Viewing: PS 546 : The Politics of East Asia

Last approved: Tue, 06 Nov 2018 09:00:37 GMT

Last edit: Mon, 05 Nov 2018 15:42:29 GMT

Changes proposed by: cliao5
Change Type
Major
PS (Political Science)
546
032681
Dual-Level Course
No
Cross-listed Course
No
The Politics of East Asia
Politics East Asia
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Political Science (16PS)
45.1001
Political Science and Government, General.
Term Offering
Fall Only
Offered Every Year
Spring 2019
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded/Audit
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Seminar3
Course Attribute(s)


If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Jessica Liao
Assistant Professor
Graduate Faculty

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Seminar1010NoNone
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote


Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
No
This course examines the history and key theoretical and policy debates on the politics of East Asia, which in this course includes China, Japan, two Koreas, and Taiwan. Yet, other countries in and beyond the region (the United States, Russia, Southeast Asian nations) and their relations with the five states are an integral part of the course. The class comprises three parts. Part I introduces the modern history of East Asia. Part II examines the contemporary governments of East Asia, including their political systems and the main debates surrounding their politics. Part III focuses on interstate relations of East Asia and Pacific, comprising a series of topics that are both timely and heatedly debated among intellectuals and policymakers. While these topics are mostly country/countries-specific, they together are important in understanding the regional dynamics of East Asia.

The course is a part of the core course for the Master Program of International Studies and is frequently demanded by students.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
GEP Categories

Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 

 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 

 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 

 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 

Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 

 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

Faculty teaching assignments adjusted to allow for the teaching of the course.

This course has three objectives. It aims to teach students the key elements of contemporary East Asian politics as well as their historical context. Second, it aims to develop students’ critical thinking skills on a variety of issues related to the subject of East Asia. Finally, it aims to help students develop clear and efficient communication skills on the subject in both writing and verbal forms. By the end of the course, students should be familiar with major political issues in the East Asian region, the policies developed to deal with them and the processes that yield these policies in various political and social milieus.


Student Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students should be able to:


1. Identify and explain, both orally and in written form, the political issues in the East Asian region covered throughout the semester, the policies developed to deal with them, and the processes that yield these policies in various political and social milieus;

2. Critically analyze, both orally and in written form, these issues and the associated policy involvement; and;

3. Communicate in both verbal and written forms these issues and the associated policy development.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Participation20See syllabus.
Midterm20See syllabus.
Short Paper30Two in total. See syllabus
Major Paper30One final presentation and paper. See syllabus
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Course Introduction 3 hoursIntroduction
Origins of East Asian States: Historic Legacies 3 hoursLecture/Discussion
China and Japan: How One Party Stays in Power? 3 hoursLecture/Discussion
South Korea and Taiwan: How to Democratize (then Govern)?3 hoursLecture/Discussion
Economic Miracle and The Developmental State3 hoursLecture/Discussion
Strong States in Southeast Asia?3 hoursLecture/Discussion
Financial Crisis, Continuing Developmental State, and Rising Regionalism 3 hoursLecture/Discussion
Mid-term Exam in Class3 hoursMid-term exam
Regional Security Orders: A Theoretical Debate 3 hoursLecture/Discussion
Conflicts and Resolutions in East Asia3 hoursLecture/Discussion
Rising China: Status Quo or Revisionist Power?3 hoursLecture/Discussion
Japan’s Turn towards a ‘Normal’ Country?3 hoursLecture/Discussion
The United States in East Asia: Still Leading? 3 hoursLecture/Discussion
Thanksgiving Day- NO CLASSNoneNo class
ASEAN: Maintaining Regional Order (?)3 hoursLecture/Discussion
Final Paper Presentation and Wrap Up3 hoursPresentation/Discussion
mlnosbis 9/5/2018:
1) Effective date must be after Fall 2018
Everything else looks good!

cohen (9/6/2018):
I have two trivial suggestions. Otherwise the course looks great.
1. I would suggest using a longer abbreviated title.
2. In the first line in the paragraph on the participation grade, please fix the typos.

ABGS Reviewer Comments 10/10/2018:
-The CIM file says the course will be offered in Fall only but that action will be effective Spring 2019. However, the syllabus "Course and Grading Structure" section has due dates of February 27 and May 1st, but another place says "All write-ups should be submitted before the last class on December 5. Please edit for consistency.
-Has this course been taught before (it sounds like it is part of a Master's degree program)? It says "The course is a part of the core course for the Master Program of International Studies and is frequently demanded by students." If it has been offered before then that should be indicated in CIM. Also, if it is required for a program then should that be indicated in CIM.
bmcdona (Sun, 25 Feb 2018 23:04:03 GMT): Rollback: The syllabus needs to make sure it meets the CHASS syllabus checklist. Also, the information in CIMS isn't completely filled out. For instance, there are no course objectives and goals and course schedule has not been filled out. Everything should be as complete as possible or CHASS will just end up kicking it back anyways.
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