Preview Workflow

Viewing: PSY 495 : Community-Based Applied Psychology

Last approved: Sat, 11 Apr 2015 09:21:12 GMT

Last edit: Thu, 02 Apr 2015 19:00:07 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
PSY (Psychology)
495
018601
Dual-Level Course
No
Cross-listed Course
No
Community-Based Applied Psychology
Community-Based Applied Psych
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Psychology (16PSY)
Term Offering
Fall and Spring
Offered Every Year
Summer 1 2015
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
4
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Field Work2.0
Seminar3.0
Course Attribute(s)
SVL (Service Lrng)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
Yes
2
 
 
8
John Begeny
Associate Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture2525Yesn/a
Field Work2525Yesn/a
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Prerequisite: PSY 200 and PSY 230
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16PSYCHBAPsychologyElective
16PSYCHMPsychology MinorElective
Service learning course that covers one or more areas of psychological practice, including relevant research methods, community engagement principles and practices, and ethical issues. Includes learning about psychological practice in at least one of the following settings: health, education, work settings, law, sports, community-based setting, consumer markets, and/or cross-cultural settings. Explores professional roles and contributions in the contexts of social, education, organizational and/or technological change. $15 liability insurance fee required.

The Psychology undergraduate curriculum needs a course that provides appropriate faculty supervision and guidance to students who are participating in service learning and practicum experiences.  The old version of PSY 495 was limited to the needs and restrictions of the Applied Psychology Option that the Psychology Department discontinued in 2011.


Therefore, in addition to changing the grading format from SUS to ABCDF, we are proposing that the scope of the course be increased so that multiple instructors who are interested in supervising students in service learning/practicum situations can use it as a general practicum course. We propose that PSY 495 be a shell course for service learning opportunities within a wide range of disciplines in psychology including school, community, forensic, industrial, and developmental psychology.


We propose modification of the course catalog description in order to specify that this is a service learning course. This will not only assist with current and ongoing initiatives within NCSU for identifying service learning courses offered in the NCSU undergraduate curriculum, but will also make it clear to students enrolling in the course that service learning and the application of psychological knowledge and principles is a key component of the course.


To achieve the above mentioned purposes, the following revisions are proposed:


Content- Make the course applicable to a broad range of students in the General Psychology option. We describe the course content broadly so that the course can be a shell course for other service learning/practicum opportunities within various specialties of psychology (forensic, school, volunteer and work settings).


Title- Change from "Human Resource Development Practicum" to "Community-based Applied Psychology''


Abbreviated Title- Change from "Hum Res Dev Pract" to "Community-based Applied Psych.


Credit Hours- Change from variable 1-8 hours, to 3 credit hours consistent with the new format of the course.


Grading Method -Change in grading format from S/U to ABCDF. The S/U format served the Applied Psychology option sufficiently, but the proposed revisions will allow students to be involved with a number of both classroom and applied tasks for which a specific letter grade can and should be determined.


Prerequisite/Co-requisite- Change prerequisites from HRD Majors and Junior Standing, to PSY 200, PSY 230


Increase the enrollment capacity of the course. Increasing enrollment capacity is important because: (a) a larger numbers of students will have the opportunity to acquire supervised service learning and practicum experience within the 16PSYCHBA curriculum, (b) there are currently no other service learning courses in the PSY curriculum, and (c) research in higher education and college teaching highlights the major advantages of engaging students in their community and obtaining service learning experiences. We therefore want to enroll the highest number of students possible while maintaining a quality service learning/practicum experience for all students enrolled.


Modification of the course catalog description to specify that this is a service learning course. This not only assists with current and ongoing initiatives within NCSU for identifying service learning courses offered within the NCSU undergraduate curriculum, but also makes it clear to students enrolling in the course that service learning is a key component of the course. Students' awareness of the service learning component is important as part of their course selection and preparation.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
No
GEP Categories

Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 

 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 

 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 

 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 

Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 

 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

No new resources will be required as this course will be offered to consolidate the efforts of existing faculty who are capable of teaching this course. Regarding the service learning component, the faculty teaching this course have already built numerous relationships with community partners (e.g., YMCA and Boys and Girls Club after school programs) and no additional resources would be needed to involve NCSU undergraduate students in community-based service learning.

Student Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, students should be able to:


1. Describe and verbally discuss the basic terms and fundamental research findings (and study strengths and limitations) related to one or more areas of community-based applied psychology.


