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Viewing: FOR 260 : Forest Ecology

Last approved: Tue, 15 Mar 2016 17:50:33 GMT

Last edit: Tue, 15 Mar 2016 17:50:28 GMT

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FOR (Forestry)
260
010234
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Forest Ecology
Forest Ecology
College of Natural Resources
Forestry (15FOR)
Term Offering
Spring Only
Offered Every Year
Spring 2016
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Letter Grade Only
4
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Laboratory3.0
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)


If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Theodore Shear
Associate Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture4040No
Laboratory4040No
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
15FORMTBSForest ManagementRequired
15NATREECONatural Resources Ecosystem AssessmentElective
15NATREPOLNatural Resources Policy and AdministrationElective
17BIOSCBSBiological SciencesElective
Introduction to forest ecosystems, their structure and functions, and the processes that regulate them including: radiation, temperature, water, and biogeochemistry; productivity; plant populations; forest communities; succession; natural disturbances; and human influences. Must have a strong love of trees.

The desire is to make this course an equivalent of the PB 360 and BIO 360 courses currently required in the natural resources curricula and additionally to enhance coverage of topics for the forestry students who have been and still will be required to take this course. The instructor has long advocated for additional time to present the material and engage the students in better learning techniques than could be accommodated in the twice weekly meetings. The strength of the lab experience in this course has been undercut by limits on presentation of context and time for hands on application in the classroom. 


No

Is this a GEP Course?
No
GEP Categories

Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 

 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 

 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 

 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 

Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 

 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

This is an expansion of the teaching load of Dr. Shear. No new resources are required. Existing resources required are class room space, the Schenck Forest for laboratory exercises, and bus transporation to the lab sessions provided by Motor Pool.

The primary goal is to learn the basic principles of ecology and their use in analyzing forest plant communities. Emphasis is on production and chemical cycling at the ecosystem level.  This is accomplished through lectures and independent readings.


The practical component of this course is a series of laboratories selected to accomplish two primary goals. One is to introduce some of the methodologies of modern ecology and the other is to illustrate basic ecological principles. Students will come to look at the natural world from different perspectives common in ecology, and consider the importance of spatial and temporal scales. They will gain hands-on experience with field techniques for gathering data, analyzing results, and interpreting the ecological meaning of the results. They will will improve their skills at articulate ideas, hypotheses, research protocols, analyses and conclusions, and opinions relevant to science and especially ecology.


Student Learning Outcomes

With this course, students will come to:



  1. Use fundamental ecological concepts and principles including: the structure and function of ecosystems, plant and animal communities, soil properties and processes, hydrology, watershed functions, nutrient cycling, water quality, competition, diversity, population dynamics, succession, and disturbance.

  2. Interpret and explain the components, patterns, and processes of biological and ecological systems across spatial and temporal scales.

  3. Demonstrate how concepts conservation biology influence forest management and biodiversity.

  4. Gain hands-on experience with field techniques for gathering data, analyzing results, and interpreting the ecological meaning of the results.

  5. Improve skills for articulating ideas, hypotheses, research protocols, analyses and conclusions, and opinions relevant to science and especially ecology.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Quizzes20%10 quizzes evenly spaced throughout the semester.
Midterm25%Cumulative.
Lab Report30%Due at the completion of each exercise, for about 12 submissions.
Final Exam25%Cumulative.
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Introduction; What is Ecology?5%Lecture
Ecological Role of Solar Radiation5%Lecture
Temperature as an Ecological Factor 5%Lecture
Water: The Material that Makes Life Possible 5%Lecture
Forest Soils5%Lecture
Biogeochemistry: Cycling of Nutrients in Ecosystems10%Lecture
Production Ecology: The Transfer and Storage of Energy in Ecosystems10%Lecture
Population Ecology: Study of the Abundance and Dynamics of Species15%Lecture
Patterns of Biotic Communities Across Environmental Gradients 10%Lecture
Community Ecology 10%Lecture
Ecological Succession: Processes of Change in Ecosystems5%Lecture
Fire: A Pervasive and Powerful Environmental Factor 5%Lecture
Wind: Ecological Effects of Atmospheric Movement5%Lecture
Desertification5%Lecture
Forest structure - Species and form10%Lab
Forest Structure – Down Woody Debris 10%Lab
Forest Structure - Below-ground Structure / Roots10%Lab
Seed and Seedling Banks10%Lab
Microtopography 10%Lab
Community Classification 10%Lab
Density Dependent Competition10%Lab
Community Diversity 10%Lab
Canopy Analysis10%Lab
Presentation of findings10%Lab

yplee (Wed, 27 Jan 2016 22:04:36 GMT): Rollback: Please make the changes that were discussed at our college committee meeting and send back through the workflow.
Key: 2676