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Viewing: ENG 370 : American Fiction, Twentieth Century and Beyond

Last approved: Thu, 22 Dec 2016 09:02:13 GMT

Last edit: Thu, 22 Dec 2016 09:02:13 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
Major
ENG (English)
370
008585
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
American Fiction, Twentieth Century and Beyond
American Fiction 20C & Beyond
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
English (16ENG)
Term Offering
Fall and Spring
Offered Alternate Years
Fall 2017
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Jon Thompson
Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture3535NoN/A
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16ENGBA-16LLT English BA- Literature Elective
16ENGLBAEnglish BAElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLCRWEnglish BA- Creative WritingElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLFLMEnglish BA- FilmElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLLWREnglish BA - Language, Writing , and Rhetoric Elective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLTEDEnglish BA-Teacher EducationElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLMEnglish BA- MinorElective
Study of narrative fiction written in the twentieth-century and after by American writers. This course will examine major developments in narrative form and technique, based on developments in important literary traditions such as realism, modernism or postmodernism. The course will situate the fiction in key contexts, whether literary or cultural. Representative writers: Ernest Hemingway, Gertrude Stein, William Faulkner, Toni Morrison and Cormac McCarthy.

Part of the revisions for the new Literature Program concentration.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Humanities
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Interpret a variety of novels and short stories from critical perspectives that illuminate the transformations American fiction has undergone from the twentieth-century until the present day.
 
 
Critical essays.
Sample prompt: AS I LAY DYING describes the dirt-poor Bundren family’s attempt bury their mother in a trip that takes them across the rural South. The novel is famous for its emphasis on the grotesque. Discuss Faulkner’s use of the grotesque in this novel with some reference to modernism. What kinds of grotesquerie does he focus on? (Identify them). In what ways is the grotesque associated with the South? How does Faulkner use the grotesque to comment on the South? Which aspects of the South are seen as grotesque? What central images? Lastly, what function does the grotesque serve in the novel? Elaborate.
 
 
Analyze, evaluate and/or synthesize different interpretations of literary texts. Students will then use these literary texts to demonstrate the different interpretations that can be made of the formal elements in the fiction with reference to different critical or cultural contexts.
 
 
Critical essays.

Sample essay question: Some critics interpret THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF ALICE B. TOKLAS to not merely be about key modernist figures such as Picasso and Hemingway, but an example of high modernist art itself in its unorthodox use of style and form. With reference to modernism and the literary criticism of THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF ALICE B. TOKLAS, discuss the novel's allegiance to modernism and specific modernist traits. In what ways is this hybrid novel an example of high modernist art? What are some of the important consequences for literature and readers in terms of understanding the novel in terms of its modernist allegiances?
 
 
Conduct critical research on the human experience using reasons and evidence regarding American fiction appropriate to critical essay writing in the humanities.
 
 
Critical essays.
Sample essay question: The post World War II world witnessed the destructive power of atom bombs in Japan and the rise of nuclear weapons in large parts of the globe. Post World War II American culture has been fascinated by apocalyptic scenarios of all kinds and this cultural strain has manifested itself in novels, films, short stories and television shows. Discuss Cormac McCarthy’s vision of the apocalypse in THE ROAD. How does McCarthy envision the apocalypse? What parts of the world are devastated? What causes the devastation, and why do you think the novel is reticent about identifying the exact source? What are the effects of the apocalypse upon civilization? What social values and aspirations has the apocalypse destroyed or threatened? To what extent does McCarthy suggest that civilization can be reconstituted? What is the central or defining imagery and what is its significance?
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
70%
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
30% of seats will be restricted to English Majors
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
NA
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
Sophomore standing
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
None
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
See sample syllabus
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
NA
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
NA
No new resources required.

Students will:


1.Interpret a variety of novels and short stories from critical perspectives that illuminate the transformations American fiction has undergone in the twentieth century/contemporary period.


2. Analyze the relationship between form, content, and meaning in American fiction.


3. Conduct critical research that casts light on the literary/cultural dimensions of American fiction.


4. Create well-constructed arguments.


5.Demonstrate their proficiency as critical writers in terms of critical development and stylistic clarity.


Student Learning Outcomes

Students will be able to:


1. Identify major transformative trends in American fiction in the twentieth century and after.


2. Identify key historical and cultural moments that this fiction is responding to in this period.


3. Describe key tenets of American realism, modernism and postmodernism in this period.


4.Critically evaluate primary sources (literary texts) and secondary sources (essays and book chapters).


5. Identify formal innovations in American fiction in this period.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Essay40%Thesis-driven critical essays with emphasis placed upon development of the argument with appropriate support. (Two of them, each 20%).
Quizzes10%Daily quizzes on assigned reading with an emphasis on knowledge of the content of the texts.
Midterm20%Emphasis on critical thinking and critical writing.
Participation10%Participation of various kinds is regarded as key. The various forms of participation and the ways in which participation is evaluated are spelled out in the syllabus.
Final Exam20%Emphasis on critical thinking and writing.
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
See attached syllabus

n51ls801 (Fri, 04 Nov 2016 11:28:45 GMT): Corrected syllabus will be sent separately. (Adobe Flash blocked.)
Key: 2293