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Viewing: ANT 253 : Unearthing the Past: Introduction to World Archaeology

Last approved: Tue, 01 Nov 2016 08:02:11 GMT

Last edit: Fri, 28 Oct 2016 20:08:54 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
Major
ANT (Anthropology)
253
000736
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Unearthing the Past: Introduction to World Archaeology
Intr World Archaeo
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Sociology (16SOC)
Term Offering
Fall and Spring
Offered Every Year
Fall 2016
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
John Millhauser
Assistant Professor of Anthropology

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture15075YesNo comments
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16ANTHBAAnthropology BAElective
16INTSTGCSInternational Studies Global Cultural StudiesElective
World-wide survey of origins of human society, technology and culture in Old Stone Age, and origins of agriculture, cities, and civilizations of the Bronze and Iron Age in Europe, Asia, Africa, and pre-Columbian Middle and South America.

GEP Social Science Review. Course was previously approved for Global Knowledge.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Global Knowledge
Social Sciences
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Relate cultural developments around the world to processes internal and external to the culture.
 
 
I rely on exams to assess the breadth and depth of student knowledge in this domain. When I design questions to test this outcome, I generally want students to be able to link broad ideas and generalizations to specific pieces of empirical data (such as an artifact you could hold or a site you could visit). I make this expectation explicit in class, and I present information in lectures that makes these connections apparent.

Multiple choice questions from exams:

1. The pattern of domestication in the New World, as seen at sites in the Tehuacan Valley, differs from the process that took place in the Levant because, in the New World:

a. Mobile foragers domesticated plants long before they settled in permanent villages.
b. Technologies like grinding stones never developed.
c. New World farmers did not domesticate plants independently, outsiders taught them.
d. In the Tehuacan Valley, animals were domesticated before plants.
e. It only differed in terms of the particular plants involved.

2. What term denotes how leaders deployed resources to build the Great Wall of China, the Pyramids at Giza, and other large public works?

a. Reciprocity
b. Migration
c. Manifest Destiny
d. Mobilization
e. Taxation

3. Archaeologists have found that the _____________ of the Mississippian period reflect the development of political centralization, urbanization, and hierarchical social organization.

a. Writing system
b. Trade networks
c. Biodiversity
d. Settlement patterns
e. Ethnohistoric documents


True-false questions from exams (students have the opportunity to explain their answer with specific examples as a form of extra credit):

1. The process by which domestication occurred followed a different path in different parts of the world, depending on local circumstances.

2. The ancient Maya were united by a single language and unified under a single empire.
 
 
Explain how archaeologists collect, analyze, and interpret evidence
 
 
I assess this by means of the three assignments that students complete during the semester. They are only graded on two out of the three, but all three address the nature of collecting material data and arriving at an interpretation of social phenomena.

Assignment #1 involves (1) students documenting the trash that they produce over a 48 hour period, (2) interpreting how that trash reflects their gender, race, class, etc..., and (3) using the patterns they identified in step 2 to interpret the trash inventories of several households in terms of gender, age, race, class, etc...

Assignment #2 involves interpreting the materials buried in a fictional cemetery to arrive at generalized interpretations of the statuses of men and women, old and young, in that society.

Assignment #3 involves students working with an object from our archaeological collections to try to interpret its technological function, how it was produced, and describe the challenges of interpretation.
 
 
Identify and explain current conflicts about the past.
 
 
I rely on exams to assess the breadth and depth of student knowledge in this domain. When I design questions to test this outcome, I generally want students to be able to link specific historical conflicts with bigger issues in the present day -- especially those related to religion, political affiliation, and race. I make this expectation explicit in class, and I present information in lectures that makes these connections apparent.

The following questions look specifically at concepts such as cultural patrimony, cultural heritage, colonialism and post-colonial critiques, and the pristine myth. They also aim to remind students of the ways in which social science research is inextricably bound up in contemporary political struggles, which is an ethical component of the field.

Multiple choice questions from exams:

1. Which of the following sites were places that were misinterpreted by Colonial archaeologists?

a. Harappa and Angkor
b. Angkor and Great Zimbabwe
c. Great Zimbabwe and Uruk
d. Uruk and Xianyang
e. Xianyang and Harappa

2. UNESCO World Heritage Sites are important because they:

a. Create an international tribunal for prosecuting looters
b. Encourage nations to protect their cultural heritage and promote tourism
c. Allow the United Nations to take control of sites neglected by their governments
d. Provide U.N. peacekeepers as guards to protect endangered sites
e. All of the above

3. What was the end result of the excavation of the African Burial Ground site in Manhattan?

a. The cemetery was completely destroyed by heavy machinery before careful archaeological work could take place.
b. The remains of the individuals were re-buried and a national monument was built at the site.
c. The descendant population worked with the Army Corps of Engineers to prevent the burials from being fully analyzed.
d. The controversial site was re-buried and completely hidden under the new Government Services Office building that was constructed over it.
e. The situation remains an unresolved standoff among descendant populations, the Federal government, and archaeologists.


