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Viewing: ANT 252 : Cultural Anthropology

Last approved: Tue, 13 Dec 2016 09:01:21 GMT

Last edit: Tue, 13 Dec 2016 09:01:21 GMT

Change Type
Major
ANT (Anthropology)
252
000731
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Cultural Anthropology
Cultural Anthropol
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Sociology (16SOC)
Term Offering
Fall, Spring and Summer
Offered Every Year
Fall 2016
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)
Distance Education (DELTA)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Sasha (Alexander) Newell
Assistant Professsor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture400-45075YesN/A
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Delivery FormatPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
LEC8080NoN/A

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16ANTBAAnthropology MajorRequired
16AYMAnthropology MinorRequired
16INTSTBAInternational Studies MajorElective
Comparative study of contemporary human culture, social institutions and processes that influence behavior. The range of human cultural variation shown throughout the world, including the student's own cultural system.

Formal GEP social science review. Course was previously approved for Global Knowledge.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Global Knowledge
Social Sciences
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Identify and describe key theories and concepts in cultural anthropology.
 
 
Students are regularly engaged in classroom discussion and regular informal in-class writing assignments, in which they learn a lot about how well they understand the various cultures, societies and other social phenomena we are learning about. In addition, I rely on midterm and final exams breadth and depth of student knowledge in this domain. A sample set of exam questions follows.

Answer 2 of the following questions concisely in approximately 200 words. Each question is worth 10 points.

1. What can intersex babies in the U.S. tell us about the relationship between culture and sexual categories?

2. Describe the concept of liminality in relation to Ndembu rites of passage.

3. How is it possible that the Azande can understand the scientific causality behind the collapse of a granary and yet still explain its fall in terms of witchcraft?

4. According to Jane Hill, how and what does one’s speech communicate through indexicality?
 
 
Employ and critically assess key anthropological research methods.
 
 
Students are asked to perform a mini-ethnography in which they engage in participant observation and write up the experience in relationship to the issues we had discussed. They must spend at least one hour in the engagement, they must take fieldnotes, and they must reflect upon the kinds of knowledge they gained as an ethnographer and the relationship between subjectivity and objectivity in their observations.
 
 
Apply the anthropological perspective to interpretations of their own social lives, and of other peoples and cultures they encounter or read about.
 
 
Students are regularly engaged in classroom discussion and informal in-class writing assignments, in which I often ask them to apply the theories to concrete situations as well as modelling this kind of practice in my own examples. In addition, I rely on midterm and final exams breadth and depth of student capacity to apply these concepts to ethnographic material A sample exam question follows.

Write 500-750 words on the following prompt:

1. From an anthropological perspective, what is the social difference between economic exchanges carried out through gifts and those carried out through money? Using at least three ethnographic examples, explain the significance of reciprocity for understanding how sociality is formed.
Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 
Employ specific ethnographic examples from around the world to consider diverse cultural perspectives on anthropological themes.
 
 
Students are regularly engaged in classroom discussion and informal in-class writing assignments, in which I often ask them to apply the theories to concrete situations as well as modelling this kind of practice in my own examples. In addition, I rely on midterm and final exams to evaluated the breadth and depth of student capacity to apply these concepts to ethnographic material. Sample exam questions follow:

C2. Using the famous granary example, explain how Azande witchcraft beliefs can be compatible with a scientific understanding of causality.

C3. Describe the roles of owners and workers at a Trobriand Funeral
 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 
* Compare specific social and cultural characteristics across social groups, including non-U.S. societies
 
 
sample exam essay question:

D2. In U.S. society, we believe that gender behavior is a natural expression of our biological sex. However, the Wodaabe, the Hua, the Baruya, and the Brazilian Travestis each construct these categories differently. Compare and contrast using at least 3 of these examples to denaturalize U.S. gender patterns.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
N/A
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
N/A
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
none
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
none
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
Eric Gable. 2010. Anthropology and Egalitarianism: Ethnographic Encounters from Monticello to Guinea-Bissau. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press. ISBN: 978025322756
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

Part of regular teaching load. No new resources required.

This course is designed to familiarize students with some of the most significant perspectives, methods, and theoretical tools employed by the discipline of cultural anthropology.  It seeks to give students insight into the wide-ranging cultural diversity of human populations while exploring critical and comparative perspectives on American culture.  Through these diverse examples we will be considering the role of culture in human behavior, mental processes, and social organization.  The course is aimed primarily at providing students with new ways of thinking: emphasis is on concepts, interpretation, and arguments rather than on facts, memorization, and data.  A student should leave this course prepared to apply anthropological concepts to understanding contemporary social events, and explain these interpretations to others.


Student Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, students will be able to: 


*  Employ specific ethnographic examples from around the world to consider diverse cultural perspectives on anthropological themes.


*  Identify and describe key theories and concepts in cultural anthropology.


*  Employ and critically assess key anthropological research methods. 


*  Apply the anthropological perspective to interpretations of non-U.S. peoples and cultures they encounter or read about as well as to understanding their own social lives. 


*  Compare specific social and cultural characteristics across social groups, including non-U.S. societies


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Participation15%0-5 participation points assigned per class.
Quizzes20%6 in class writings or short quizzes based on the readings; closed book.
Written Assignment15%Short participant-observation exercise with 3-5 pages write up on the experience.
Midterm25%take home, open book, essay exam
Final Exam25%take home, open book, essay exam
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
See attached course schedule.

dtcase (Thu, 12 May 2016 18:37:17 GMT): Rollback: Edits.
aeherget (Tue, 04 Oct 2016 20:35:59 GMT): AECHH: Uploading updated syllabus and editing description per instructor's request via email. 10-4-2016
aeherget (Wed, 12 Oct 2016 13:46:04 GMT): AECHH: Correcting Description and Updating new syllabus at D. Case request via email. 10/12/2016
lamarcus (Wed, 19 Oct 2016 20:10:17 GMT): GK information will need to be added for CUE prior to moving on to the CUE mtg.
afnewell (Mon, 14 Nov 2016 22:13:27 GMT): I believe I have made necessary changes to include Global Knowledge in syllabus and course leaf. Keep in mind that the course was approved in 2012 for Global Knowledge.
Key: 282