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Viewing: FLG 323 : Twentieth Century German Literature

Last approved: Sat, 21 Apr 2018 08:00:38 GMT

Last edit: Tue, 03 Apr 2018 20:48:18 GMT

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Major
FLG (Foreign Language - German)
323
009979
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Twentieth Century German Literature
Twentieth Century German Lit
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Foreign Languages & Literature (16FL)
Term Offering
Spring Only
Offered Alternate Years
Spring 2019
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Ruth Gross
Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture1515NoMajors, minors, interested students.
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Prerequisite: FLG 202 or FLG 212 or equivalent.

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16FLGBAGerman StudiesElective
16FLGINTGerman Studies and International EconomicsElective
16FLGSCIGerman Studies and TechnologyElective
16FLLGERForeign Languages and Literatures, German Studies ConcElective
16FLLGIEForeign Languages and Literatures, German STudies Intl Econ ConcElective
16FLLGSCIForeign Languages and Literatures, German STudies Intl Econ ConcElective
Twentieth century literature from German-speaking countries. Readings of Mann, Kafka, Rilke, Hesse, Durrenmatt, Frisch, Grass, and a variety of poets, or concentration on one or two of these world authors. Lectures and discussions. Oral and written assignments.

GEP review for HUM; GK reviewed and approved 8/2012.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Global Knowledge
Humanities
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Analyze literary texts by authors of the 20th century and explain how they reflect the cultural and historical developments of the age.
 
 
Midterm and Final Exams.
Question from Exam: Write a conversation of about 500 words between two characters that appear in two separate texts we have read during the semester. The situation is the following: these two characters happen to meet in Sigmund Freud's waiting room and they relate to each other why they are seeking Freud's psychoanalytic help.
 
 
Apply the methods of literary analysis and discuss, in speaking and writing in German, various interpretations of a given text.
 
 
Worksheets given out on specific texts.
Example from a work sheet on Kafka's "Give it up": Kafka's text has been read through historical, biographical, and psychological lenses, just to name a few. Knowing what you do of Kafka's life and the period, try to come up with a reading for this text from each of these perspectives.
 
 
Organize and write essays of literary criticism, supporting arguments with appropriate quotations from the primary texts and secondary sources.
 
 
Formal writing assignments that relate to the different texts.
Sample prompt: Kafka's life is often used as the basis for interpreting his works. On the basis of one of the texts we have read this semester, discuss both the strengths and weaknesses of using this biographical method. Give specific examples to support your argument.
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 
Examine and describe how these literary works of the 20th century reflect and contest ideas and values from a specific historical context in German-speaking countries.
 
 
Writing assignments dealing with the works studied.
Sample Prompt: How does Thomas Mann's "Death in Venice" illustrate elements of aesthetic decadence , so prevalent in turn-of-the-century literature? Provide specific examples from the text and explain their relevance to the term.
 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 
Analyze what is meant by the term "modernism" and particularly its examples in German-speaking and broader--European society.
 
 
Final Exam.
Sample question: Compare the idea of modernism as it is illustrated in Kafka's "Metamorphosis" and in Thomas Mann's "Death in Venice."
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
NA
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
NA
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
FLG 202 or FLG212 or placement at 300 level.
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
High intermediate knowledge of German.
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
Franz Kafka, "Selected Stories"
Franz Kafka, "Metamorphosis"
Franz Kafka,"A Hunger Artist"
Franz Kafka, "The Trial"
Thomas Mann, "Selected Stories"
Thomas Mann, "Tonio Kroeger"
Thomas Mann, "Death in Venice"
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
The Kafkaesque, Modernism, Decadence, Fin-de Siecle ambiance.
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
None
Tenured faculty member teaches this course as part of her regular teaching obligations.

1. Understand and engage in the human experience through the interpretation of literature; and


2. become aware of the act of interpretation itself as a critical form of knowing in the study of literature; and


3. make scholarly arguments about literary works using reasons and ways of supporting those reasons that are appropriate to the field of study.


Student Learning Outcomes

1. analyze literary texts of the 20th century and explain how they reflect the society and age in which they are written.

2. apply the methods of literary analysis and discuss, in speaking and writing German, various interpretations of these works.

3. organize and write in German dialogues and essays that support arguments with appropriate quotations from the primary texts and secondary sources.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Midterm15%Questions and identifications.
Written Assignment15%Journals and Response Papers
Essay30%Formal Assignments--sometimes letter, sometimes essays.
Project15%Group project--a video of a Kafka story created by the group.
Participation10%Active participation in discussion.
Final Exam15%Questions on final novel.
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Modernism2 classesLecture, discussion
Kafka and his works20 classesLectures, discussions, worksheets, films
Thomas Mann and his works8 classesLectures, discussions, worksheets, films

despain (Thu, 08 Sep 2016 14:16:44 GMT): Rollback: Per request from Dudley.
n51ls801 (Tue, 06 Mar 2018 01:12:55 GMT): Given the course description's qualification, "or concentration on one or two of these world authors," it is helpfully illustrative to have the CIM form reflect a focus on two authors (Mann and Kafka) while the sample syllabus focuses on one author (Kafka).
aeherget (Tue, 03 Apr 2018 20:48:18 GMT): AECHH: Uploading updated syllabus based on friendly suggestions from March 28, 2018 UCCC meeting at faculty request via email 4/3/2018.
Key: 2594