Viewing: FB 480 / FB 580 : The Sustainable Bioeconomy

Last approved: Wed, 06 Feb 2019 20:56:00 GMT

Last edit: Wed, 06 Feb 2019 20:55:56 GMT

Changes proposed by: slmcalex
Change Type
Major
FB (Forest Biomaterials)
480
032727
Dual-Level Course
Yes
580
Cross-listed Course
No
The Sustainable Bioeconomy
The Sustainable Bioeconomy
College of Natural Resources
Wood and Paper Science (15WPS)
03.0509
Wood Science and Wood Products/Pulp and Paper Technology.
Term Offering
Fall and Summer
Offered Every Year
Fall 2019
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Distance Education (DELTA)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Richard Venditti
Professor
Graduate Faculty

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Delivery FormatPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
LEC4040NoIn year 1, we expect 20 for 480 level and 20 for 580 level. This course is a requirement for USDA grant program participation: Bioproducts and Bioenergy Program. If the GEP application is approved, we expect enrollment in FB480 to increase to 50 over the next 2 years.


Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
No
The Sustainable Bioeconomy course examines the current and future opportunities and challenges of bioproducts and bioenergy in society. This course explores relationships between society's economic demand for inexpensive energy and products and our responsibility to produce these products in environmentally and socially responsible ways. Students explore a range of bioproduct categories including biofuels, virgin and recycled paper and wood products, and advanced biomaterials. A panel of instructors from multiple disciplines and bioeconomy stakeholders will share their diverse perspectives and experiences in the bioeconomy. Students will learn about careers available in the growing bioeconomy sector and the knowledge and skills necessary for these jobs. This course is intended for students who are declared in a STEM major at an accredited institution.

The development and initial offering of this course is supported by a USDA-granted project intended to increase student awareness of issues and opportunities in the bioeconomy. 


The bioeconomy has emerged as an important national priority because of its tremendous potential for economic growth as well as many other societal benefits it offers (USDA). From a broader economic perspective, the bioeconomy refers to the set of economic activities relating to the invention, development, and production and use of biological products and processes. The bioeconomy can allow Americans to live longer and healthier, reduce our dependence on fossil fuels, address key environmental challenges, transform manufacturing processes, and increase the productivity and scope of the agricultural and forestry sectors while growing new jobs and industries (National Bioeconomy Blueprint, https://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ostp/library/bioeconomy). 


One of the objectives is to attract diverse students in science related majors to appreciate and potentially pursue careers in the bioeconomy. The start up for this class is part of a USDA funded grant to NCSU which entails four years of funding to establish a distance program in the bioeconomy.  The class will be a mandatory class in a series of classes that provide a certificate program in the bioeconomy.  In the first offering of the class, the USDA has provided scholarships for 36 college students and high school science teachers to register for the class.  In perpetuity, this class is expected to be a globally popular course that attracts individuals interested in science based elective classes involved in the bioeconomy.   The course will be offered as a 480/580 level course for the benefit of the undergraduate students and graduate students, many of which will be high school science teachers.


The graduate level course will be differentiated with additional criteria for each assignment. For example, FB480 students will be expected to reference 2-3 sources for their assignments, while FB580 students will be expected to cite 5-6 sources. For Assignment 6, FB480 students will focus on their career development while FB580 students will develop a teaching activity to introduce high school students or non-science peers to the bioeconomy with planned lecture, activity, and assessment.


We are not aware of any similar course offerings by NC State.


We feel the student interest in the course will be significant into the future. When offered as a special topics course for the Fall18, there were 23 grad level students and 18 undergraduates .For the undergraduate level, students will be encouraged to enroll as they hear more about jobs in the bioeconomy in other classes and in the media. Attendance is expected to be further supported with the GEP in Interdisciplinary Studies. For the graduate level course, students in the online masters in Forest Bioproducts will be encouraged to enroll in this course as an elective. We anticipate a new online certificate in Forest Bioproducts that will also support enrollment. The teacher education elements of the course make it also ideal for graduate students in teaching programs. Dr. Margaret Blanchard, Graduate Coordinator Science Education with the College of Education is involved in the development of the course and will encourage Masters in Teaching students to take this course as part of their 18 required science credits.


