Viewing: HI 346 : The Civil War Era in Popular Culture

Last approved: Thu, 09 Nov 2017 09:03:07 GMT

Last edit: Thu, 09 Nov 2017 09:03:07 GMT

Changes proposed by: smlee4
Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
Major
HI (History)
346
011559
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
The Civil War Era in Popular Culture
Civil War Era in Pop Culture
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
History (16HI)
54.0101
History, General.
Term Offering
Fall, Spring and Summer
Offered Every Year
Spring 2018
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)
Distance Education (DELTA)
Online (Internet)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Susanna Lee
Associate Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture7070Non/a
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Delivery FormatPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
LEC7070Non/a

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16HISTBAHistory BAElective
16HISTTEDHistory BA-Teacher Education ConcentrationElective
16HIMHistory MinorElective
16ABY 2097 GRP502History IIElective
Survey of the causes, trajectories, and consequences of the American Civil War and the social, political, and economic struggles of Reconstruction. Draws on history and literary studies to investigate how Americans represented and misrepresented the Civil War era, through an examination of popular culture. Emphasis on conflicts concerning regional identity, race, class, gender, and sexuality in the history and memory of the Civil War era.

This course action revises HI 346 to be taught in an online environment. The revised course, like the original course, provides an introduction to the history of the Civil War era. The revised course, however, also incorporates popular culture as a means to encourage students to connect the past with the present and to better take advantage of the online medium (through the incorporation of multimedia course materials). As the study of popular culture crosses disciplinary boundaries, the course is also revised to employ interdisciplinary perspectives, namely history and literary studies.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Humanities
Interdisciplinary Perspectives
US Diversity
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Describe the key events in the social, political, economic, and cultural history of the Civil War and Reconstruction with particular attention to the various perspectives and experiences of different groups of Americans.
 
 
Students will read a textbook on the social, political, economic, and cultural history of the Civil War and Reconstruction and take a quiz to measure their knowledge.

Sample quiz questions:

1. The textbook chapter stresses the impact of the “revolutionary heritage” on the ultimate fate of slavery in the United States. Drawing on the textbook chapter, identify each of the following statements as either “true” or “false.”

2. Drawing on the textbook chapter’s exploration of the lives of enslaved people in the South, identify each of the following statements as either “true” or “false.”
 
 
Identify and analyze arguments and evidence in scholarship.
 
 
In quizzes on readings, students will be asked to identify arguments and evidence in scholarship. This assignment highlights the act of interpretation as both McPherson and Berlin used the same evidence but arrived at different interpretations.

Example Questions on Lincoln (2012): Part 1: How did historians James McPherson and Ira Berlin answer the question “who freed the slaves?” in different ways? Compare and contrast their interpretations, approaches, and evidence.
 
 
Formulate academic arguments, situate arguments within scholarly debates, and deploy evidence to support arguments.
 
 
In quizzes on readings, students will be asked to advance their own arguments, and to deploy evidence to support their arguments.

Example Questions on Lincoln (2012): Part 2: Make your own argument about who freed the slaves. Be sure to situate your interpretation within the scholarly debate between McPherson and Berlin, and be sure to cite evidence in support of your argument. Part 3: How does the film Lincoln (2012) depict the process of emancipation? How accurate is the film in its depiction?
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Distinguish between the distinct approaches and interpretations of history and literary studies.
 
 
Students will be assigned scholarship in history and literary studies. Readings will be accompanied by questions that highlight the different approaches by testing students on the different questions, evidence, and interpretations from the two disciplines.

Example: Consider the different approaches to interpreting popular culture: text-oriented, author-oriented, reader-oriented, and context-oriented. Read the article by Brenda Stevenson (History, UC Los Angeles) on 12 Years a Slave (2013) in Journal of African American History and the article by John Stauffer (English, Harvard) in American Literary History. Analyze each author’s approach in their formulation of questions and selection of evidence, and analyze how such differences shape their interpretations.
 
 
Identify and apply connections between history and literary studies.
 
 
Students will identify connections in scholarship in history and literary studies. Some scholars in both disciplines adopt text-oriented, context-oriented, author-oriented, and (to a lesser extent) audience-oriented approaches that interpret popular culture, their creators, and their audiences within their historical context. Students will apply connections between history and literary studies in analyzing popular culture using context-, author-, and audience-oriented approaches (through their discussion board posts).

Example: Choose an interpretively rich scene from the assigned movie. In a discussion post, analyze the scene using text-oriented, context-oriented, and/or author-oriented approach(es) drawn from history and literary studies. Your discussion post must articulate an argument and engage with the assigned scholarship in history and literary studies.
 
 
Explore and synthesize the approaches and interpretations of history and literary studies.
 
 
Students will research and analyze a movie of their choice. Students will conduct research on the movie in history and literary studies. Students will write a brief essay that synthesizes the scholarship on the movie. In this essay, students must incorporate at least three of the main approaches (text-, author-, reader, and context-oriented) and must incorporate work by scholars in both history and literary studies.
 
 
History and literary studies: Literary studies overlaps with history in context-oriented approaches--such as literary history, historicism, and new historicism--and also text-oriented and author-oriented approaches.
 
