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Viewing: ENG 252 : Major American Writers

Last approved: Tue, 08 May 2018 11:49:53 GMT

Last edit: Tue, 08 May 2018 11:49:50 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
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Major
ENG (English)
252
008460
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Major American Writers
Major American Writers
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
English (16ENG)
Term Offering
Fall, Spring and Summer
Offered Every Year
Fall 2018
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Michael Grimwood
Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture7035YesN/A
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
R: Credit will not be given for both ENG 252 and either ENG 265 or ENG 266.

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16ENGBA-16LLTEnglish BA-LiteratureElective
16ENGLBAEnglish BAElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLCRWEnglish BA-Creative WritingElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLFLMEnglish BA-FilmElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLLWREnglish BA-Language, Writing, and RhetoricElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLTEDEnglish BA-Teacher EducationElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLMEnglish BA-MinorElective
Significant American authors chosen from among such figures as Franklin, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, Douglass, Stowe, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, James, Frost, Faulkner, Hemingway, and Morrison. Credit will not be given for both ENG 252 and either ENG 265 or 266.

This is a part of the GEP HUM Review. 


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Humanities
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Examine some persistent American debates about the incorporation of individuals within, or their exclusion from, various communities, including various formulations of the idea of the nation.
 
 
Essay
Sample prompt: Reread Henry David Thoreau's "Civil Disobedience." Then choose at least six of the following authors to constitute his jury: Irving, Cooper, Hawthorne, Longstreet, Kennedy, Emerson, Poe, Douglass, Melville, Whitman, Prescott, Dickinson. Try to imagine how each of the six (or more) "jurors" would react to Thoreau's actions and to his essay, and explain how each would vote in Thoreau's case.
 
 
Recognize an array of relationships between significant U.S. literary works and American political, religious, economic, and cultural history.
 
 
Essay
Sample prompt: Choose one of the assigned literary works originally published between 1850 and 1950. Locate at least nine other items, not on the course Moodle site, that were originally published within five years before and/or within five years after the work you have chosen, and that discuss a specific issue, fact, or idea that appears in the work you have chosen. Define a relationship between a character, an occurrence, a plot point, an element of setting, or a passing reference in the literary work you have chosen and the treatments of the issue, fact, or idea among the nine or more contextual items.
 
 
Practice conventional methods for analyzing the structures and techniques of short fiction.
 
 
Essay
Sample prompt: Reread Henry David Thoreau's "Civil Disobedience." Then choose at least six of the following authors to constitute his jury: Irving, Cooper, Hawthorne, Longstreet, Kennedy, Emerson, Poe, Douglass, Melville, Whitman, Prescott, Dickinson. Try to imagine how each of the six (or more) "jurors" would react to Thoreau's actions and to his essay, and explain how each would vote in Thoreau's case.
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
N/A
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
N/A
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
None
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
N/A
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
Perkins, George, and Barbara Perkins, eds. The American Tradition in Literature. Concise 12th ed. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2009. ($75.99)
Other miscellaneous stories, articles, and other items available through Moodle.

