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Viewing: ENG 372 : American Poetry, Twentieth Century and Beyond

Last approved: Mon, 10 Oct 2016 14:21:31 GMT

Last edit: Mon, 10 Oct 2016 14:21:31 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
Major
ENG (English)
372
008588
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
American Poetry, Twentieth Century and Beyond
AmPoetry20CBeyond
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
English (16ENG)
Term Offering
Fall and Spring
Offered Alternate Years
Fall 2017
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Jon Thompson
Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture3535NoN/A
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16ENGBA-16LLTEnglish BA-Literature Elective
16ENGLBAEnglish BAElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLCRWEnglish BA- Creative WritingElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLFLMEnglish BA-FilmElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLLWREnglish BA- Language, Writing , and RhetoricElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLTEDEnglish BA- Teacher EducationElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLMEnglish BA- MinorElective
Study of poetry written in the twentieth-century and after by American poets. This course will examine major developments in form and technique by poets influenced by transformative movements such as Imagism, Modernism, the Objectivists, Black Mountain poetics, New York School and subsequent developments. The course will situate poetry in key contexts, whether literary or cultural. Representative poets: T.S. Eliot, H.D., Langston Hughes, Frank O¿Hara, C.D. Wright and Yusef Komunyakaa.

Part of the revisions for the new Literature Program concentration.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Humanities
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Interpret a variety of poems from critical perspectives that illuminate the transformations American poetry has undergone from the twentieth-century until the present day.
 
 
Critical Essays.
Sample essay question: T.S. Eliot’s “The Waste Land” is full of images that are strange, fantastic, unsettling, unpleasant—in short, grotesque. Discuss the poem’s vision of the grotesque. What different kinds of grotesque imagery does Eliot employ? How do you classify or label them? How does he use these different categories of the grotesque? What vision of experience does this use of the grotesque dramatize? What is the connection between the religious references in the poem and the poem’s grotesque elements? What is the connection between the Tarot cards and the poem’s grotesque elements? Formulate a coherent thesis and use it to mount a critical argument.
 
 
Analyze, evaluate and/or synthesize different interpretations of literary texts. Students will then use these literary texts to demonstrate the different interpretations that can be made of the formal elements of poetry and/or the historical moments the poetry is responding to.
 
 
Critical essays.
Sample essay question: Symbolism has been described as a movement which finds “truth to inhere in mental operations rather than in the outside world.” The “practitioners of symbolism in varying ways and degrees proclaimed the supremacy of idea over fact.” With this in mind, discuss H.D.'s symbolism in THE WALLS WILL NOT FALL. What symbols are emphasized in this collection? What significances does H.D.'s symbology have? How does her symbology inform her world view? Discuss. Develop your argument by using at least two critical interpretations of the symbology in THE WALLS WILL NOT FALL. (The critical sources can be used either as support for your argument or as refutation).
 
 
Conduct critical research using reasons and evidence regarding American poetry in ways appropriate to critical essay writing in the humanities.
 
 
Critical essays.
Sample essay question: What vision or “image of society” does C.D. Wright present in ONE BIG SELF? While obviously not offering a fully-fleshed out, narrated vision of society, nevertheless it is possible to say that the collection offers a vision of some of the essential elements of human community. What are these and in what images are they embedded? What kind of society is Wright memorializing—or elegizing? What are its values, its modus operandi, its achievements? What, importantly, are its chief failures? For Wright, what duties does poetry have in relation to society? What obligations? Discuss.
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
70%
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
30% of seats will be restricted to English majors.
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
NA
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
Sophomore standing.
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
None
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
See attached syllabus
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
See attached syllabus
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
NA
No new resources required.

1. Interpret a variety of poetic traditions and forms from critical perspectives that illuminate the transformations American poetry has undergone in the twentieth century/contemporary period.


2. Analyze the relationship between form, content, and meaning in poetry.


3. Conduct critical research that casts light on the literary/cultural dimensions of American poetry.


4. Create well-constructed arguments.


5. Demonstrate their proficiency as critical writers in terms of critical development and stylistic clarity.


Student Learning Outcomes

Students will be able to:


1. Identify major transformative trends in American poetry in the twentieth century and after.


2. Identify key historical and cultural moments that this poetry is responding to in this period.


3. Identify formal innovations in American poetry in this period.


4. Critically evaluate primary sources (literary texts) and secondary sources (essays and book chapters).


5. Develop critical thinking skills and critical writing skills.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Essay40%Thesis-driven critical essays with emphasis placed upon development of the argument with appropriate support. (Two critical essays, each counting 20%).
Exam40%Exams will consist of a midterm examination in class and a final exam in class. Both will emphasize critical thinking and critical writing.
Participation10% Participation of various kinds is regarded as key. The various forms of participation and the ways in which participation is evaluated are spelled out in the syllabus.
Quizzes10%Students will participate in in-class quizzes and in class writing assignments. More information for both are spelled out in the syllabus.
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
See syllabus

Key: 2289