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Viewing: ENG 362 : Studies in the British Novel

Last approved: Fri, 16 Dec 2016 09:01:57 GMT

Last edit: Thu, 15 Dec 2016 21:11:46 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
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Major
ENG (English)
362
008579
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Studies in the British Novel
Brit Novel
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
English (16ENG)
Term Offering
Fall and Spring
Offered Alternate Years
Fall 2017
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Leila May
Associate Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture3535Nonone
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Requisite: Sophomore Standing or Above
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16ENGBA-16LLTEnglish BA-LiteratureElective
16ENGLBAEnglish BAElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLCRWEnglish BA-Creative WritingElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLFLMEnglish BA-FilmElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLLWREnglish BA-Language, Writing, and RhetoricElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLTEDEnglish BA-Teacher EducationElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLMEnglish BA-FilmElective
Emphasizes major novelists such as Behn, Fielding, Defoe, Richardson, Swift, Austen, Dickens, the Brontës, Eliot, Carroll, Hardy, Stevenson, Wilde, Stoker, James, Woolf, Forster, Joyce, Orwell, Lawrence, Lessing, Murdoch, Burgess, McEwan, Ishiguro, Byatt, Mantel, Zadie Smith.

Part of new literature curriculum.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Humanities
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Interpret a variety of works within their socio-historical contexts. The historical sense developed will be demonstrated by the student's ability to relate--in written form or in discussion--the ways in which the literary work being studied exposes the values, problems, anxieties and pleasures of the historical period that generates that particular literary work.
 
 
Essays, examinations, quizzes, presentations, and class discussions.

Sample questions:
1) What are two of the momentous changes in the intellectual and scientific climate that developed over the course of the nineteenth century? Provide examples from at least two literary texts.
2) What does it mean to say that Stoker is a "fin-de-siècle" writer? (Don't just define the term.)
3) Explain shy the governess figure was such a source of anxiety for the Victorian imagination.
 
 
Apply to specific examples of literature the techniques of critical interpretation, showing how these interpretations constitute an understanding of the social world from which these works spring.
 
 
Students will write papers in which they apply the techniques of close reading and critical interpretation, bringing to bear on their literary analyses the skills they have learned in class and the historical knowledge they have gained from class discussions and secondary readings and reports.

Sample topic:

Discuss the ways in which the phenomenon of social mobility is rendered in Great Expectations. What might you construe about Dickens's stance toward the newly industrialized capitalist society in general, and its middle classes in particular? Where do women fit (or not) into this picture?
 
 
Produce an academic argument about literature using reasons and ways of supporting those reasons that are appropriate to the field of study. Students should be able to articulate their ideas--in written form or in discussion--and demonstrate through coherent presentations the relation between clear thought and clear expression.
 
 
Students will write papers in which they apply the techniques of close reading and critical interpretation, bringing to bear on their literary analyses the skills they have learned in class and the historical knowledge they have gained from class discussions and secondary readings and reports.

Sample topics:

1) The French existentialist philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre says, "It is as an object that I appear to the Other," and "I see myself because somebody sees me." Many critics have since taken Sartre’s ideas and applied them to literature, film, painting, everyday life. Consider the function of the "gaze" (or look) as a central thematic concern in Jane Eyre. What is its importance in the text? Who looks at whom, how, why, when, and with what consequences? How do power and objectification work in relation to the dynamic of the look? (You may want to consider how the gaze operates not just between Jane and Rochester but between Jane and St. John as well.)

2) In April 1895, a Punch journalist wrote: "A new fear my bosom vexes;/ Tomorrow there may be no sexes!" In a similar vein (no pun intended), Bram Stoker contends:

the ideal man is entirely or almost entirely masculine and the ideal woman is entirely or almost entirely feminine. . . . [T]he attraction of the individual to the other sex depends upon its place on the scale between the highest and lowest grade of sex. The most masculine draws the most feminine woman, and visa versa; and so down the scale till close to the borderline in the great mass of persons, who, having developed a few of the qualities of a sex, are easily satisfied to mate with anyone.