2. Describe and think critically about (in writing and class discussions) the research methods that are used within one or more areas of community-based applied psychology.


3. With high levels of accuracy, students will apply strategies, concepts, and principles related to one or more areas of applied psychology in a community-based context.


4. Demonstrate in writing and discussions meaningful reflection about the content, strategies, concepts, and applied work that is experienced during the course, and how they intersect with one another.


5. Demonstrate in writing and discussions how the content, strategies, concepts, and applied work that are learned during the course can be applied to other contexts and applied settings.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Other66.6% (200 of 300 total points)Applied Performance and Participation
1. Initial (first-day) implementation of intervention strategies at your applied site with a student (40 points) Points are awarded according to students' percentage of steps implemented correctly. The specific grading rubric will be provided in class.
2. Overall implementation of intervention strategies throughout the semester (20 points) Points are awarded according to students' percentage of steps implemented correctly. The specific grading rubric will be provided in class.
3. Mock administration of the two assessment protocols that Participation points) you will learn (20 points) Points are awarded according to students' percentage of steps implemented correctly. The specific grading rubric will be provided in class.
4. Presentation on an area of applied psychology during class (20 points) Points are awarded according to a specific presentation scoring grid provided in class.
5. Performance on the key concepts and principles quiz/test (25 points) Points are awarded according to number of items answered correctly.
6. Selecting an assignment for the class and leading a productive discussion of that assignment (25 points). Points are awarded according to a specific scoring grid provided in class.
7. Overall participation during class discussions, such as making comments and asking questions (15 points) To earn all points, it is expected that students are actively participating (making a comment or asking a question) in at least 80% of all class periods.
8. Overall preparation, engagement, timeliness, and professionalism at your applied site (20 points) More than 4 reports from the applied site supervisor regarding concerns (e.g., showing up late, using phone for personal reasons when supposed to be engaged with students, using inappropriate language) would be considered at least a "C" level of preparation/professionalism (with additional concerns resulting in even fewer points earned). With any report of concern, the supervisor and instructor will talk with the student to explain and try to remedy the concern.
9. Overall attendance and timeliness for class meetings (15 points) An unexcused absence (e.g., not showing up for a scheduled event and neglecting to make a good attempt to notify me) will result in a loss of points from your participation grade. Points will be deducted as follows: the first unexcused absence results in loss of 4 points; a second unexcused absence results in loss of 5 points, a third results in a loss of 6 points, and so forth. For instance, if you miss 2 class meetings and 1 applied activity, all unexcused, you would lose 15 points total.

Also related to attendance and potentially losing points:
Each time you arrive late or leave early = loss of 1 point (10 min or less) or 2 points (10-25 min) or 3 points (25 min or more).

You are allowed one excused absence (i.e., a valid, documented reason for missing a class or applied activity) with no penalty to your grade. Up to 2 additional excused absences can be petitioned to be "made up," but it is the student's responsibility to ensure proper timing and communication about making up an excused absence. For example, if you have an excused absence, you should inquire about making up that absence within a week following the absence, After 3 excused absences, points may be deducted from your grade, but this will be negotiated with me based on the student's specific circumstances.

If you must be absent for a scheduled event, it is your responsibility to contact me and your on-site supervisor, as well as make efforts to find a replacement for you if you must be absent from an applied activity. If you must be absent from a class meeting, it is your responsibility to contact me as much in advance as possible.
Written Assignment33.3% (100 of 300 total points)Writing Assignment
Each written question you pose for a given reading will be scored on a 5-point scale according to the quality and relevancy of your question. The scale is as follows: 1 =Very Poor; 3 =Average; 5 = Very Strong. The average score of each question will be your overall Question (Q) Score for that specific assignment. For example, if a given assignment asks you to read three articles and write a question for each article, you will receive a score (0- 5) for each question (i.e., three separate scores). Then, the average of those three scores will constitute your overall Q Score for that assignment. During class I will discuss what is meant by a very strong question and provide you with examples of questions that would receive scores on the 1-5 scale. In general, a very strong and relevant question is one that demonstrates: (a) deep reflection and critical thinking, (b) an ability to integrate knowledge learned from different sources or contexts, (c) your ability to clearly write your question with appropriate context, and/or (d) strong conceptual knowledge of material that you read or experiences that you obtained.