We intend to make this course the first of five new courses that will become part of an undergraduate and graduate certificate in Sustainable Bioproducts and Bioenergy. The course series will include: The Sustainable Bioeconomy, Biomass Conversion Processes to Create Sustainable Products, Growth and Production of Plant Biomass for Bioproducts, Environmental Sustainability for the Bioeconomy, Business Leadership for the Bioeconomy. 


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Interdisciplinary Perspectives
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
After completion of this course, students will be able to analyze the environmental, economic, and social impacts of industrial practices within the bioeconomy. (Disciplines: Science and technology, economics, environmental studies)
 
 
Students will examine and compare current and historical environmental issues caused by various industrial practices including land use, air quality, and water quality within assignments and forum discussion topics.

Assignment 3 (Option A: Case study about Environmental Justice issues at Mill pollution sites. ) will require students to examine pollution issues from distinct economic, environmental, and social perspectives.

Sample Measure:
5. Select, summarize, and critically analyze 3 peer-reviewed articles about one sector of the bioeconomy. Select articles that represent differing perspectives such as economic, environmental, social, etc. Grad students should select primary research articles. Undergraduates may select primary research articles or review articles. Findings should be presented in the form of an annotated bibliography.
 
 
After completion of this course, students will be able to construct and evaluate arguments regarding society's energy demands and pros and cons of various energy sources. (Disciplines: Science and technology, economics, environmental studies).

After completion of this course, students will be able to identify advantages and disadvantages of the bioeconomy relative to a petroleum-based economy. (Disciplines covered Science and technology, economics, environmental studies)
 
 
Students will assess and evaluate arguments about domestic energy and heat demands, diversification, and the associated advantages and disadvantages of these sources. This includes the comparison of coal, petroleum, natural gas, biogas, bio-ethanol, and biodiesel. They will also examine the "Food vs Fuel" debate regarding agricultural growth of biomass instead of food. Students will read literature reviews and participate in discussion forums regarding the connections between economic, social, and environmental issues.

Sample Measures:
Assignment 2: Students will conduct a case study examining the "Food vs. Fuel debate" requiring them to connect economic, social, and environmental issues.

Assignment 3 (Option B: Applying sustainable development concepts to compare types of building materials using life cycle analysis tools and Option C: Case study about social, economic, and environmental basis for paper recycling including Life Cycle Analysis) will require students to examine connections between economic, social, and environmental issues.
 
 
After completion of this course, students will be able to describe the interactions and roles of different stakeholders in the bioeconomy including producers, regulators, politicians, and end-users. (Disciplines: Science and technology, economics, and environmental studies)

After completion of this course, students will be able to describe the major biomass to biopower and bioproducts pathways and analyze differences in energy, waste, raw material usage, and environmental impacts in these pathways (Disciplines: Science and technology, environmental studies)
 
 
Students will meet stakeholders through video interviews and will have the opportunity to ask them questions about careers and other issues within the bioeconomy. Students will synthesize content from various disciplines in discussion forums and assignments.

Faculty experts will introduce students to the bioconversion process. Students will be able to articulate the process by which inexpensive biomass is converted into valuable bioenergy and bioproducts. Students will define motivations of different stakeholders and synthesize content from various disciplines in discussion forums and assignments. Student assignments will highlight specific bioproduct categories allows students to become deeply knowledgeable on a specific industry of their interest. They will then share their expertise with the class demonstrating the positives and negatives of the industry from technical, social, and environmental perspectives.

