Viewing: ENG 261 / : English Literature I

Last approved: Wed, 16 Jan 2019 09:00:43 GMT

Last edit: Tue, 15 Jan 2019 14:46:17 GMT

Changes proposed by: jswarts
Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
Minor
ENG (English)
261
008466
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
English Literature I
English Literature I
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
English (16ENG)
23.0101
English Language and Literature, General.
Term Offering
Fall, Spring and Summer
Offered Every Year
Spring 2019
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)
Distance Education (DELTA)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Knowles, James
Teaching Associate Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture15030YesSections are taught by multiple faculty members on a rotating basis. Some sections are double sections (60 students), but the norm is 30.
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Delivery FormatPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
LEC6060NoN/A
Restriction: Credit is not allowed for both ENG 261 and ENG 251.

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16ENGLBAEnglish BAElective
16ENGBA-16LLTEnglish BA-LiteratureElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLCRWEnglish BA-Creative WritingElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLFLMEnglish BA-FilmElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLLWREnglish BA-Language, Writing, and RhetoricElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLTEDEnglish BA-Teacher EducationElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLMEnglish BA-MinorElective
A survey of English literature to 1660, including Old English, Middle English, and Renaissance writing, focusing on such central authors as Chaucer, Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Jonson, Donne, and Milton. Credit will not be given for both ENG 261 and ENG 251.

GEP Humanities review


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Humanities
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Students will analyze and interpret literary texts from a variety of critical perspectives, including formal/aesthetic and historical approaches.
 
 
Quizzes. Example: a quiz on Shakespeare's Sonnets asks students to perform a formal analysis of a single sonnet (labeling its component parts, marking the rhyme scheme and metrical pattern, identifying figurative language); then to compose a paragraph connecting the formal analysis to the poem's wider contexts -- both within the sequence of Shakespeare's Sonnets, and to the historical and biographical contexts of its creation.
 
 
Students will engage with previous scholarly interpretations of literary texts, compare those interpretations with their own, and debate the merits of different perspectives.
 
 
Forum posts (using Moodle forum tool) and/or exam essay questions.

Example prompt: One scholar, Laurie Finke, has suggested that Marie de France’s main interest in the *Lais* was to “explore the situations of those marginalized members of the Norman aristocracy, specifically women and bachelor knights, those younger sons dispossessed by the system of primogeniture by which the ruling class perpetuated itself.” But if this is the case, then is Marie’s exploration limited to *describing* the plight of the marginalized? Or do her tales provide any resistance to the status quo? Compose an essay in which you test Finke's theory using *Lanval* and *Chevrefoil* as case studies.
 
 
Students will demonstrate proficiency in composing well-constructed written arguments, drawing connections between literary artifacts and the historical and cultural contexts in which those artifacts were created and disseminated.
 
 
Exam essay questions. Example prompt: Compose an essay in which you discuss the ways in which religion and literature are interconnected in at least two of the following texts: Dream of the Rood, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, the Pardoner's Tale, and Paradise Lost. Good responses will provide supporting evidence from the texts themselves AND from their historical and cultural contexts.
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
n/a
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
n/a
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
Credit is not allowed for both ENG 261 and ENG 251.
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
n/a
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
Greenblatt, Stephen et al., eds. "The Norton Anthology of English Literature." 9th edition. Volumes A and B.
Volume A: $41.25
Volume B: $41.25
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
Readings will vary by instructor, but a typical section would include the following units:

Old English / Anglo-Saxon Period (ca. 500 - ca. 1100)

Anglo-Norman Period (ca. 1100 - ca. 1350). Sub-unit on chivalric romance.

Middle English Period (ca. 1150 - 1500). Sub-unit on women's devotional writing.

Early Modern Period (ca. 1500 - 1660). Sub-units on English sonnet, Elizabethan drama, the Reformation, Metaphysical poets, and Civil War / Interregnum
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
n/a
Taught by regular faculty and NTT faculty on a rotating basis as part of their ordinary course loads.

Student Learning Outcomes


Key: 2296
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