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Viewing: FS 201 : Introduction to Food Science

Last approved: Tue, 03 Oct 2017 14:13:04 GMT

Last edit: Tue, 03 Oct 2017 14:13:04 GMT

Change Type
Major
FS (Food Science)
201
010630
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Introduction to Food Science
Intro to Food Science
College of Agriculture and Life Sciences
Food Bioprocessing and Nutrition (11FS)
Term Offering
Fall, Spring and Summer
Offered Every Year
Spring 2017
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)
Distance Education (DELTA)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Dr. G. Keith Harris
Associate Professor and Undergraduate Coordinator of Food Science

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture9595NoCourse is taught face-to-face in the Fall and Spring.
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Delivery FormatPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
LEC100100NoCourse is taught online in Fall, Spring, and Summer I semesters.

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
11 FOODSBSFood ScienceRequired
11 NTSBSNutrition ScienceRequired
11 NTSANApplied NutritionRequired
Food science is an exciting, multidisciplinary career that draws on chemistry, microbiology, and engineering principles to produce, preserve, and protect the foods that we eat every day. This course is designed to help you understand the journey of foods from "farm to fork", the effect of diet on human health, and the laws governing food labeling and marketing. It's science you can eat!

Course already approved.  We are revising the course description to more closely reflect the content taught during the semester.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Natural Sciences
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Discuss chemical, microbiological, and engineering principles inherent to food preservation and processing.
 
 
Students completed weekly quizzes and discussions. The quizzes consist primarily of short answer and multiple choice questions. Quizzes also include one essay question to assess student abilities in written assignments. Quiz materials are cumulative, such that they are designed to assess the growing body of microbiological, chemical, and engineering-related food science knowledge students are expected to gain over the course of a semester. Discussions engage students in current interest and/or controversial topics related to food science and related disciplines. Questions for quizzes map back to course-level and program level outcomes. The also reflect the IFT (Institute of Food Technologists) core competencies for undergraduate food science programs.

Examples:

Quiz Question. Bacteria multiply very quickly. The time it takes them to double their population is call (wait for it) DOUBLING TIME. If a type of bacteria has a doubling time of 18 minutes, how many will be present after 2 hours if you start with 10?
a. 1,000,000
b. 640
c. 160
d. 320

Essay Question. Imagine you are preparing for a week long hiking trip in the Grand Canyon. No refrigeration will be available during the trip and you must take enough food to sustain yourself for the whole time. List five food items you would pack in your bag, and explain why you would take these with you. (In your explanation, make sure to consider factors such as safety, convenience, food form and nutrition.) One of your friends (not a food scientist) suggests bringing enough lunch meat along to have for lunch every day. Clearly explain why this is a BAD idea from a chemical and microbiological perspective.

Discussion Question. Called "Mechanically Separated Meat Trimmings" by its producers and "Pink Slime" by its detractors, this product was made from ground meat scraps that were treated with ammonium hydroxide in order to get rid of pathogens. The results was a material that was, until recently, mixed into hamburger and other meat products for large corporations, like McDonald's. The controversy over "Pink Slime" resulted in an 80% loss of business, the closing of 3 out of 4 plants that produced it and the loss of 700 jobs for BPI employees. Now, BPI is striking back with a lawsuit against ABC News, the network that first aired the "Pink Slime" stories. So, what is your perspective?

-Was "Mechanically Separated Meat Trimmings" a good idea because it can make more efficient (less waste) and microbially safe use of meat products or was it bad because it is treated chemically and looks something like strawberry soft serve?

-Who is the better "convincer", Jamie Oliver or the scientists? Why?

-Was ABC News correct in reporting negatively on this company's products?

-How strong do you think BPI's case is against ABC News?

-Regardless of your perspective, make sure to consider the opposite perspective in your discussion and how you feel about the company bankruptcy and resulting loss of jobs.


 
 
Explain how water, proteins, fats, carbohydrates and other ingredients interact in food systems.
 
 
Students completed weekly quizzes and discussions. The quizzes consist primarily of short answer and multiple choice questions. Quizzes also include one essay question to assess student abilities in written assignments. Quiz materials are cumulative, such that they are designed to assess the growing body of microbiological, chemical, and engineering-related food science knowledge students are expected to gain over the course of a semester. Discussions engage students in current interest and/or controversial topics related to food science and related disciplines. Questions for quizzes map back to course-level and program level outcomes. The also reflect the IFT (Institute of Food Technologists) core competencies for undergraduate food science programs.

