Viewing: PS 560 : Nuclear Nonproliferation Policy & Process

Last approved: Wed, 10 Oct 2018 08:00:38 GMT

Last edit: Tue, 09 Oct 2018 12:41:36 GMT

Changes proposed by: wboettch
Change Type
Major
PS (Political Science)
560
032672
Dual-Level Course
No
Cross-listed Course
No
Nuclear Nonproliferation Policy & Process
Nuclear Nonproliferation P&P
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Political Science (16PS)
45.1001
Political Science and Government, General.
Term Offering
Fall and Spring
Offered Alternate Years
Spring 2019
Previously taught as Special Topics?
Yes
2
 
Course Prefix/NumberSemester/Term OfferedEnrollment
PS 598 002Spring/201815
PS 598 001Spring/20178
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Letter Grade Only
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Seminar3
Course Attribute(s)


If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
William A. Boettcher III
Associate Professor
Graduate Faculty

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Seminar1515NoWill vary between 15 and 20
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote


Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16MISMRInternational Studies-MRElective
Policy and processes associated with global nuclear nonproliferation efforts. Special emphasis on the history of the development of the global nonproliferation regime, current challenges, and future threats.

This course was developed with funding from the Consortium for Nonproliferation Enabling Capabilities (CNEC). It serves as a specialization elective for Master of International Studies students and as an elective in the graduate certificate in Nuclear Nonproliferation Science & Policy. The course is interdisciplinary in character and includes students from nuclear engineering and mathematics.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
GEP Categories

Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 

 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 

 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 

 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 

Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 

 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

College(s)Contact NameStatement Summary
College of EngineeringDoug Reeves / John MattinglyCourses were discussed during initial planning; most students in the NNSP certificate program select this course; PS 560 does not duplicate any NE graduate course, and is complementary to NE541.
Course will be taught within regular load. No new resources required.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to nuclear nonproliferation policy and explore the processes by which states and multilateral institutions develop complex regimes to govern this technically complex problem area. It begins with short primers on nuclear technology and policy analysis to make the course more accessible to the expected interdisciplinary cohort of students. It then moves to a discussion of supply- and demand-side explanations for past nuclear proliferation, including both qualitative and quantitative studies. The following two sections of the course examine the history and current state of the international nonproliferation regime. The second half of the course considers the threat of non-state proliferation, evaluates current U.S. nonproliferation policy regarding Iran and the DPRK, highlights emerging issues related to technological innovation, considers the possibility of nuclear cooperation and restraint, and evaluates current efforts to reach “global zero.” The course concludes with an attempt to forecast future nonproliferation policy during the current presidential administration. By the end of the course, students should be familiar with proliferation threats, the policies developed to deal with them, and the sources of technical support that inform these policies in various political and cultural milieus.


Student Learning Outcomes

1. interpret and evaluate qualitative and quantitative evidence supporting explanations for nuclear proliferation;

2. analyze and distinguish between explanations and forecasting models at the demand side and supply side of nonproliferation policy;

3. identify and evaluate current and future threats to the nonproliferation regime;

4. analyze and critique scholarly arguments about nuclear restraint, arms control, and disarmament.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Participation15%seminar participation (rubric for grading on syllabus)
Short Paper18%There will be three short (5-7 page) analytical papers based on questions gleaned from the readings and class discussions. The questions will be distributed two weeks before each paper is due.
Short Paper18%There will be three short (5-7 page) analytical papers based on questions gleaned from the readings and class discussions. The questions will be distributed two weeks before each paper is due.
Short Paper19%There will be three short (5-7 page) analytical papers based on questions gleaned from the readings and class discussions. The questions will be distributed two weeks before each paper is due.
Major Paper30%Students will also be required to prepare one 15-20 page research paper. A detailed outline of this assignment will be distributed at the second class session.
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
N/AN/ASee attached syllabus and paper assignments.
mlnosbis 9/5/2018:
1) Effective date must be after Fall 2018
2) Clarify on syllabus whether readings will be posted to Moodle or that the student will need to get them from reserve at the library.

cohen (9/6/2018):
1. The grading is listed both as letter graded and S/U graded. According to Section B of Regulation 3.17, 500-level courses are letter graded. See:
https://grad.ncsu.edu/students/rules-and-regulations/handbook/3-17-grades/
(Note: we plan to have a university-wide discussion on whether or not to add the flexibility of S/U grading in 500-level courses.)
2. The course offering is on demand. That could make it hard for students to plan their course of study. Is it possible to commit to a regular schedule?
3. In the course objectives in CIM, there is a reference to one particular administration. In the syllabus the reference is to the more generic "current" presidential administration. I would suggest changing the language in CIM to that used in the syllabus.

ABGS Reviewer Comments 9/17/2018:
-No concerns
Key: 25526
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