
NA
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
NA
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
None
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
NA
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
Required texts:
Kwame Nkrumah, Consciencism: Philosophy and Ideology for De-Colonization and Development with Particular Reference to the African Revolution (Monthly Review Press, 1964) ISBN 978-0853451365
Alex Callinicos, Race and Class (Bookmarks, 1993) ISBN 978-0906224830
Other readings as listed in syllabus schedule and available at the course Moodle site.
Recommended text:
Alex Tuckness and Clark Wolf, This Is Political Philosophy: An Introduction (Wiley-Blackwell, 2016) ISBN 978-1118765975 (The text’s best use will be explained at appropriate points in the course.)
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
See syllabus and below.
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
none
College(s)Contact NameStatement Summary
College of Humanities and Social SciencesSteven Greene, Political ScienceLooks good to me and meets with approval from our Political Philosophy faculty member.
College of Humanities and Social SciencesBlair L M Kelley, IDSI'd like to second Kwesi's support and look forward to this course being available to students soon.
College of Humanities and Social SciencesKwesi Craig Brookins, IDS/Africana StudiesI enthusiastically support the approval of PHI 319.
Professor Ferguson was hired with the partial aim of providing a regular course offering on this important topic.

Objective 1: Compare the differing philosophical positions of Africana philosophers on capitalism, the role of the State and the nature of freedom.


Objective 2: Carefully read and interpret texts by Africana philosophers on central issues in political philosophy.


Objective 3: Characterize and clarify major philosophical concepts such as materialism, idealism, empiricism, rationalism, and philosophical anthropology.


Student Learning Outcomes

Outcome 1: Students will be able to analyze the relationship between philosophical anthropology, political ethics and social life as it relates to the Africana experience.


Outcome 2: Students will be able to identify the main arguments put forward by various Africana political philosophers studied.


Outcome 3: Students will be able to identify key concepts in Africana political philosophy and will be able to evaluate theoretical arguments based on those concepts.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Participation5See syllabus
Written Assignment20"Homeworks" - Answers to questions to be posted at Moodle in advance of each class.
Essay20Article summaries (4@ 425 words)
Short Paper20~1700 words
Final Exam35Take home exam, essay
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Introduction and The Concept of Political Philosophy and the Matter of the Africana Experience1.5 wkssee syllabus
The Concept of Political Philosophy and the Matter of the Africana Experience1 wksee syllabus
What is Freedom?1 wksee syllabus
Problem of Political Obligation1 wksee syllabus
Political Ethics of Revolution1 wksee syllabus
Engaging Consciencism: Political Philosophy in the Africana World6 wkssee syllabus
Dialectic of Racism and Capitalism1.5 wkssee syllabus
Philosophy and the Material Problem of Racism and Sexism2 wkssee syllabus
Final Exam1 wksee syllabus

Key: 21139