Viewing: HI 321 : Scientific Revolution and European Society, 1500-1800

Last approved: Thu, 22 Mar 2018 08:00:39 GMT

Last edit: Tue, 20 Mar 2018 14:25:46 GMT

Changes proposed by: kimler
Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
Major
HI (History)
321
011538
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Scientific Revolution and European Society, 1500-1800
Scientific Revolution
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
History (16HI)
54.0101
History, General.
Term Offering
Fall Only
Offered Every Year
Fall 2018
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Mi Gyung Kim
Professor of History

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture7070No
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote


Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16HISTBAHistory - BAElective
16HISTBSHistory - BSElective
16HIMHistory MinorElective
16STSBAScience, Technology and Society - BAElective
16STSBSScience, Technology and Society - BSElective
16STMScience, Technology and Society MinorElective
Exploration of the changing role that the arts, technology, and sciences played in shaping early modern European culture, society, and global power, between 1500 and 1800. Examination of the historical context of developments such as machine-making, new scientific ideas, patronage of science and technology, the formation of distinct technical and scientific fields, nation-building projects, and global ventures.

With loss of faculty who taught survey history of ancient science and advanced history of the Scientific Revolution, we are revising our sequence of history of science courses to provide a survey-level course on the Scientific Revolution, a topic which employs the methodological core of history of science and of science and technology studies (STS). It is central to understanding the place of science and technology in modern culture. The course will be available as an interdisciplinary course to a wide range of students.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Global Knowledge
Humanities
Interdisciplinary Perspectives
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Identify major contextual factors – social, political, religious and techno-scientific – that interacted in shaping the process of building European nations/empires.
 
 
Midterm Exam essay prompt: The Scientific Revolution has often been characterized as a fundamental transformation in the world-view from the geocentric to the heliocentric universe, or as the rise of mathematics as a way of seeing the world, or as the instituting of experimental culture that constituted modern science. Choose one of these main interpretations of the Scientific Revolution and delineate the main characters, institutional locales, socio-cultural and religious contexts, and political structures that helped foster such a fundamental transformation.
 
 
Articulate the relationship between the scientific/technological universals and the logic of European expansion.
 
 
In-class Written Assignment prompts: What were the most important branches of ‘science’ during the heydays of the Iberian empires? How important were maps in constructing a trans-national knowledge space, and were they necessarily hegemonic?
 
 
Compare and contrast divergent strategies of fashioning careers by various scientists and machinists to identify and analyze their institutional entrenchment and growth.
 
 
Homework Assignment: What does Galileo’s Letter to the Grand Duchess Christina tell you about his effort to win over the Medici court? How does his political patronage differ from Robert Boyle’s effort to stabilize the Royal Society of London as a consensus-making institution in science and politics?
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Analyze foundational scientific texts and representative machines from historical and techno-scientific perspectives as methods for understanding the rhetorical and social functions of ideas and machines in specific contexts.
 
 
Homework Assignment: What was the function of “Solomon’s House,” in Francis Bacon’s New Atlantis, in organizing scientific research and technological innovation for a prosperous Christian commonwealth? How did his goals for research fit into the context of failing colonial ventures?
 
 
Describe the larger historical context in which techno-science developed in society, and the social structures that constrain career and institutional moves at the individual level, and apply these perspectives to compare and contrast divergent strategies of fashioning careers by scientists and machinists in early modern Europe.
 
 
In-Class Assignment: What were the main political and social differences between the Fellows of the Royal Society of London and the members of the Paris Academy of Sciences?
 
 
Articulate the relationship between the scientific/technological universals and the logic of European global expansion.
 
 
Final Exam Essay prompt: In this class, we have traced successive visions of empire – Iberian, Dutch, British, and French – which supposedly produced variations on the theme: universal monarchy, science, and epistemology would ensure that European centers of empire would craft a transparent cognitive regime (and culture) that would be adopted by the global population. Discuss how this consciousness of Western science was seen to offer credibility as the most rational, unbiased system of knowledge, and discuss the problems with this interpretation in relation to other forms or sources of knowledge that we have addressed in class.
 
 
History and Science & Technology Studies
 
 
Throughout the course, students will be prompted when reading primary sources to discern the core repertoire of major scientific ideas and path-breaking machines and to differentiate their historical meanings from the types of social analysis provide by the STS perspective. Such a consciously comparative approach to historical and STS analysis should instruct the students on the divergent scholarly methods that affect our assessment of science and technology. Students will be prompted to situate scientific ideas and machines in their broader historical contexts to understand their genesis, and their impact on the larger development of Europe and its global expansion. The students will be required to read the secondary sources written by historians and STS scholars to apply their different perspectives in interpreting the primary sources for a final synthetic essay reflecting on the new “universal” knowledge of science and technology in the context of European global expansion.
Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 
Discern major characteristics of European scientific and technological developments from the 16th to the 18th centuries.
 
 
In-Class Assignment: Identify a major scientific and technological accomplishment in the late Renaissance, in early modern Europe, and in the Enlightenment period. For each, discuss whether contemporaries saw it as fitting philosophical (“science”) or artisan (“technology”) knowledge, and how the value implied by the terms is changing over this period.
 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 
Identify major contextual factors – social, political, religious and techno-scientific – that interacted with the process of building European nations/empires.
 
 
In-Class Assignment: How different were the patronage schemes for Galileo, Boyle, and Maupertuis? How did their situations reflect the religious, institutional, and political context of the nation/state in which they worked?
 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100%
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
N/A
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
N/A
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
NONE
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
NONE
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
Michael Adas, Machines as the Measure of Men (Cornell University Press, 2015; ISBN 0801479800), $20.22

Jonathan Sawday, Engines of the Imagination: Renaissance Culture and the Rise of the Machine (Routledge, 2007; ISBN 041535062X), $34.42

Julien Offray de la Mettrie, Man a machine (orig. 1748; Hackett, 1994; ISBN 0872201945), $16
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
See syllabus
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

No additional resources will be required, as Prof. Kim will substitute this course for her standard rotation of teaching HI 322. The department has sufficient faculty resources to meet demand in HI 322.

1. Place scientific ideas and machines in their concrete historical contexts;


2. Examine the role of science and technology in shaping early modern European culture, nation-building, and engagement with the world;


3. Apply historical evidence and argumentation to interpretation of the power of science and technology in shaping European civilization and global history.


Student Learning Outcomes

Students who complete this course will be able to:



  1. Identify the political, religious, and cultural developments in Europe from the 16th to the 18th centuries.

  2. Identify major developments that interacted with other forces that shaped the process of building European nations/empires.

  3. Analyze foundational scientific texts and representative machines from multiple perspectives – historical and techno-scientific – to understand their rhetorical and social functions in historical contexts.

  4. Compare and contrast divergent strategies of fashioning careers by various scientists and machinists to identify and analyze their institutional entrenchment and growth within European society.

  5. Articulate the relationship between the idea of scientific/technological universals and the logic of European expansion.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Written Assignment20%See Syllabus
Quizzes20%See Syllabus
Midterm20%see Syllabus
Final Exam40%see Syllabus

aeherget (Tue, 06 Feb 2018 18:59:43 GMT): AECHH: Uploaded updated syllabus at initiator's request via email Feb. 6, 2018.
Key: 3032
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