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Viewing: ENG 470 : American Literature, Twentieth Century and Beyond

Last approved: Fri, 23 Dec 2016 09:02:07 GMT

Last edit: Fri, 23 Dec 2016 09:02:07 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
Major
ENG (English)
470
008685
Dual-Level Course
No
Cross-listed Course
No
American Literature, Twentieth Century and Beyond
American Lit 20C and Beyond
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
English (16ENG)
Term Offering
Fall and Spring
Offered Alternate Years
Fall 2017
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Jon Thompson
Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture3535NoN/A
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Requisite: Sophomore Standing or Above
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16ENGBA-16LLTEnglish BA - LiteratureElective
16ENGLBAEnglish BA Elective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLCRWEnglish BA- Creative WritingElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLFLMEnglish BA- FilmElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLLWREnglish BA- Language, Writing, and RhetoricElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLTEDEnglish BA- Teacher EducationElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLMEnglish BA- Minor Elective
American Literature from the twentieth century until the present day. Readings from various genres such as fiction, non-fiction, drama and poetry. Emphasis will be on key literary developments in relation to important critical/cultural contexts. Representative writers: F. Scott Fitzgerald, Gwendolyn Brooks, Zora Neale Hurston, James Baldwin, David Mamet, and Maxine Hong Kingston.

GEP HUM review and part of the revisions for the new Literature Program concentration.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Humanities
US Diversity
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Interpret a variety of genres from critical perspectives that illuminate the transformations American literature has undergone from the twentieth century until the present day.
 
 
Critical essays.
Sample essay question: THE GREAT GATSBY is deeply interested in evaluating money and materialism as shaping forces in American society. How does the novel envision money? What is its power, what is its influence? For Fitzgerald, what are the perils of the single-minded pursuit of wealth? What are the costs for the individual—and what are the costs for society at large? How does this novel think about the relationship between money and class? What key images of money does the novel use to dramatize its vision? Discuss.
 
 
Analyze, evaluate and/or synthesize different interpretations of literary texts, using literary texts to demonstrate the different interpretations that can be made of the formal elements of literature with reference to important critical or cultural contexts.
 
 
Critical essays.
Sample essay question: Allen Ginsberg's "HOWL" is regarded as one of the seminal texts of twentieth-century American literature. Despite its influence, it has not escaped criticism. The poet/critic John Hollander charged that the poem is basically "the ravings of a lunatic," that it is made up of "screams" and that its chief interest is to those friends "who populate this disturbed pantheon." Essentially, Hollander was charging Ginsberg with writing a poem that was self-indulgent, emotionally undisciplined and of interest chiefly to hipsters who shared Ginsberg's disaffection. Engage Hollander's criticisms by agreeing or disagreeing with his argument.
If you disagree with Hollander's criticisms, what justifies a more receptive approach to the poem. What key issue or issues does it engage and how does it evaluate them? Why is the style of the poem more than just "ravings"? Discuss.
 
 
Conduct critical research on the human experience using argumentation and evidence for interpretive discussion and analysis appropriate to knowledge acquisition in the humanities.
 
 
Critical essays.
Sample essay question: David Mamet's play GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS is a play that investigates the pressures of capitalism through the lives of "hard-sell," vacation property real-estate salesmen. What is Mamet's vision of American capitalism in the play? American capitalism is often seen as open to all, and freer than other models of capitalism. To what extent does Mamet see American capitalism as hierarchical? For Mamet, how is profit created in the American model? What role does advertising and promotion (as well as salesmenship) play? To what extent does the American model of capitalism create freedom--and for whom? What defining image of capitalism do you see at work in the play? Discuss.
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 
Interpret a variety of texts from social, historical and cultural perspectives, articulating the ways in which cultural and societal influences shape gender, racial, ethnic, and/or class identities.
 
 
Critical essay.
Sample essay question: In James Baldwin's short story, "Going to Meet the Man," Baldwin examines the way in which the values of the Jim Crow South shapes white attitudes towards blacks but also white identity itself. Discuss Baldwin's complex sense of the seductions of racism: for white segregationists, why is it so attractive? What image of white identity does it provide? How does it work to project an animalized identity onto African Americans? In what ways for Baldwin does racism become eroticized? Discuss.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
Analyze various ways in which American literature represents interactions between different religious, gender, ethnic, racial, class, sexual orientation, disability and/or age groups.
 
 
Critical essays.
Sample essay question: In Annie Proulx's celebrated novella, "Brokeback Mountain," published in her collection CLOSE RANGE, Proulx examines the complexities of homoerotic love in the context of a culture that is decidedly macho and heterosexual. At the core of the novella is an examination of the conflict in male identity in the American West which ratifies a "Marlboro Man" masculinity but is intolerant of any deviation from that norm, especially when it comes to homosexual love. Discuss Annie Proulx's investigation of male identity in "Brokeback Mountain." In what ways does the novella suggest that both straight men and gay men are damaged by the macho ideal? What are the damages sustained by straight men who attempt to live up to the ideal and what are the damages are sustained by gay men who try to also live up to that ideal? Does Proulx see any hope for a more liberating form of masculinity in the West? Discuss.
Requisites and Scheduling
70%
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
30% of seats will be restricted to English Majors.
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
NA
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
Sophomore standing.
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
none
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
See attached syllabus.
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
See attached syllabus.
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
NA
College(s)Contact NameStatement Summary
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
No new resources needed.

Students will:


1. Interpret a variety of genres (for example, fiction, autobiography, drama and poetry) from critical perspectives that illuminate important transformations American literature has undergone in this period.


2. Analyze the relationship between form, content, and meaning.


3. Conduct critical research that casts light on the literary/cultural dimensions of American literature of this period.


4. Create well-constructed arguments.


5. Demonstrate their proficiency as critical writers in terms of critical development and stylistic clarity.


Student Learning Outcomes

Students will be able to:


1. Identify major movements in American literature from the twentieth century and after.


2. Identify key historical and cultural moments to which American literature in this period is responding.


3. Identify the role diversity plays in transforming American literature in this period.


4. Identify important formal innovations in American literature in this period.


5. Critically evaluate primary sources (literary texts) and secondary sources (essays and book chapters).


6. Develop critical thinking skills and critical writing skills.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Essay40%Thesis-driven critical essays with emphasis placed upon development of the argument with appropriate support, including critical sources.
Multiple exams40%Exams will consist of a midterm and a final exam, both of which will be in class. Both exams will emphasize critical analysis and critical writing.
Participation10%Participation of various kinds is regarded as key. The various forms of participation and the ways in which participation is evaluated are spelled out in the syllabus.
Quizzes10%Daily quizzes on assigned reading with an emphasis on the content of the texts.
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
See syllabus

n51ls801 (Fri, 04 Nov 2016 19:11:26 GMT): Need syllabus for ENG 470.
n51ls801 (Fri, 04 Nov 2016 19:11:55 GMT): Rollback: Need syllabus for ENG 470, not ENG 481.
aeherget (Fri, 11 Nov 2016 14:41:05 GMT): AECHH: Adjusting restrictive statement at instructor's request via email. 11/11/2016
Key: 2342