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Viewing: MUS 120 : Introduction to Music Theory

Last approved: Wed, 01 Jun 2016 08:18:39 GMT

Last edit: Wed, 01 Jun 2016 08:18:39 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
MUS (Music)
120
016039
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Introduction to Music Theory
Intro Music Theory
Division of Academic and Student Affairs
Music (24MUS)
Term Offering
Fall, Spring and Summer
Offered Every Year
Summer 2 2016
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)
Distance Education (DELTA)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
John Fuller
Teaching Associate Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture2020NoOnly one section offered each semester
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Delivery FormatPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
LEC2020NoOnly one section offered during summer session
None
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
No
Introduction to Music Theory is designed for students with minimal or no music theory background and covers the fundamentals of music, including note reading in treble and bass clefs, rhythm, meter, scales, key signatures, intervals, triads, and basic keyboard skills. This course prepares students for entry into Music Theory I (MUS 103) and Aural Skills I (MUS 104), although students may elect to test out by means of a placement test. Students may be required to provide their own transportation to and cover the cost of an on- or off-campus event. Auditing is not permitted. Prerequisites: None.

This course is undergoing revision in the title, catalog description, and GEP outcomes and measures.  The current title "Rudiments of Music" does not intuitively lead students to recognize that this course prepares them for entry into Music Theory I (MUS 103).  By renaming the course "Introduction to Music Theory," students have a better understanding of its purpose as a preparatory course for Music Theory I.  The revised description and GEP outcomes and measures better convey how the course has been taught for the past 4 years. 


Yes
Students may be required to provide their own transportation to and cover the cost of an on- or off-campus event.
Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Visual & Performing Arts
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Students will identify theoretical components—including rhythm, intervals, keys, scales, and chords—in passages from Western art, folk, and popular music of the past 400 years.
 
 
Students will complete regular homework and tests that measure their comprehension of the basic theoretical principles establishing Western music. Sample homework or test question: You are given the melody of the English folk song “Greensleeves.” Create a pitch collection and then determine the minor scale on which this song is based.
 
 
Students will explain theoretical concepts occurring in compositions after listening to live and recorded performances.
 
 
Students will attend a live concert and write a graded essay that measures their ability to perceive and evaluate the comparative treatment of musical elements after only one hearing.
 
 
Students will demonstrate accepted standards of melodic construction and artistic creativity
 
 
Students will compose short melodies in given major or minor keys and will be graded for evidence of tonic orientation, pitch accuracy, coherent melodic contour, and rhythmic notation.
Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
N/A
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
N/A
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
None
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
None. Students may test out of this course by means of a placement test.
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
• White, Gary C. Music First! 6th ed. New York: McGraw Hill, 2011. ISBN-13 9780073137742 ($56). Audio examples located at http://highered.mcgraw-hill.com/sites/0078110653/student_view0/index.html
• Thompson, John. John Thompson’s Adult Preparatory Piano Book (Book One). Cincinnati: Willis Music Co. ($10).
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
Please see attached syllabus
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
Students may be required to provide their own transportation to and cover the cost of an on- or off-campus event.
No new resources

Student Learning Outcomes

By the end of the semester the student will be able to:



  • Identify theoretical components—including rhythm, intervals, keys, scales, and chords—in passages from Western art, folk, and popular music of the past 400 years.  

  • Explain theoretical concepts occurring in compositions after listening to live and recorded performances.

  • Demonstrate accepted standards of melodic construction and artistic creativity.

  • Demonstrate ability to confidently read notation in treble and bass clefs through written exercises in class and homework assignments.

  • Distinguish between simple and compound meters in written and sung exercises.

  • Recognize and construct interval structures of various qualities and quantities.

  • Exhibit knowledge of all forms of major and minor scale structures as found in Western Art Music through visual and aural analysis.

  • Display through analysis a recognition of triads in all forms and inversions and an ability to read popular chord symbols.

  • Perform short musical etudes and excerpts through sight singing and on the keyboard.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Test9 tests evenly weighted9 tests = 60% of course grade
HomeworkVariesHomework (i.e., out-of-class work) = 30% of course grade
OtherPiano lab assignmentsPiano lab assignments = 10% of course grade
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Please see syllabusVariesPlease see syllabus
The following revisions to this course are being forwarded for committee consideration:
1. Course title
2. Course description
3. GEP outcomes and measures
Prior syllabus and GEP outcomes/measures are attached as additional documentation

Key: 3993