OPTIONAL:
MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers. 8th ed. New York: Modern Language Association, 2016. ($6.99)
Tindall, George B., and David Shi. America: A Narrative History. 2 vols. 10th ed. New York: Norton, 2016. ($25.11)
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
N. Scott Momaday, The Way to Rainy Mountain, excerpts. Alice Walker, “Everyday Use” (1973) Perkins 2183-90. Maxine Hong Kingston, “No Name Woman” (1976) Survey of Colonial American literature. John Smith, Mary Rowlandson, 1700s William Byrd II, Jonathan Edwards, Benjamin Franklin,
St. Jean de Crèvecoeur, Olaudah Equiano, Phillis Wheatley, and Thomas Jefferson. Washington Irving, “Rip Van Winkle” (1819 Perkins 307-20. James Fenimore Cooper, The Pioneers, Chapter 22 (1823) Perknis and Cooper, The Prairie, Chapter 39. Nathaniel Hawthorne, “My Kinsman, Major Molineux” Augustus Baldwin Longstreet, “The Horse Swap.” John Pendleton Kennedy, “Abe” (1832) Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nature. “The American Scholar” Edgar Allan Poe, “A Tale of the Ragged Mountains” Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick. Henry David Thoreau, “Civil Disobedience” Herman Melville, “Benito Cereno” Walt Whitman, “Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking” Bayard Taylor, “The Palm and the Pine” (1859) John Greenleaf Whittier, “The Double-Headed Snake of Newbury” (1959). Harriet Prescott [Spofford], “Circumstance” (1860) Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, “Paul Revere’s Ride” (1861). Julia Ward Howe, “The Battle Hymn of the Republic” Emily Dickinson, “Because I could not stop for Death—"Emily Dickinson, “Split the Lark” (1864/1865) Walt Whitman, “When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom’d” (1865) Mark Twain, “A True Story, Repeated Word for Word. Henry James, “Daisy Miller” (1878), parts iii and iv. Mary E. Wilkins [Freeman], “The Revolt of ‘Mother’” (1890) Stephen Crane, “The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky” (1898) Jack London, “To Build a Fire” (1908). Ezra Pound, “In a Station of the Metro” (1912) Perkins 1484-87. T. S. Eliot, “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” (1915) Perkins 1503-10
Robert Frost, “The Road Not Taken” (1916) Perkins 1441-43, 1451 Susan Glaspell, “Trifles” (1916) Zora Neale Hurston, “Drenched in Light” (1924) Langston Hughes, The Weary Blues (1926)—excerpts Perkins 1658-60. Zora Neale Hurston, “How It Feels to Be Colored Me” Ernest Hemingway, “Big Two-Hearted River” (1925). William Faulkner, “Barn Burning” (1939). Richard Wright, “Almos’ a Man” Flannery O’Connor, “Revelation” Ursula LeGuin, “The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas” (1973) Cormac McCarthy, “The Scalphunters” (1980) Toni Morrison, “Recitatif”



 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
N/A
No new resources needed. HUM review.

  1. To become familiar with representative narratives by a wide variety of major American authors, from the foundations of a self-conscious U.S. literary tradition to the recent past

  2. To learn conventional methods for analyzing the structures and techniques of short fiction

  3. To recognize an array of relationships between significant U.S. literary works and American political, religious, economic, and cultural history

  4. To recognize affinities and intersections between literature and the visual and performing arts

  5. To examine some salient American habits of creating, maintaining, and disrupting traditions for defining national character and national memory

  6. To examine some persistent American debates about the incorporation of individuals within, or their exclusion from, various communities, including various formulations of the idea of the nation.

  7. To improve writing and research skills. 


Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Identify key narratives used by a variety of American writers

  2. Evaluate the application of literary techniques used in American fiction

  3. Develop critical thinking strategies for linking the reading of literature within a cultural framework

  4. Demonstrate a proficiency for comparing visual arts with the written word

  5. Recognize the tradition of rebelliousness that represents national identities   

  6. Recognize the tension between the individual and the collective

  7. Develop and refine key competences as a reader and writer


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Quizzes15%Multiple quizzes throughout semester
Major Paper15%First Paper
Midterm15%One Midterm Exam
Major Paper25%Second Paper
Final Exam25%One Final Exam
Other5%Inventory of Responses to Writing

aeherget (Tue, 03 Apr 2018 13:04:00 GMT): AECHH: Pending and suggested items provided 4/2/2018 based on comments from March 28, 2018 UCCC meeting.
aeherget (Fri, 06 Apr 2018 20:20:37 GMT): AECHH: Updated contact hours based on the friendly suggestion from CUE 4/6/2018.
aeherget (Fri, 06 Apr 2018 20:24:49 GMT): AECHH: Remove, previous action and comment. 4/6/2018
aeherget (Mon, 09 Apr 2018 16:35:38 GMT): AECHH: Approving typo based on a friendly suggestion from April 6, 2018 CUE meeting. 4/9/2018
Key: 2261