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Viewing: FLG 315 : Germanic Civilization and Culture

Last approved: Wed, 01 Jun 2016 08:18:04 GMT

Last edit: Wed, 01 Jun 2016 08:18:04 GMT

Change Type
Major
FLG (Foreign Language - German)
315
009975
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Germanic Civilization and Culture
Ger Civ & Culture
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Foreign Languages & Literature (16FL)
Term Offering
Fall Only
Offered Alternate Even Years
Fall 2016
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Dr. Lutz Kube or Dr. James Brown
both: Teaching Assistant Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture2525NoN/A
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Prerequisite: FLG 202 or FLG 212 or placement at 300 level through the NC State placement exam
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16FLGBAGerman StudiesElective
16FLGINTGerman Studies and International EconomicsElective
16FLGSCIGerman Studies Science and TechnologyElective
16FLLGERForeign Languages and Literatures, German Studies ConcElective
16FLLGIEForeign Languages and Literatures, German Studies Intl Econ ConcElective
16FLLGSCIForeign Languages and Literatures, German Studies SCi Tech ConcElective
Culture and civilization of the German-speaking countries. Analysis of the social, economic and political structures of Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. Lectures, reports, conversation. Taught in German.

No revisions at this time.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Global Knowledge
Humanities
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Demonstrate fluency in major cultural and historical periods in German speaking lands and interpret them in their relevance for contemporary Germany, Austria, or Switzerland.
 
 
Short homework assignments, group discussion, writing assignments.
For example, students write a short essay on a painting that represents life in a specific cultural era such as "Biedermeier" (1815-1848).
 
 
Analyze varying interpretations of representatives of German history such as Frederick the Great and Otto von Bismarck and their contributions to the development of the German nation.
 
 
Short interpretive essays.
For example, students compare different interpretations of the achievements of Bismarck and must clearly express their own opinion.
 
 
Examine how the development of the German nation-state affected the everyday lives of ordinary Germans.
 
 
Oral reports.
Students must make an oral presentation of approximately 10 minutes on a representative figure of German, Austrian, or Swiss history and explain how this person affected the lives of the German, Austrian, or Swiss people. They create their arguments using a variety of print and online sources, from which they quote to support their reasoning.
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 
Examine and describe the historical development of German-speaking peoples, especially their values and attitudes in regard to the concept of nationhood as represented in cultural artifacts such as paintings, literature, and political pamphlets.
 
 
Short essays and exam questions.
For example, students will examine how Georg Büchner's political pamphlets shaped the view of social issues that influenced the development of the concept of the German nation.
 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 
Demonstrate fluency in explaining contemporary German politics and culture as a reflection of the country's history.
 
 
Final exam.
For example, students interpret the strong support for a socially engaged state as a reflection of Bismarck's social laws and the strength of the social democratic movement in Germany.
 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
N/A
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
N/A
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
FLG 202 or FLG 212 or placement into 300-level German.
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
Intermediate German skills.
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
Wulf Koepke, Die Deutschen (Fifth Edition)
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
Major topics include, but are not limited to: Enlightenment, Classicism and Romanticism, Otto von Bismarck, Reforms in Prussia, Industrialization and Social Problems, Berlin as a World City, Youth- and Women's Movements, World War I, November Revolution and the Weimar Republic, Hitler's Rise to Power, The Holocaust, The Beginning of the Cold War, and Reunification.

Please see the attached syllabus for a complete list of topics.
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
N/A
Both instructors usually have multi-year contracts for 4 courses per semester and teach this course as part of their regular rotation of courses.

Introduce students to major aspects of German society, culture, and history from ca. 1700 to the present.


Examine and evaluate the development of the German nation-state.


Examine and evaluate German society, culture, and history through a variety of primary-source cultural artifacts (e.g. visual art, literature, music, speeches, political pamphlets) as well as secondary sources (e.g. articles, interpretive essays, textbook materials).


Student Learning Outcomes

Students will be able to:

1. demonstrate fluency in major cultural and historical periods in the German-speaking lands from ca. 1700 to the present;

2. discuss and make informed evaluations, in German, of political, social, and cultural trends in the development of Germany, and to discern to what extent current events in Germany are shaped by the country's history.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Test4 at 10% eachTests will cover materials discussed in class and will include short essay questions as well as definitions of important concepts and cultural events.
Quizzes15% (together with Homework)Approximately 4 quizzes which cover reading assignments.
Homework15% (together with Quizzes)Daily homework assignments dealing with the reading assignments.
Oral Presentation15%Oral presentation of approximately 10 minutes on a seminal figure in German history or a cultural/political event vital to German society.
Participation10%Student participation evaluated based on preparedness, attentiveness, volunteering, and cooperation in group or partner activities
Final Exam20%Take-home final exam consisting of two major essays on topics and issues discussed throughout the semester
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Introduction; EnlightenmentWeek 1Class discussion, readings, group activities, short writing assignments.
German Bourgeoisie; Lessing; Frederick the GreatWeek 2Class discussion, readings, group activities, short writing assignments.
Goethe and Schiller; Classicism and RomanticismWeek 3Class discussion, readings, group activities, short writing assignments.
Napoleonic Era; Wars of Independence; Reforms in Prussia; TEST 1Week 4Class discussion, readings, group activities, short writing assignments.

Test 1
The Wartburgfest and Biedermeier Period; Eichendorff and Büchner; Industrialization and Social ProblemsWeek 5Class discussion, readings, group activities, short writing assignments.
Revolution of 1848; Otto von Bismarck; Berlin as a World CityWeek 6Class discussion, readings, group activities, short writing assignments.
Youth- and Women's Movements; The Modern Period; World War IWeek 7Class discussion, readings, group activities, short writing assignments.
Review; TEST 2Week 8Test 2
November Revolution and the Weimar Republic; Inflation; 1920s CultureWeek 9Class discussion, readings, group activities, short writing assignments.
End of the Republic; Hitler's Rise to Power; DictatorshipWeek 10Class discussion, readings, group activities, short writing assignments.
The Holocaust; Germany's Guilt; TEST 3Week 11Class discussion, readings, group activities, short writing assignments.

Test 3
"Zero Hour"; Beginning of the Cold War; Wirtschaftswunder: Germany's Economic MiracleWeek 12Class discussion, readings, group activities, short writing assignments.
The GDR and the Berlin Wall; The 1968 Student Movement; Collapse of the GDRWeek 13Class discussion, readings, group activities, short writing assignments.
Reunification; TEST 4Week 14Class discussion, readings, group activities, short writing assignments.

Test 4
Student presentationsWeek 15Student presentations and class discussion
Student presentationsWeek 16Student presentations and class discussion

Key: 2591