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Viewing: ENG 465 : British Literature and the Dissolution of Empire

Last approved: Tue, 11 Oct 2016 08:01:33 GMT

Last edit: Mon, 10 Oct 2016 14:29:28 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
Major
ENG (English)
465
008679
Dual-Level Course
No
Cross-listed Course
No
British Literature and the Dissolution of Empire
Brit Lit Dissolution Empire
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
English (16ENG)
Term Offering
Fall and Spring
Offered Alternate Years
Fall 2017
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Laura Severin
Professor/Dr.

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture3535NoN/A
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16ENGBA-LLTEnglish BA-LiteratureElective
16ENGLBAEnglish BAElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLCRWEnglish BA-Creative WritingElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLFLMEnglish BA-FilmElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLLWREnglish BA-Language, Writing, and RhetoricElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLTEDEnglish BA-Teacher EducationElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLMEnglish BA-MinorElective
This course examines the role of British literature in the dissolution of empire and the reshaping of Britain as a multicultural society. As poet Louise Bennett wryly comments, the 20th century British experience is one of "colonization in reverse." From the departure of the colonies, to the impact of American expatriates and Caribbean, African and South Asian immigrants, to the Scottish nationalist critique, this period is one of radical change in British national identity. At the center of that change are the global writers who create a heterogeneous literature that represents both a "new" British literature and a post-empire reality.

We are reconfiguring ENG 464 and 465 to reflect current changes in the discipline.  Twentieth-century and contemporary British literature is now most often taught in a global context because of the impact of Britain’s imperial past.  Colonization, migration and devolution have increasingly problematized what constitutes British literature, literary periods, and British identity.  In order to foreground the impact of empire, this sequence of courses will start earlier, with the rise of British Empire in ENG 464, and continue with the dissolution of the British Empire in ENG 465. Both courses will feature literature by writers from Britain and colonial or post-colonial writers.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Global Knowledge
Humanities
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Interpret works of twentieth and twenty-first century global British literature within their historical and cultural context and within the context of British colonialism and Empire.
 
 
Final Exam questions
Sample Essay Question: How is the British Empire’s mission and value defined and then redefined through the literature of Kipling, Forster, and post-World War II writers?
 
 
Analyze, evaluate, and/or synthesize different interpretations of literary texts, using literary texts to demonstrate the different interpretations of the same cultural events.
 
 
Critical Essay
Sample Essay Question: Using the reception history of Forster’s Passage to India, discuss whether the novel should be read as a critique or an apology for Britain’s role in India. What role should the answer to this question have in assessing Forster’s place in the British canon?
 
 
Compose critical responses to the question of how global British literature has defined what constitutes British identity and British citizenship in a post-empire world.
 
 
Final Exam questions
Sample Essay Question: In what ways have critics read Buddha of Suburbia as a portrait of contemporary Britain? Is this perspective accurate, limiting, or a combination of both?
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 
Examine how twentieth and twenty-first century Britain’s changing colonial relations and increasingly heterogeneous migration patterns gave rise to a more diverse literature and a new, post-empire identity.
 
 
Final Exam questions
Sample Essay Question: How does Buddha of Suburbia reflect a post-World War II change in British ideas, values, and images?
 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 
Compare perceptions of the British Empire in literature between those writers born in the United Kingdom and those who migrated to the United Kingdom from the U.S., Africa, the Caribbean or India, as well as post-colonial writers focusing on the legacy of empire.
 
 
Final Exam questions
Sample Essay Question: How do American expatriates writing in the interwar period characterize British society and culture in modernist works of literature? What accounts for the difference in perception between these early immigrants and those who were to follow after World War II?
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
70%
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
30% reserved for English majors
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
Yes
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
Sophomore Standing
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
None
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
Required Texts
Joseph Black et al., The Broadview Anthology of British Literature: The Twentieth Century and Beyond (ISBN 1551116146, 2008, $20.15)
E. M. Forster, A Passage to India (1924; reprint ASIN BOODS8YQWE Penguin, 2005, $5.68)
Hanif Kureishi, The Buddha of Suburbia (1990; reprint 014013168X Penguin, 1991, $11.77)
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
Topic per week; see syllabus.
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
None
Required Texts
Joseph Black et al., The Broadview Anthology of British Literature: The Twentieth Century and Beyond (ISBN 1551116146, 2008, $20.15)
E. M. Forster, A Passage to India (1924; reprint ASIN BOODS8YQWE Penguin, 2005, $5.68)
Hanif Kureishi, The Buddha of Suburbia (1990; reprint 014013168X Penguin, 1991, $11.77)

All readings are in the anthology, with the exception of the two novels and sources cited as “online.” Online materials are available on the course moodle website: http://wolfware.ncsu.edu.

  1. Interpret how British literature commented on and contributed to the dissolution of the British Empire and the reshaping of post-empire identity.

  2. Examine how writing about the British Empire reflects changing ideas about what empire means and how it was created

  3. Examine how determining factors such as race, ethnicity, class, gender and sexuality impact understanding of the British Empire and its legacy.

  4. Learn to make critical arguments about colonialism, empire and imperialism by making reference to the literary texts read for the class.

  5. Gain experience with the critical traditions of analysis of the British Empire as it is developed from history, theories of globalization, and postcolonial theories.


Student Learning Outcomes

Students will be able to:



  1. Identify major shifts in the history of the British Empire between 1900 and the present and identify how those shifts affected the composition of literature in English.

  2. Construct arguments that assert positions about major changes in literature composed in response to the dissolution of the British Empire between 1900 and the present.

  3. Explain how issues of race, ethnicity, class, gender and sexuality affect understanding of the legacy of British Empire.

  4. Critically evaluate and interpret primary sources (literary texts)

  5. Critically evaluate and interpret secondary sources (critical essays) as well as comprehend the historical and contemporary contexts of cultural texts.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Essay40%2 Papers
Multiple exams40%Midterm and Final
Homework10%Daily Writing
Participation10%Daily Class Participation
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
See syllabus

aeherget (Fri, 09 Sep 2016 19:40:16 GMT): AECHH: Sophomore standing not a "pre-requisite".
Key: 2336