Viewing: ENG 420 : Major American Author

Last approved: Tue, 14 Nov 2017 22:02:26 GMT

Last edit: Tue, 14 Nov 2017 22:02:26 GMT

Changes proposed by: krbell3
Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
Major
ENG (English)
420
008650
Dual-Level Course
No
Cross-listed Course
No
Major American Author
Major American Author
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
English (16ENG)
23.0101
English Language and Literature, General.
Term Offering
Fall Only
Offered Every Year
Fall 2017
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)


If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
Yes
3
 
 
9
Jennifer Nolan
Assistant Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture3030Non/a
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16ENGBA-16LLTEnglish BA-LiteratureElective
16ENGLBAEnglish BAElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLCRWEnglish BA-Creative WritingElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLFLMEnglish BA-FilmElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLLWREnglish BA-Language, Writing, and RhetoricElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLTEDEnglish BA-Teacher EducationElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLMEnglish BA-MinorElective
Intensive study of the writings of one (or two) American author(s). Developments across the career, relationships between the writing and the life, the writer's participation in a culture and an historical moment. Sample subjects: Emerson and Thoreau, Melville, Whitman, Stowe and Douglass, Dickinson, Twain, James and Wharton, Frost, O'Neill, Fitzgerald and Hemingway, Faulkner, Hurston and Wright, O'Conner, Morrison.

GEP HUM Review. 


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Humanities
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Examine, interpret, and analyze how F. Scott Fitzgerald’s works reflect, critique, and encourage readers to think critically about the social, historical, and cultural contexts in which they were written and the human experience more broadly.
 
 
Class Preparation Assignments (i.e., 1-2 page assignments written in preparation for class)

Sample Prompt: The purpose of this assignment is to allow you to demonstrate your engagement with the stories we have read thus far and to gain a sense of how Fitzgerald is developing as an author. Using “The Sensible Thing” and at least one of the other stories we’ve read, please address one of the following in 1-2 pages: (1) Fitzgerald’s depiction of young women; (2) interpersonal relationships (romantic or not) in Fitzgerald's fiction; (3) the reality beneath the surface; (4) what money can and cannot accomplish.
 
 
Analyze how historical, cultural, and social contexts influence how literature is produced, interpreted, read, and understood.
 
 
Print Culture Project

Summary:
To understand F. Scott Fitzgerald’s reputation as an author and the reception of his works throughout the twentieth century and beyond, it is necessary to consider the contexts in which his audiences were presented with them. To this end, this project asks students to examine the context surrounding either the original printing of one of Fitzgerald's later Saturday Evening Post stories or one posthumously published paperback edition of The Great Gatsby. Students will analyze how the paratextual features surrounding Fitzgerald's text suggested interpretations of both the text and its author and the extent to which this reading aligns with, softens, challenges, contradicts, and/or suggests an alternate interpretation of Fitzgerald’s text.
 
 
Identify, compare, analyze, and craft academic arguments supported with existing scholarship, as well as historical, cultural, textual and/or paratextual evidence concerning a variety of cultural interpretations of literature, including, but not limited to, literary analyses, editorial and marketing decisions, and film adaptations.
 
 
(1) Annotated Bibliography
Summary: This assignment requires students to provide an introduction to scholarly research concerning one topic related to one or more of the works we read by F. Scott Fitzgerald. Students will be required to identify 8-10 peer-reviewed sources on their chosen topic and create individual entries for each of them providing an overview of the main argument of the work and an evaluation of its effectiveness, usefulness, strengths, and/or weaknesses. They will also be asked to pull their research together by providing an overview of the ways in which scholars have debated their topic within the sources they have analyzed.

(2) Class Preparation Assignments
Sample Prompt: In writing about the process of adapting a work of literature into a film, Horton Foote, the playwright and academy award-winning screenwriter of To Kill a Mockingbird (1962), said the following: though “a film has its own rhythm, its own life . . . when you try to get inside the world of another writer you’re under constant tension not to violate this person’s vision” ("Writing for Film," 19,7). This class preparation assignment asks you to consider how well the 1949 version of The Great Gatsby accomplishes this goal.

Using evidence from the film and specific passages and quotes from the novel please write 1-2 pages addressing to what extent the film successfully represents Fitzgerald's vision. While it may be instructive to consider differences between the book and the film when addressing this question, keep in mind that it is not simply about how faithful (or not) the film is to the text, but rather whether interpretative decisions - both fidelities and changes - ultimately support, violate, or fundamentally change Fitzgerald's vision or purpose.
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
N/A
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
N/A
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
None
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
N/A
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
The Great Gatsby ($16.00)
Tender is the Night ($16.00)
The Love of the Last Tycoon ($14.00)
The Short Stories of F. Scott Fitzgerald, Matthew J. Bruccoli, ed. ($23.00)
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
Early Career:
“Bernice Bobs Her Hair” (Saturday Evening Post, May 1, 1920); “May Day” (The Smart Set, July 1920); Gatsby-cluster stories: “Winter Dreams” (Metropolitan Magazine, December 1922); “The Sensible Thing” (Liberty, July 1924); "Absolution" (The American Mercury, June 1924)
Non-Fiction: “Early Success” (American Cavalcade, October 1937); “How to Live on $36,000 a Year" (Saturday Evening Post, April 5, 1924)

The Great Gatsby

Post-Gatsby Short Fiction:
“The Rich Boy” (Red Book, January & February 1926); “Jacob’s Ladder” (Saturday Evening Post, August 20, 1927) “The Last of the Belles” (Saturday Evening Post, March 2, 1929); “One Trip Abroad” (Saturday Evening Post, October 11, 1930); “Echoes of the Jazz Age” (Scribner’s November 1931); “Babylon Revisited” (Saturday Evening Post, February 21, 1931)

Tender is the Night (1934)

“The Crack-Up” (Esquire, February 1936) & “The Lost Decade” (Esquire, December 1939)

The Love of the Last Tycoon (1941)
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
N/A
No new resources needed. HUM review.

Student Learning Outcomes

1. Examine, interpret, and analyze how F. Scott Fitzgerald’s works reflect, critique, and encourage readers to think critically about the social, historical, and cultural contexts in which they were written and the human experience more broadly.

2. Analyze how historical, cultural, and social contexts influence how literature is produced, interpreted, read, and understood. 

3. Identify, compare, analyze, and craft academic arguments supported with existing scholarship, as well as historical, cultural, textual and/or paratextual evidence concerning a variety of cultural interpretations of literature, including, but not limited to, literary analyses, editorial and marketing decisions, and film adaptations. 


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Major Paper30%Print Culture Paper about the printing history of Fitzgerald's stories and novels
presentation10%Presentation of Print Culture Paper
Other10%Proposal of topic for Print Culture Paper and draft of annotated bibliography
Other30%Final completed bibliography
Discussion10%Class Preparation Assignments 
Quizzes10%Reading Quizzes and active participation

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