Writing Comments
Based on my past experience with this type of task, each of your points) written comments of a specific reading will generally be evaluated as very good and thoughtful. In this way, you wi ll not specifically receive points for your comments. However, if a comment well exceeds being "very good and thoughtful," I may add a "bonus" point to your Q score. If a comment is clearly underdeveloped, I may deduct a point from your Q score. Additional information about thoughtful comments will be discussed in class.

Writing Clearly and with Concision
For each writing assignment, you will receive an overall score for the clarity and concision of your comments and questions. This Clarity and Concision (CC) Score will also be scored on 5-point scale, using the same rubric stated above. The purpose of the CC score will be for you to get ongoing feedback about the clarity and concision of your writing. Writing clearly and succinctly is important for your overall professional development, and I emphasize this in this particular class because I find that most students benefit from receiving more feedback about their writing. Students will know the exact number of points they earn for all Q and CC writing scores because the points will be stated by the instructor on the bottom of the student's paper once scoring is complete (e.g., it will show "CC= X and Q =X").

Collectively, each writing assignment will result in the opportunity to earn up to 10 total points.
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Week 11 weekIn class
Overview of class, syllabus, and expectations;
introductions; course logistics; select chapter for student presentations

Assignment before arriving to next class
Read syllabus carefully; get head start on upcoming readings.
Week 21 weekIn class
Brief syllabus quiz; Presentation about applied psych
and community engaged scholarship. Organize schedules.

Assignment before arriving to next class
Read Carpintero (2004) and Jameson et al. (2010); prepare written response based on both readings.
Week 31 weekIn class
Discuss the two assigned readings; Discuss
expectations for student presentations.

Assignment before arriving to next class
One reading about a specific Applied Psych area (per student selection); prepare for student presentations on the selected area.No written response due.
Week 41 weekIn class
Students take quiz; John presents on applied psych in education and provides overview of related research (e.g., HELPS) and community engagement work; Discuss the feedback you received on your written responses; choose student led assignments; discuss logistics for applied work.

Assignment before arriving to next class
Read HPTM Chapters 3-5; do all training activities to learn HELPS Program implementation. No written response due.
Week 51 weekIn class
HELPS Training Workshops and mock administration of the two reading assessments in class.

Assignment before arriving to next class
Read Begeny eta!. (2011), Chapter 8 of HPTM, and all "The Problem" pages from Helps Education Fund website (as stated in class); prepare written responses based on the three readings.
Week 61 weekIn class
John gives overview of Helps Education Fund as an
example of applied psych in education, community
psych, and educational equity; class discussion of
readings.

Assignment before arriving to next class
Read Begeny, Braun et al. (2012), Begeny, Ross et al., (2012), and Boyer (1996); prepare written responses based on the three readings
Week 71 weekIn class
Discuss readings from previous week.

Assignment before arriving to next class
Read Begeny & Martens (2006) and Labaree (1996).

Extra credit option (10 points): write a ]-page reflection and commentary specific to your applied experiences (details given in class)
Week 81 weekIn class
Discuss readings from previous week.

Assignment before arriving to next class
Student led assignment# I
Week 91 weekIn class


Assignment before arriving to next class
Week 101 weekIn class
Discuss SLA # I.

Assignment before arriving to next class
Watch films (TBA); prep written response about each film . Specifically, find at least one media report about each of the two films and prepare written responses about the films and the reports you identified.
Week 111 weekIn class
Discuss films.

Assignment before arriving to next class
Student led assignment #2
Week 121 weekIn class
Discuss SLA #2.

Assignment before arriving to next class
Student led assignment #3.
Week 131 weekIn class
Discuss SLA #3.

Assignment before arriving to next class
Student led assignment #4.
Week 141 weekIn class
Discuss SLA #4.

Assignment before arriving to next class
Student led assignment #5.
Week 151 weekIn class
Discuss SLA #5.

Assignment before arriving to next class
Student led assignment #6
Week 161 weekIn class
Discuss SLA #6.

Assignment before arriving to next class
Work on final paper (due date will be provided in class).
This course was approved pending by UCCC 11.5.2015.Revisions were reviewed and approved. Because portions were approved as the old CAF, this form was filled out by OUCC, with syllabus, CAF, and consults attached. Approval memos sent via email to Registration & Records and college liaisons.

GMN 3.9.2015
Key: 2728