Sample Measures:
Assignment 1: Create a company/organization profile. Identify (at least 5) diverse stakeholders involved in the organization and explain “sustainability” from each of their perspectives. What expectations do you have for similarities and differences in their perspectives?

Assignment 4: Select a product/product-line that uses Advanced Biomaterials and describe economic and environmental influences (at least 4) on this product/company. Create a 2-3min video for your peers. Alternate, Write-up a short report (2 page, double-spaced) on the same topic. Attach file or post link on Moodle
 
 
This course will explore the impact of bioproducts and bioenergy products on society, examined from the broad interdisciplinary perspectives of science/technology, economics, and environmental studies.
 
 
Guest lecturers and speakers including various stakeholders and professionals from various bioproduct and bioenergy sectors have agreed to support the efforts of the academic program. Video interviews will be conducted regarding various course topics. Students will be able to ask questions of the panelists about their careers and/or other issues pertaining to the bioeconomy. Samples Guest lecturers and speakers: Ronalds Gonzalez, Assistant Professor, Department of Forest Biomaterials, focus on economics Elizabeth Nichols, Professor, Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources, focus on environmental management and technology Yuan Yao, Assistant Professor of Sustainability Science and Engineering, Department of Forest Biomaterials, focus on economic, social, and environmental sustainability. Kelly Spence, Environmental Engineer, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, focus on air quality Mike Dennison, Retired, Procter and Gamble, focus on industry workforce elements
Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
NA
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
NA
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
N/A
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
NA
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
See attached syllabus.
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
See attached syllabus.
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
See attached syllabus.
College(s)Contact NameStatement Summary
College of Agriculture and Life SciencesXiaoyong Zheng, DGPThis course is sufficiently different from the courses currently offered by the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
The USDA grant supports resources for this course including instructor release money, a distance education program manager, a distance education media technician, a teaching assistant, and marketing and administrative services. Currently, the Forest Biomaterials Department has adequate instructor staffing and resources to serve this class. DELTA is also supporting the development and implementation of this course.

The Following guest lecturers and speakers have also agreed to contribute to the course materials:
Ronalds Gonzalez, Assistant Professor, Department of Forest Biomaterials, focus on economics
Elizabeth Nichols, Professor, Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources, focus on environmental management and technology
Yuan Yao, Assistant Professor of Sustainability Science and Engineering, Department of Forest Biomaterials, focus on economic, social, and environmental sustainability.
Kelly Spence, Environmental Engineer, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, focus on air quality
Mike Dennison, Retired, Procter and Gamble, focus on industry workforce elements

1. Students will develop a deep appreciation of the value and challenges of the bioeconomy to society by exploring its environmental, economic, social, and political influences and impacts.


2. Students will explore the perspectives of various different stakeholders within in the bioeconomy including producers, regulators, politicians, and end-users.


3. Students will explore different career options and paths within the bioeconomy and will understand the steps required to pursue these careers.


4. Students will discover how biomass is converted into bioproducts, power, and biofuels.


5. Students will practice the application of software tools useful in bioeconomy industries.


Student Learning Outcomes

After completion of this course students will be able to:


1. analyze the environmental, economic, and social impacts of industrial practices within the bioeconomy.


2. construct and evaluate arguments regarding society's energy demands and pros and cons of various energy sources.


3. identify advantages and disadvantages of the bioeconomy relative to a petroleum-based economy.


4. describe the interactions and roles of different stakeholders in the bioeconomy including producers, regulators, politicians, and end-users.


5. describe the major biomass to biopower and bioproducts pathways and analyze differences in energy, waste, raw material usage, and environmental impacts in these pathways.


6. identify and distinguish needed skills and activities for various jobs within in the bioeconomy.


7. apply Excel, Powerpoint, OpenLCA, and other software tools to define and communicate the benefits and costs of segments of the bioeconomy.