 
The course incorporates frequent reflection on and application of disciplinary approaches. Students will first be introduced to the different disciplinary approaches. Students will be assigned a reading at the beginning of the semester on how to interpret American popular culture using text-, author-, reader-, and context-oriented approaches drawn from history and literary studies. This reading will provide an overview of each approach and list potential questions students can pose to begin generating interpretations of a popular culture artifact. Students will then be asked to identify, analyze, evaluate, and apply the different disciplinary approaches. They will be assigned scholarship from history and literary studies each unit and will be asked to reflect on each scholar’s approach (in quizzes). Each reading will include a brief biography, identifying the author’s discipline and scholarly credentials. Students will also be assigned a popular culture artifact each unit and will be asked to interpret it using approaches from history and literary studies from one or more of the approaches and to comment on at least two fellow students’ interpretations (in discussion board posts). Students synthesize various approaches in follow-up posts. Finally, for their final projects, students will consider critiques of American popular culture (by scholars of history and literary studies) and will “remix” existing popular culture artifact(s) or create a new media “text” related to the Civil War era, such as a podcast, movie, or short story, that addresses these scholarly critiques. Students will then write an essay reflecting on the theoretical and scholarly works that underpin their creative work.
Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 
Analyze the historical, social, political, and economic processes producing equality and inequality during the American Civil War and Reconstruction; and analyze the encoding of this equality and inequality in American popular culture.
 
 
Each unit will focus on a particular time period. Students will be assigned readings that highlight inequalities in the time period. Students will complete quizzes that will assess students’ ability to correctly identify the authors’ interpretation and evidence as they relate to equality and inequality. Students will then be asked to analyze representations of race, class, gender, sexuality, and region in a popular culture artifact and to determine to what extent historical inequalities are perpetuated and/or redressed in the popular culture artifact.

Sample Question on Birth of a Nation (1915): Part 1: Read the secondary sources on the South Carolina legislature during Congressional Reconstruction from the Dunning, revisionist, and post-revisionist schools. Answer the following questions: What are the different interpretations about “negro domination” during Congressional Reconstruction? What inequalities does each scholar identify, and what produced these inequalities? What social, political, and economic factors most contributed to the movement against inequality during Reconstruction? How does each author’s evidentiary base limit his interpretation? Part 2: Watch the scene in Birth of a Nation (1915) depicting the South Carolina legislature under Congressional Reconstruction. Answer the following questions: How did the film depict black and white southerners during Congressional Reconstruction? What oppressions did the film present? And what did the film identify as the cause of these oppressions?
 
 
Evaluate the role of people of different races, classes, and genders in the movement to abolish slavery before and during Civil War and in the struggles for equality after the Civil War; and assess how accurately American popular culture depicts the agency of different races, classes, and genders.
 
 
Each unit will focus on a particular time period / topic. Students will be assigned readings that highlight the agency of different races, classes, and genders in the time period / topic. Students will complete quizzes that will assess their ability to correctly identify the authors’ interpretation and evidence as they relate to agency. Students will then be asked to evaluate how accurately American popular culture represents the agency of different races, classes, and genders.

Example Questions on Lincoln (2012): Part 1: How did historians James McPherson and Ira Berlin answer the question “who freed the slaves?” in different ways? Compare and contrast their interpretations, approaches, and evidence. Part 2: Make your own argument about who freed the slaves. Be sure to situate your interpretation within the scholarly debate between McPherson and Berlin, and be sure to cite evidence in support of your argument. Part 3: How does the film Lincoln (2012) depict the process of emancipation? How accurate is the film in its depiction? [Part 1 focuses on the role of different people in effecting emancipation as McPherson gives credit to Abraham Lincoln while Berlin gives credit to the slaves themselves. Part 3 asks students to analyze how responsibility for emancipation is depicted in the film Lincoln (2012).]
 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
n/a
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
n/a
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
n/a
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
n/a
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
See attached syllabus.
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
See attached syllabus.
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
See attached syllabus.
College(s)Contact NameStatement Summary
College of Humanities and Social SciencesTony HarrisonHi, Susanna. Like Anne, I see no overlap with related English courses, just complementarity. It looks like an exciting course! Best, Tony (Harrison in English)

Dear Susanna, I think HI 346 looks great. I see no overlap between your syllabus and any courses regularly offered by the English department, though it certainly complements several American literature courses we offer. I look forward to being able to recommend this course to students of mine interested in nineteenth-century U.S. culture and popular representations of history. Best, Anne (Baker in English)
This is a revision to an existing course that is already part of the instructor's regular course load. Therefore, no additional resources are needed.

Student Learning Outcomes

Describe the key events in the social, political, economic, and cultural history of the American Civil War and Reconstruction with particular attention to the various perspectives and experiences of different groups of Americans.


Analyze the historical, social, political, and economic processes producing equality and inequality during the American Civil War and Reconstruction; and analyze the encoding of this equality and inequality in American popular culture.


Evaluate the role of people of different races, classes, and genders in the movement to abolish slavery before and during the American Civil War and in the struggles for equality after the war; and assess how accurately American popular culture depicts the agency of different races, classes, and genders.


Identify and analyze arguments and evidence in scholarship; and formulate academic arguments, situate arguments within scholarly debates, and deploy evidence to support arguments.


Distinguish between the distinct approaches and interpretations of history and literary studies; identify and apply connections between history and literary studies; and explore and synthesize the approaches and interpretations of history and literary studies.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Project500Students will consider critiques of American popular culture (by scholars of history and literary studies). Students will “remix” existing popular culture artifact(s) or create a new media “text” related to the Civil War era, such as a movie or short story, that addresses these scholarly critiques. Students will write a two- to three-page essay reflecting on the theoretical and scholarly works that underpin their creative work.
Homework1000Students will submit discussion posts and complete readings assessments for nine topical units (900 points). Students will also create their own unit on a popular culture artifact of their choice (100 points).
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
See attached syllabus.

aeherget (Wed, 11 Oct 2017 14:36:35 GMT): AECHH: Uploading updated syllabus at instructor's request via email 10/10/2017.
Key: 2983
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