Examples:

Quiz Question 1. In candy-making operations, it is common to mix two sugars together and heat them. When this mixture is cooled, the result is a material that is very disorganized on the molecular level and very brittle. Its physical form is one that can also effectively trap flavor compounds in food products like Jolly Ranchers. This material is a food-based ____________?

Quiz Question 2.

It's March 14th, Pi Day, the celebration of the value 3.14 (the ratio of a circle's circumference to its diameter). To celebrate, you decide to bake an apple pie. Here is a basic apple pie recipe:

Crust
Flour
Sugar
Salt
Butter
Water

Filling
Sliced Apples
Butter
Sugar
Corn Starch
Lemon Juice

Since you wish to eliminate a few calories from the recipe, you substitute Stevia (a calorie-free, non-carbohydrate sweetener that is 150 times as sweet as sugar) for sugar in both the crust and the filling. To be more specific you make a 1 to 1 substitution. That is, if the recipe calls for 1 teaspoon of sugar, you add 1 teaspoon of Stevia. What might change about your final product? Choose all that apply.

a. The crust would become too brown.
b. Maillard Browning would not occur.
c. The filling would be too thick or viscous.
d. The filling would be too thin or runny.
e. The water activity of the pie would be higher than expected.
f. The water activity of the pie would be very low.
g. The pie would be too sweet.
h. The pie would not be very sweet.
Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
74% (face-to-face only)
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
A total of 25 out of 95 seats in the face-to-face section of the course are reserved for freshmen and sophomores in Nutrition Science and Applied Nutrition majors.
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
Yes.
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
None.
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
None.
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
None.
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
See attached syllabus.
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
None.
College(s)Contact NameStatement Summary
College of Agriculture and Life SciencesDr. G. Keith Harris
This course uses classroom space in Schaub Hall, Mediasite lecture capture software, mp3 voice recording, Top Hat student response software, Moodle as an LMS, and when required by student needs, captioning or note-taking accommodations.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:



  1. Describe the diversity of career opportunities available to you in the food industry.

  2. Explain how food product marketing and sensory characteristics affect consumer choice.

  3. Explain how water, proteins, fats, carbohydrates and other ingredients interact in food systems. 

  4. Discuss chemical, microbiological, and engineering principles inherent to food preservation and processing.

  5. Interpret the effects of government regulation on food labeling and food industry marketing.

  6. Compare the global food market with the US market.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Quizzes25Quizzes consist of short answer, multiple choice and matching questions that map back to student learning outcomes, as well as to program-level, and IFT core competencies for undergraduates. Quizzes are cumulative and are designed to build student knowledge week by week. Course questions are also adapted to the seasons. Unique questions are asked in Spring vs Summer vs Fall in order to make the course as relatable as possible to students' experiences. Target Bloom's Taxonomy levels for these questions are remembering and understanding.
Essay25Short essays are required each week. Students are asked to consider a topic related to a particular week's lessons and compose a short essay about it. The purpose of the essays is to get students to think at higher levels of Bloom's Taxonomy (applying and analyzing) relative to general quiz questions.
Discussion20Weekly class discussions probe students abilities to write about current and or controversial topics related to food science and related disciplines. Target Bloom's Taxonomy levels for these questions are analyzing and (occasionally) evaluating.
Final Exam30The cumulative final exam seeks to integrate the broad range of food science topics from across the entire semester.
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
See attached syllabus.

aeherget (Mon, 14 Aug 2017 16:54:33 GMT): AECHH: Uploading updated request at instructor's request via email 8/11/2017.
aeherget (Fri, 22 Sep 2017 16:03:45 GMT): AECHH: Uploading updated syllabus and adding "It's science you can eat!" to description at instructor's request through the liaison via email 9/22/2017.
aeherget (Fri, 22 Sep 2017 16:06:28 GMT): AECHH: CUE approved GEP information on Sept. 1, 2017. UCCC pending items provided 9/22/2017 from the Aug. 23, 2017 UCCC meeting.
Key: 2796