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Viewing: HI 323 : Science, American Style

Last approved: Wed, 30 May 2018 08:01:19 GMT

Last edit: Tue, 29 May 2018 20:05:05 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
Major
HI (History)
323
032626
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Science, American Style
Science, American Style
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
History (16HI)
Term Offering
Spring Only
Offered Every Year
Fall 2018
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Dr. Paul Brinkman
Adjunct Teaching Associate Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture3535No
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote


Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16HISTBAHistory BAElective
16HISTBSHistory BSElective
16HIMHistory MinorElective
Exploration of the distinctive nature of American science and its place in American culture. Analysis of the historical context of developments, such as early contributions to science, natural history, and paleontology; the growth of professionalization of science; ideas about scientific management and social applications such as eugenics; and the creation of the atomic bomb and the rise of "Big Science" after WWII.

Historical scholarship on more recent developments of American science and its distinctive interests and practices are difficult to incorporate into the already rich, full content of our current courses in history of science. The history of science in America is a substantial specialization in the scholarly literature, and the course will provide access to this scholarship to a wide range of students, as a GEP Interdisciplinary Perspectives course and as an elective in the History and the Science, Technology & Society degrees.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Interdisciplinary Perspectives
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Identify examples of how objects, practices, and ideas in science are culturally embedded and have histories.
 
 
Two short papers in which students will examine historical documents, about the proposal for establishing a scientific society in America and a patent application, respectively. In their analytical papers, students will address the historical and scientific contexts of each example, identifying the scientific ideas or practices involved and how they were distinctive in the American historical context.
 
 
Identify the larger historical context in which American science developed its distinctive practices and place in national culture.
 
 
Exam essay on the intersection of scientific concepts, technical ability, political culture, and government funding for large-scale technoscience developments, such as the Manhattan project or the space race.
 
 
Articulate the relationship between the practices of science and the cultural values and developments that both created and were impacted by the rise of science.
 
 
Sciences that are analyzed with primary source documents in the course include natural history (ecology), paleontology, physics, evolutionary biology, genetics, and the applications of physical sciences in engineering. Students will write an exam essay in which they analyze an example of a development in American science and its application, such as eugenics, articulating the scientific concepts, the historical evidence for how society engaged the science, and how culture and science validated each other.
 
 
history, science
 
 
In each case study, students will read primary documents (scientific papers, proposals, correspondence) to identify the scientific concepts involved in the historical episode, and critically place that evidence within the historical context in which the knowledge or practice was produced. The synthesis is to articulate how science is produced and valued within the American cultural context and its historically contingent conditions.
Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
n/a
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
n/a
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
n/a
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
n/a
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
see Syllabus
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
see Syllabus
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
Field trip to NC Museum of History
Dr. Brinkman has a shared appointment with the NC Museum of Natural Sciences and NC State, and this course will be in his standard rotation of teaching load. No new resources from the Department are needed.

To strengthen scholarly, critical perspective on the distinctive developments and practices of science in America.


To strengthen ability to apply historical reasoning to present an interpretive stance on the question of “American science” as a useful historical category.


To strengthen ability to form a synthetic historical interpretation of the role that science and technology have played in the development of American culture.


To strengthen ability to apply appropriate evidence and reasoning to historical questions.


Student Learning Outcomes

1.Identify examples of how scientific objects and ideas are culturally embedded and have histories, as do the values we use to make sense of them;

2. Describe how scientific knowledge shapes cultural values, and how those values in turn condition our response to science;

3. Identify and appraise sophisticated arguments from historical and scientific perspectives;

4. Apply evidence in writing, not merely as an academic ex­ercise but in or­der to improve their general capacity to form valid arguments and to communicate them well;

5. Articulate complicated and contentious issues, which requires employing skills of precise speaking, careful listening, and respectful engagement.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Participation10see Syllabus
Written Assignment30see Syllabus
Multiple exams40see Syllabus
Final Exam20see Syllabus
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
see Syllabus

aeherget (Thu, 29 Mar 2018 19:36:02 GMT): AECHH: Friendly suggestions from March 28, 2018 UCCC meeting communicated and confirmed 3/29/2018 via email.
aeherget (Fri, 18 May 2018 12:39:02 GMT): AECHH: Uploading updated syllabus at faculty request 5/18/2018 based on pending adjustment to the disciplines on the April 6, 2018 CUE meeting.
Key: 24150