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Viewing: HI 340 : History of Agriculture

Last approved: Sat, 21 Apr 2018 08:00:35 GMT

Last edit: Fri, 20 Apr 2018 14:45:00 GMT

Change Type
HI (History)
340
011551
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
History of Agriculture
History of Agriculture
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
History (16HI)
Term Offering
Spring Only
Offered Every Year
Fall 2018
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Tate Paulette
Assistant Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture3535No
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote


Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16HISTBAHistory – BAElective
16HISTBSHistory – BSElective
16HIMHistory MinorElective
An introduction to the history of agriculture from a global perspective. The course explores our evolving relationship with plants and animals, including the earliest experiments in domestication and husbandry, short- and long-term developmental trajectories, local- and global-scale patterns, and coverage of diverse places and times. Themes include agricultural practices, food systems, landscape transformations, technological innovations, social and political organization, inequality, exploitation, food security, and sustainability.

Despite NC State’s longstanding commitment to agriculture as a field of study, only recently has a course been offered in agricultural history. Building on the success of this course in American Agricultural History, the proposed course will broaden the chronological and geographical scope to provide a long-term, comparative history of agriculture on a global scale. I was specifically hired to develop courses that introduce students to this broader perspective on the history of agriculture. 


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Global Knowledge
Humanities
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Identify particular forms of agriculture and particular agricultural practices – their long-term history of development, their economic costs and benefits, their impact on the environment, and their social, political, and cultural ramifications.
 
 
Students will write a paper that focuses on a particular agricultural product and a particular time and place. The paper will consider the technologies and techniques that were needed to produce this item, the organization of production, related landscape modifications, and the social, political, and cultural context of production.
 
 
Critically interpret a wide variety of historical sources.
 
 
Students will write a paper that examines three different pieces of evidence (a written document, an artistic representation, and an archaeological artifact), all deriving from the same time and place and all related in some way to agriculture. The paper will situate these pieces of evidence within their broader historical context and will consider the specific kinds of information that each can provide.
 
 
Explain the particular challenges and potentials of these different types of evidence and different modes of engaging with the past.
 
 
Students will write a paper that examines three different pieces of evidence (a written document, an artistic representation, and an archaeological artifact), all deriving from the same time and place and all related in some way to agriculture. The paper will situate these pieces of evidence within their broader historical context and will consider the specific kinds of information that each can provide.
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 
Identify and examine the distinguishing characteristics of agricultural systems (agricultural practices, food systems, landscape transformations, technological innovations, social and political organization, inequality and exploitation, food security, and sustainability) in a wide range of societies from the ancient world to the present day.
 
 
On the midterm exam, students will answer an essay question that asks them to compare agricultural systems in two different societies. For example, they might be asked to compare the technologies, the landscape transformations, and the forms of social and political organization necessary to undertake irrigation agriculture in ancient Mesopotamia and ancient China.
 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 
Compare the distinguishing characteristics of agricultural systems in two different societies.
 
 
On the midterm exam, students will answer an essay question that asks them to compare agricultural systems in two different societies. For example, they might be asked to compare the technologies, the landscape transformations, and the forms of social and political organization necessary to undertake irrigation agriculture in ancient Mesopotamia and ancient China.
 
 
Explain how the distinguishing characteristics of these agricultural systems relate to one another and to their broader cultural and historical context.
 
 
On the final exam, students will answer an essay question that asks them to analyze the social, cultural, political, and/or economic implications of a major agricultural innovation. For example, they might be asked to consider how traditional agricultural practices and long-standing patterns of social interaction in twentieth century India were impacted by the suite of agricultural innovations known as the Green Revolution.
 
 
Explain how the distinguishing characteristics of these agricultural systems changed in response to internal and external pressures.
 
 
On the final exam, students will answer an essay question that asks them to analyze the social, cultural, political, and/or economic implications of a major agricultural innovation. For example, they might be asked to consider how traditional agricultural practices and long-standing patterns of social interaction in twentieth century India were impacted by the suite of agricultural innovations known as the Green Revolution.
US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100%
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
N/A
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
N/A
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
N/A
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
N/A
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
see Syllabus
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
see Syllabus
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
see Syllabus
The course will be in the standard course load of offerings by the newly hired instructor, with no additional resources required.

Students will:


1) Strengthen their historical perspective by being able to pose sound historical questions about the long-term, comparative history of agricultural systems on a global scale;


2) Strengthen their historical perspective by being able to show how agricultural practices and food systems in the past and the present are intimately bound up with specific forms of social, political, and economic organization;


3) Strengthen their historical perspective by being able to show how issues of food security and sustainability were conceptualized, combatted, and/or exacerbated by a broad range of past societies;


4) Strengthen their ability to apply sound historical reasoning and research skills by being able to pose and answer questions about the intended and unintended consequences of technological innovations and landscape transformations designed to improve, simplify, and/or radically alter agricultural systems;


5) Strengthen their ability to apply sound historical reasoning and research skills by being able to pose and answer questions about the ways in which specific food systems of the past and present have been built on and/or have produced significant degrees of inequality and exploitation.


Student Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

1. Pose sound historical questions about the long-term, comparative history of agricultural systems on a global scale;

2. Analyze and compare particular societies of the past and present in order to show how agricultural practices and food systems are intimately bound up with specific forms of social, political, and economic organization;

3. Analyze and compare particular past societies in order to show how issues of food security and sustainability were conceptualized, combatted, and/or exacerbated;

4. Critically examine and integrate primary and secondary source material in order to pose and answer questions about the intended and unintended consequences of technological innovations and landscape transformations designed to improve, simplify, and/or radically alter agricultural systems;

5. Critically examine and integrate primary and secondary source material in order to pose and answer questions about the ways in which specific food systems of the past and present have been built on and/or have produced significant degrees of inequality and exploitation.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Short Paper25%See syllabus
Midterm25%See syllabus
Short Paper25%See syllabus
Final Exam25%See syllabus
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Syllabus attached

Key: 23690