8. (For 580) create educational lessons for student audiences. These lessons increase student awareness of the bioeconomy and translate technical content into engaging activities.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Quizzes20%There will be eight short quizzes to check for understanding throughout the course. These will be worth 40 out of 200 points.
Multiple exams30%There will be three exams. The first exam will cover issues regarding sustainability, biomass production, power, heat, and biofuels. The second exam will cover issues regarding wood and paper. The third exam will focus on issues regarding advanced biomaterials. These will be worth 60 out of 200 points.
Forum_post20%There will be 20 class discussion forums where you will be asked to reflect, analyze, or discuss course materials, readings, or other activities. These will be worth 40 out of 200 points.
Written Assignment30%There are 6 assignments. These will be worth 60 out of 200 points.
1. Company/Organizational Profile- What is sustainability?
2. "Food vs. Fuel" Case Study
3. Pick your own Case Study: Environmental Justice/Mill Pollution, Comparison of Building materials with LCA, Social/Economic factors of paper recycling with LCA.
3. Advanced Biomaterial Profile: Economic influences/impacts
4. Critical analysis of literature: Annotated Bibliography- Compare/Contrasting perspectives on bioeconomy sector. Differentiated for undergrad/grad.
6. Undergrad: Career reflection with resume and coverletter. Graduate student: Develop student-directed lesson on sustainability in the bioeconomy.

TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
N/A- See Syllabus
The attached Course Activities file shows specific details regarding the schedule and layout of the course, granular topics, scoring, roles and responsibilities, and estimated time for each activity.

mlnosbis 3/27/2018:
1) We recommend that all new courses are first taught at least twice on a trial basis under special topics. According to this course action, this was not taught as special topics. Do you have other evidence that illustrates the interest in this course material to warrant a new course?

For the graduate level course, students in the online masters in Forest Bioproducts will be encouraged to enroll in this course as an elective. We anticipate a new online certificate in Forest Bioproducts that will also support enrollment. The teacher education elements of the course make it also ideal for graduate students in teaching programs. Dr. Margaret Blanchard, Graduate Coordinator Science Education with the College of Education is involved in the development of the course and will encourage Masters in Teaching students to take this course as part of their 18 required science credits.

2) Syllabus needs to general NC State PRR disclaimer. See Graduate Syllabus Checklist attached under additional documentation.
Done

cohen (3/27/2018):
1. Given the description of Assignment 6, it would appear that there should be an additional learning outcome for the graduate section.
Done
2. On the syllabus under grading, delete the last sentence describing the quizzes.
Done

3. Students may not take 580 for credit only. Please make that clear on the syllabus.
Done
4. Will you allow make-up work for an unforeseen emergency as well? Such events may not be known in advance and so prior approval may not be possible.
Done

ABGS Reviewer Comments 8/16/2018:
-the FB 580 element in the FB 480 proposal could be finessed by offering it as FB 590 for a time or two. RESPONSE: Will send to Administrative Board for feedback.
-the grading system looks correct in the syllabus but not in the online system. For example quizzes are 20% in the syllabus but 20% divided by 5 in the online system. The syllabus looks fine.
Weighting has been adjusted to show percentages only.
medbyrd (Wed, 24 Jan 2018 22:29:36 GMT): Rollback: See my email about issues that could cause problems at UCCC.
aeherget (Mon, 12 Feb 2018 16:36:58 GMT): AECHH: Uploading updated syllabus and removing restrictive statement at instructor's request via email Feb. 12, 2018.
aeherget (Wed, 21 Feb 2018 21:34:33 GMT): AECHH: Removing Scheduling requirement based on the friendly suggestion at the Feb. 21, 2018, UCCC meeting at the request of the instructor via phone call (Feb. 21, 2018. 4: 34 PM).
slmcalex (Thu, 24 Jan 2019 16:11:05 GMT): While the original application was for Fall2018, we decided to test the course as a special topics first. Following a successful term, we would like to resubit this course for Graduate School review for Fall2019.
Key: 23240
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