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Viewing: ENG 382 : Film and Literature

Last approved: Fri, 19 Feb 2016 21:32:07 GMT

Last edit: Fri, 19 Feb 2016 21:32:07 GMT

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ENG (English)
382
008605
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Film and Literature
Film and Literature
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
English (16ENG)
Term Offering
Fall, Spring and Summer
Offered Every Year
Fall 2015
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Ora Gelley
Associate Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture3535Yesn/a
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16ENGLBAEnglish BAElective
16ENGLFLMEnglish Film BAElective
OthersOthersElective
Ways of adapting literary works to film form. Similarities and differences between these two media. Emphasis on the practical art of transforming literature into film. Attention to the impact of film upon literature.

During the university required review to maintain this course on its VPA list, film faculty instinctively recognized the global nature of this course as well and are now also seeking to make it available as part of the university's emphasis on global knowledge.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Global Knowledge
Visual & Performing Arts
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Analyze the relationship between textual sources (such as novels, short stories, parables, journalistic accounts, etc.) and their cinematic or televisual adaptations, using appropriate film and literary studies terminology.
 
 
Essay Question

Compare and contrast the realist aesthetic of Matteo Garrone's film Gomorrah (2008) with that of Roberto Saviano’s book by the same title. Your essay should take into account the way in which the film "defines"–through its representational practices or approaches–the question of realism. What, for instance, are some of the realist conventions used by the film? What is the relationship between realism and "truth" in the film? How does the film redefine or update older notions of realism (e.g., Italian neorealism, the historical film)? How do actors (professional/non-professional) figure into the film's realist mode?
 
 
Interpret films as well as works of literature (and the relation between the two) and practice formulating and supporting arguments about them.
 
 
Exam Question

In the film version of "The Blue Angel" (Joseph von Sternberg, 1929) arguably much more so than the novel (Heinrich Mann, 1905), the female character (Lola Lola/Rosa Frölich) is a femme fatale, who is both seductive/kind and cruel to Professor Unrat/Rath. Compare and contrast the character of Rosa Frölich in the novel and Lola Lola in the film. Your essay should address what it is about the film form, specifically, that emphasizes certain characteristics of her persona and what it is about the novel form that emphasizes other characteristics.
 
 
Demonstrate their ability to think critically about the differences and similarities between film and literature as distinct forms of artistic expression. Students also learn about the process of adaptation from one textual source (e.g., a novel or short story) to another (e.g., a film or television series).
 
 
Essay Question

Joan Acocella (New Yorker, January 10, 2011) says that some critics have accused Stieg Larsson of "having his feminism and eating it too.... They say that, under the cover of condemning violence against women, Larsson has supplied, for the reader's enjoyment, quite a few riveting scenes of violence against women." Discuss this issue in relation to the book and one or both of the cinematic adaptations of "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo." How significant is the difference between depicting such acts of sexual violence against women on the page vs. on the screen?
Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 
Identify and explain the importance of the heterogeneous terrain of film theory, and the various areas of convergence as well as debate that characterize this important field of film and media studies through analysis of films produced outside the United States from 1935 to the present.
 
 
Exam Question

Discuss Catherine Breillat's Fat Girl/À ma soeur! in terms, as discussed by Best & Crowley in The new pornographies: explicit sex in recent French fiction and film, of its depiction of female sexuality and gender roles. Your essay should engage with Best and Crowley's arguments while at the same time presenting your own discussion of the film's approach to the representation of sexuality and gender. This is clearly a big topic. Don't feel you need to address all of the ways in which the film tackles these issues. Find a point of focus and develop that with specific reference to the film and the assigned readings.
 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 
Compare and contrast film technology, form, style, genre, the representation of gender and sexuality, and production practices from 1935 to the present,as well as analyze cultural and historical contexts through exposure to a variety of national cinemas, including Italian, British, Czechoslovakian, French ,and American.
 
 
Essay Question

Compare and contrast the depiction in Henry James' novel, "The Portrait of a Lady" and Jane Campion’s film adaptation of the story of Isabel Archer, as one of “exploitation and confinement”? How, in other words, is that "exploitation and confinement" expressed in words vs. in the mise-en-scène of Campion's film?
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
not restricted
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
n/a
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
none
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
none
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
see attached schedule
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
see attached schedule
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
see attached schedule
no new resources required

1. Explore the process of translation and transformation in the adaptation of a variety of kinds of written texts–plays, parables, novels, stories, etc.–into films.

2. Consider the ways that literature has been adapted for film in a variety of national and historical contexts.

3. Articulate interpretations within the  critical framework of adaptation, literary, and film studies.

4. Explore the relationship between films and the textual sources with which they engage.  


Student Learning Outcomes

Students will be able to:

1. Analyze the relationship between textual sources (such as novels, short stories, parables, journalistic accounts, etc.) and their cinematic or televisual adaptations, using appropriate film and literary studies terminology.

2. Interpret films as well as works of literature (and the relation between the two) and practice formulating and supporting arguments about them.

3. Demonstrate their ability to think critically about the differences and similarities between film and literature as distinct forms of artistic expression. Students also learn about the process of adaptation from one textual source (e.g., a novel or short story) to another (e.g., a film or television series).

4. Identify and explain the importance of the heterogeneous terrain of film theory, and the various areas of convergence as well as debate that characterize this important field of film and media studies through analysis of films produced outside the United States from 1935 to the present.

5. Compare and contrast film technology, form, style, genre, the representation of gender and sexuality, and production practices from 1935 to the present, as well as analyze cultural and historical contexts through exposure to a variety of national cinemas, including Italian, British, Czechoslovakian, French, and American.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Participation10%Engaging in a prepared manner and completing graded quizzes
Essay30%Three papers of 4-6 pages each will be assigned and graded
Multiple exams60%Both a midterm (25%) and a final exam (35%) will be given in this class
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
see attached schedule
Adding GEP GK, and lengthening abbreviated title.
Key: 2303