True-false questions from exams (students have the opportunity to explain their answer with specific examples as a form of extra credit):

1. Everyone agrees that the ancient objects and archaeological sites should be excavated and preserved for future generations.

2. When Europeans first arrived in North America, they found a landscape largely untouched by indigenous people.

3. Politics have had no impact in the investigation, interpretation, and preservation of archaeological sites or materials.
Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 
Demonstrate a thorough understanding of the diversity of past cultures and life ways in the prehistoric world, and be able to place specific sites within their environmental and culture-historical context.
 
 
Assessed through exam questions (multiple choice, true/false)

The murals discovered at Bonampak reveal which of the following?
A. The role of warfare among the Classic Maya
B. The importance of blood sacrifice at Teotihuacan
C. The Zapotec tradition of portraiture
D. The myth of Aztec origins at Chicomoztoc
E. The arrival of the Spaniards in the Inca empire
 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 
Identify the material culture, artifacts, and architecture of Mesoamerican cultures and explain their economic, social, and cultural significance in the past and present.
 
 
Assessed through exam questions (multiple choice, true/false)

The style of art and craft production at Teotihuacan is so distinctively different from other Mesoamerican styles because it…
A. makes such abundant use of rare pigments
B. reflects the skill and talents of individual artisans and craftspeople
C. downplays individuality in both subject matter and manufacturing technique
D. emphasizes the importance of individual rulers and their retinues
E. reflects the use of a highly advanced and complicated writing system
 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100%
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
n/a
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
n/a
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
n/a
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
n/a
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
Motel of Mysteries (Macauly 1979). ISBN 978-0395284254.
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
See attached topics list.
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
No change.
Part of the instructor's regular rotation.

-Examine human behavior, culture, organizations, and cultural processes

​-Demonstrate how social scientific methods may be applied to the above

-Use social science concepts to analyze and explain theoretical and real problems

-Gain a deeper appreciation for other cultures and peoples and human diversity

-Identify and examine distinguishing features of cultures outside the U.S.

-Compare the features of past societies and understand their historical contexts


Student Learning Outcomes

Students will be able to:

1. Explain how archaeologists collect, analyze, and interpret evidence;

2. Describe major sites, events, and processes of our shared human past;

3. Relate cultural developments around the world to processes internal and external to the culture;

4. Identify and explain current conflicts about the past.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Multiple exams60%(3 @ 20% each) The three in-class exams will consist of multiple-choice, matching, true-false, and map and timeline identifications. Most of each exam will be scantron based, but I reserve the right to include written sections. I will provide scantron sheets in class. Exams will cover, lectures, required readings, films, and discussions. The exams are not cumulative. You must take all three exams in order to receive a passing grade. Extra credit on exams cannot be used to increase a grade past 100%.
Forum_post20%You'll have a chance to respond to the required readings and videos on a Moodle forum. I will post questions to get you started, but you are free to respond to what you find most interesting or to the post of your fellow students (be polite, please). Forums will open on Monday at 9 AM and will close on Friday at midnight. Responses will be graded on a scale of 1 (unsatisfactory), 2 (satisfactory), or 3 (excellent). I will only count the best 10 out of the 15 possible responses in your final grade.
Written Assignment20%(2 @ 10%) There are three assignments that will involve data collection outside of class and the equivalent of 3-5 pages of writing. Assignments will be graded on a 10-point scale. I will only count two assignments in your final grade. If you complete all three, I will drop the lowest when calculating your final grade. Assignments are due by the start of class in hardcopy.
QuizNo percentI will occasionally assign worksheets related to lectures or films and provide test quizzes to help prepare for exams. These activities are means of self-assessment and your scores will not be included in the calculation of your final grade.
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
See attached topics list

aeherget (Wed, 12 Oct 2016 14:01:40 GMT): AECHH: Uploading syllabus via instructor's request via email. 10/12/2016
lamarcus (Wed, 19 Oct 2016 20:11:16 GMT): GK information will need to be added prior to CUE mtg.
Key: 283