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Viewing: LAR 501 : Landscape Architecture Introduction Design Studio

Last approved: Sat, 05 May 2018 08:00:42 GMT

Last edit: Tue, 17 Apr 2018 19:46:34 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
Major
LAR (Landscape Architecture)
501
013415
Dual-Level Course
No
Cross-listed Course
No
Landscape Architecture Introduction Design Studio
LAR Intro Design Studio
College of Design
Landscape Architecture (12LAR)
Term Offering
Fall Only
Offered Every Year
Fall 2018
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded/Audit
6
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Studio9.0
Course Attribute(s)


If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Gene Bressler
Professor
full

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Studio201Non/a
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote


Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
12MLAMRMaster of Landscape Architecture, Track 3Required
Introduction to landscape architectural design thinking processes and applications that include: site analysis, post occupancy user studies, programming, site planning, graphic representation (drawing, model making, digital graphics), verbal communication, and criticism and reflection.

Course syllabus revised to reflect emphasis on:  Design thinking processes, place making, various forms of graphic representation including drawing, analog and digital models, and delivery of discipline related theoretical and technical content.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
GEP Categories

Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 

 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 

 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 

 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 

Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 

 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

This is an existing course. No new resources are required.

The goals of this studio are to introduce first semester/first year Master of Landscape Architecture students, (and others as permitted to take this course with department head or DGP approval) to:



  1. fundamental principles of landscape architectural design, including site analysis, site planning, program development, design criticism and self reflection;

  2. methods and techniques pertaining to landscape architectural drawing, digital modeling and representation, physical model making, and graphic and verbal communication.


Student Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, students will be able to:


Study, describe, and evaluate how people use landscapes;


Produce a Project Definition Study that identifies and describes design issues, affected constituents, and situations/problems to be addressed in the planning and design of landscapes;


Analyze non complicated, site specific, and contextual landscape conditions in terms of opportunities and constraints to accommodate development;


Design, apply, and evaluate various design thinking methods to develop alternative site plans at various scales of resolution. These plans should accommodate diverse program elements on non-complicated sites and considers sustainable design practices, and strategies for site development including grading, drainage, planting and landscape dynamics;


Apply various communication  and representational methods including written, oral, drawing, physical and digital modeling  and representation  to explore, test, develop, and communicate design ideas.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Project70Students will complete 4-6 one to three week-long design project/case studies and 2-4 short-term projects. More information will be given at the beginning of the semester describing each assignment/project.
Attendance10Students are expected to attend all scheduled studio classes and field trips
Participation20Students will actively participate in critical reflective discussions
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Introduction to sequence and placemaking3 weeksAssignment: Place A to Place B and Back

Landscape Perception and Environmental Factors 3 WeeksPlace, Behavior, and Site Systems:
Introduction to Post Occupancy Evaluation: How people use an existing landscape
Introduction to Site Planning and Design Processes11 Weeks 2 weeks: Part 1: Project Definition Study:
Site planning issues,
site analysis,
program analysis

5 weeks: Part 2: General Development Plan: Fitting a development program on a site

Diagramming
Designing and testing alternative development concepts
Accommodating program elements
Circulation hierarchies
Conceptual site grading
Reflection

4 weeks: Part 3: Design Development:

Refining the General Development Plan
3D Analog Modeling
Digital media studies: modeling and representation
Assembling the final “package.”
Reflection
The following books are recommended:
Hargreaves, George et al, Landscape Alchemy: The Work of Hargreaves Associates Hardcover – 2009.

Landscape Architecture, Fifth Edition: A Manual of Environmental Planning and Design (P/L Custom Scoring Survey) 5th Edition by Barry Starke (Author), John Ormsbee Simonds (Author) ($75.00)

Whyte, William H., The Social Life of Small Urban Places, Washington, D.C.: Conservation Foundations, 1980. ($25.00)

Holden, Robert, Landscape Architecture: An Introduction, Laurence King Publishing, ltd., 2014. ($27.00)

Martin, Justin, Genius of Place, The Life of Fredrick Law Olmsted, Da Capo Press, 2011. ($15.00)

Anatomy of a Park: Essentials of Recreation Area Planning and Design 3rd Edition by Bernard Dahl (Author), Donald J. Molnar ($25.00)

Site Engineering for Landscape Architects 6th Edition by Steven Strom (Author), Kurt Nathan (Author), Jake Woland (Author) ($25.00)

Landscape Architect's Portable Handbook Feb 16, 2001 by Nicholas T. Dines and Kyle D. Brown ($35.00)

OJB Landscape Architecture, 2017

In addition, a variety of books, articles, reports and white papers will also be made available via Class Store, Moodle or the library reserves.

Course may be taken by non majors on a space available basis with department head consent.
---------------

mlnosbis 2/20/2018:
-Syllabus should include full instructor contact information (including phone number). This syllabus indicates that both instructors have the same office hours, is that correct?
-Syllabus should include a breakdown of how grades are determined. Listing the PRR is not enough. Explain how assignments will be graded and what constitutes each letter grade. Example: A+ = ____, A = ____, etc.

cohen 2/22/2018:
1. The 4th bullet under student learning outcomes is hard to understand (although I do recognize that specialists may find the wording to be ok). I would suggest replacing:
Design, apply, and evaluate various design thinking methods to develop alternative site plans at
various scales of resolution that accommodates diverse program elements on non-complicated
sites and considers sustainable design practices, and strategies for site development including
grading, drainage, planting and landscape dynamics;
with two sentences along the lines of:
Design, apply, and evaluate various design thinking methods to develop alternative site plans at
various scales of resolution. These plans should accommodate diverse program elements on non-
complicated sites, and should consider sustainable design practices and strategies for site
development including grading, drainage, planting and landscape dynamics;
2. Under Excused Absences (Section 9) on the syllabus, it appears that students must contact the instructor prior to class for each excused absence. There are times when that may not be possible. (The example on the syllabus is potentially one such time.) How will those absences be treated?

ABGS Reviewer Comments 4/17/2018:
- Does the syllabus need to explain what is required for auditing? NO
- Are students penalized twice for absences? Attendance makes up 10% of their grade and if they miss class the instructor may lower their grade? Are these two penalties for the same thing? Or if a student is absent the 10% portion of the grade will be reduced? I am unclear about how a grade will be affected by absences.
- The syllabus description of grading criteria for projects seems incomplete and a bit vague: It states :"Students will complete 4-6 one to three week-long design project/case studies and 2-4 short," Can this be made more specific? The number of weeks does not match. It says 16 weeks in one location and the allocation of time in the schedule sums to 15.5 weeks.
mlnosbis (Thu, 01 Oct 2015 20:26:52 GMT): Rollback: Rollback to Gene Bressler as requested.
Key: 3403