In many fin-de-siècle (end-of-century) works, this "borderline" figure is markedly evident. We no longer simply have a battle between the sexes but, as critic Elaine Showalter puts it, we also have "a battle within the sexes." Analyze this battle in one or more of the texts we have read in the last half of the semester.
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
70%
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
The remaining 30% of seats are restricted to English majors (on a first come, first serve basis).
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
No.
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
Pre-requisite: Junior standing or above.
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
None.
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 

 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

No additional resources.

In this course students will explore the British novel from a variety of interrelated vantage points.  Over the course of the semester, they will:


1. become familiar with the ways in which the British novel both reflected and contributed to unprecedented changes in the social, cultural, and intellectual milieu of the age;


2. examine the ways that gender, sexuality, race, work, class relations, and the family function in these works, and how the novel participated in creating and reinscribing many of the ideologies of the day;


3. recognize the disparate novelistic genres and literary modes that were dominant in the nineteenth century;


4. learn how to make critical and analytical arguments about these literary texts.


Student Learning Outcomes

By the end of the semester, students should be able to:


1. construct arguments about the ways that these novels relate to their historical contexts;


2. analyze how contemporary anxieties about the changes in gender, sexuality, race, work, class relations, and the family were inscribed in the novels of the period;


3. explain how different genres play a role in these works;


4. critically evaluate and interpret literary texts and secondary sources.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Midterm15%Select seven out of the eleven passages below and identify the author and the work from which each was extracted. Identify the speaker and, where appropriate, the person to whom the speech is being directed. In a substantial paragraph, explain the context of the passage and its significance in relation to some of the text's larger meanings or concerns.
Final Exam20%Part A: Provide a brief response to 10 of the following 14 questions. (E.g., Define “coverture” and explain briefly how it plays a role in one of the texts we’ve read this semester.) Part B: . Select any seven of the eleven passages below and identify the author and the work from which each was extracted. Identify the speaker and, where appropriate, the person to whom the speech is being directed. In a substantial paragraph, explain the context of the passage and its significance in relation to some of the text's larger meanings or concerns.
Essay40%Sample topic: Discuss the issue of identity in The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Is there such a thing, according to the book’s representation of identity, as a unitary self? What, for example, does Stevenson mean when he has Jekyll refer to "the profound duplicity of life"? Does Stevenson mean for Hyde to be a monstrous anomaly, or is he supposed to represent the monster in all of us? In either case, discuss the causality of this monstrosity, and what you take to be the success or failure of Stevenson’s account.
Oral Presentation5%Each student will be required to prepare an oral presentation on a secondary reading providing sociohistorical or literary critical context for the works we will be discussing. These will be be group efforts, and will involve summarizing the key issues of the essay in question. Reports must be accompanied by a brief handout, and should take approximately 10-15 minutes total.
Forum_post10% Every week you will write one entry that consists of two parts: 1) ruminations on that week's reading, class discussion, or a response to a specific question which I have raised for you to investigate; 2) a response to at least one other student's entry. Ideally, the journals should give you the opportunity to explore more fully and informally your ideas about the reading (or class discussions) that you find particularly interesting or puzzling, and to engage in a sustained dialogue with other members of the class.
Participation10%As this course focuses primarily on discussion, your punctual attendance and contribution to class discussions are essential and will be counted as part of your final grade.
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
See attached syllabus

aeherget (Thu, 10 Nov 2016 18:57:06 GMT): AECHH: Uploading syllabus at instructor's request via email. 11/10/2016
aeherget (Mon, 21 Nov 2016 20:56:42 GMT): AECHH: Uploading syllabus at instructor's request via email. 11/21/2016
aeherget (Wed, 23 Nov 2016 20:10:31 GMT): AECHH: Uploading syllabus at instructor's request via email. 11/22/2016
Key: 2284