Viewing: ENG 208 / : Studies In Fiction

Last approved: Wed, 16 Jan 2019 09:00:35 GMT

Last edit: Mon, 07 Jan 2019 14:54:53 GMT

Changes proposed by: jswarts
Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
Minor
ENG (English)
208
008417
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Studies In Fiction
Studies in Fiction
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
English (16ENG)
23.0101
English Language and Literature, General.
Term Offering
Fall, Spring and Summer
Offered Every Year
Spring 2019
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Thomas Phillips
Lecturer

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture12030Yesno comment
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
None.

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16ENGLBAEnglish BAElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLCRWEnglish BA-Creative Writing Elective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLFLMEnglish BA-FilmElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLLWREnglish BA-Language, Writing, and RhetoricElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLMEnglish BA-MinorElective
Representative examples of novels and short stories from different periods, emphasizing understanding and appreciation of fiction as a genre, a knowledge of the features and techniques of fiction, and a sense of the development of the genre.

This is a part of the GEP HUM Review.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Humanities
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Analyze a variety of literary texts using techniques of critical analysis that foreground cultural and personal modes of interpretation.
 
 
Essays and tests.

Example test prompt:
In Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House, Dr. Montague suggests to Eleanor: “everything is worse … when you think something is looking at you.” How might this statement be indicative of a broader theme of the novel such as cultural alienation or belonging that we have discussed in class?
 
 
Identify prominent themes and literary forms that contribute to the meaning of a literary text.
 
 
Essays and tests.

Example test prompt:
How might the form or style of Virginia Woolf’s “A Haunted House” be indicative of its content and what is the nature of that content? How does it illuminate meaning?
 
 
Analyze a single novel or short story by comparing and/or contrasting with two different literary texts, interpreting the surface features and thematic complexities of those texts.
 
 
Essays.

The first essay requires students to analyze a single literary text by constructing an interpretive claim based on evidence from the text in the form of quoted passages.

Example: The student will engage in critical analysis by endeavoring to make a cohesive, interpretive argument based on critical points in the text. In other words, your aim should be to locate meaning in the narrative. Remember that meaning can derive equally from plot, theme, or literary style. Consider, too, the many different ways we have approached texts in class. The following terms should help direct you:

-action -time -ego/self -home -consciousness -desire

Remember that these are merely themes to serve as guideposts rather than arguments.

The second essay is identical to the first but includes a research component. Students have the option of focusing secondary sources that deal directly or indirectly with the primary text.
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
N/A
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
N/A
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
None
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
N/A
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
DeLillo, Don. The Body Artist. Scribner, 2002. $9.00
Fabre, Dominique. The Waitress Was New. Archipelago, 2008. $15.00
Jackson, Shriley. The Haunting of Hill House. Penguin, 1987. $10.50
Salinger, J.D. Franny and Zooey. Back Bay, 2001. $13.99
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
See syllabus for full schedule.

Charles Baudelaire, “To the Reader” (online)
Ralph Waldo Emerson, “The American Scholar” (online); “The Parable of the Prodigal Son” (online)
Mark Twain, “Eve’s Diary” (online)
Nathaniel Hawthorne, “Young Goodman Brown” (online)
Edgar Allen Poe, “The Cask of Amantilado” (online);
Erving Goffman, “The Presentation of Self” (library e-reserve)
Shirley Jackson, The Haunting of Hill House
Virginia Woolf, “A Haunted House” (online)
J.D. Salinger, "Franny and Zooey"
Raymond Carver, “Cathedral” (online)
James Baldwin, “Sonny’s Blues” (online)
Flannery O’Connor, “A Good Man is Hard to Find” (online)
Dominique Fabre, The Waitress Was New
Don DeLillo, The Body Artist
Ernest Hemingway, “The Big Two-Hearted River” (online)
Diane Wakoski, “The Belly Dancer” (online)
Franz Kafka, “A Hunger Artist” (online)
Herman Melville, “Bartleby the Scrivener” (online)
Ursula K. Le Guin, “The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas” (online)
Charles Bukowski, “Rain” (online)
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
N/A
The course is part of the instructor’s normal teaching load

Student Learning Outcomes


aeherget (Wed, 10 Oct 2018 12:13:00 GMT): Rollback: AECHH: Rollback because SLOs don't match last approved. Adjustments to the student learning outcomes are major changes.
despain (Mon, 22 Oct 2018 20:51:50 GMT): Rollback: Update action for CUE review.
aeherget (Mon, 07 Jan 2019 14:54:53 GMT): AECHH: At the January 4, 2019 CUE Meeting the members approved ENG 208 with the following friendly suggestions: -Refine the syllabus removing some of the terms around extra credit such as "grade grubbing". -Members suggested changing the word "meaning" in the second outcome ("Identify prominent themes and literary forms that contribute to the meaning of a literary text.") to "interpretation".
Key: 2238
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