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Viewing: MUS 200 : Understanding Music: Global Perspectives

Last approved: Tue, 18 Apr 2017 08:02:29 GMT

Last edit: Tue, 18 Apr 2017 08:02:29 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
Major
MUS (Music)
200
016044
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Understanding Music: Global Perspectives
Undstnd Mus Glob Persp
Division of Academic and Student Affairs
Music (24MUS)
Term Offering
Fall, Spring and Summer
Offered Every Year
Spring 2017
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)
Distance Education (DELTA)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Jonathan C.Kramer and Alison Arnold
Teaching Professor and Teaching Assistant Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture1919NoAs an FYI course
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Delivery FormatPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
LEC5050NoAs a DELTA course

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
No
Understanding Music is a semester-long exploration of music's materials, contexts, and purposes. We will consider music as a global phenomenon and commonality of human social experience. Through videos, readings and listening to both recorded and live music from diverse world regions, we will examine the occasions and purposes of music making and listening. We will explore the ways in which traditions, values, belief systems, and patterns of social change are encoded and made manifest in musical practices. The ability to read music is not expected. This course can fulfill either the Interdisciplinary Perspectives (IP) or Visual & Performing Arts (VPA) GEP requirements, and the Global Knowledge (GK) co-requisite requirement.

This course is undergoing VPA and GK GEP review.  In addition, the department is seeking IP credit.  


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Global Knowledge
Interdisciplinary Perspectives
Visual & Performing Arts
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Distinguish between disciplinary methodologies by which various aspects of musical experience are understood, i.e. Musicology, Ethnomusicology, and Anthropology.
 
 
Students respond to the following question in Paper 3:
Choose one origin of music myth (Anthropology) and one origin of music theory (Musicology) and write a paragraph on each, explaining what each myth tells us about attitudes, beliefs, and values related to music held by the culture from which the myth originates. Write a third paragraph comparing the two in terms of their explanatory power to promote human survival and reproductive advantage.
 
 
Explain the differences between various aspects of a society, such as the relationship between music and social life (Anthropology).
 
 
In Paper 4, students answer the following question:
Compare in both anthropological and ethnomusicological terms the roles music plays in both structural and anti-structural rituals. In your comparison, identify and discuss a specific example of each.
 
 
Synthesize from these multiple lenses a comprehensive sense of music in human culture and as human culture.
 
 
Students respond to the following question in Paper 2:
Consider the case study "Multicultural Societies (Suriname)" in your e-textbook and describe how each of the five ethnic groups that make up Surinamese society expresses identity through music and dance: Maroon, Native American, Creole, Hindustani, and Javanese.
 
 
Musicology and Anthropology
 
 
Musical examples are presented both in terms of musicological analysis and in terms that anthropologists use to describe components of human culture. Through these two disciplinary lenses, students will be able to synthesize a comprehensive view of music in human life.
Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Interpret and analyze music on the basis of its structural, stylistic, and aesthetic elements and its social and historical contexts.
 
 
In Paper 1, students answer the following question:
Describe in your own words the biological and cultural reasons for vocal diversity in human beings (Lesson 2). In your discussion, consider the following three examples: a) Young Voices (Video 2-2); b) Katajjaq (Video 2-4); and c) Vesti La Guibba - The Three Tenors (Audio 2-4).
 
 
Interpret and critically evaluate ideas and conclusions in writings on musical practices based on the evidence provided by authors.
 
 
In Paper 1, students answer the following question:
In your first paragraph (labeled 1a), discuss John Blacking’s definition of music as “humanly-organized sound” (Lesson 1). In a second paragraph (labeled 1b), how is Blacking's definition incomplete in comparison with our class definition of music? Finally in a third paragraph (labeled 1c), based on our definition of music, why is the example of the Swiss Cowherds (Audio 1-2) both music and not music?
 
 
Identify and analyze music’s complex relationships with social and religious beliefs and experiences.
 
 
In Paper 3, students answer the following question:
In his article on music and religion, Ter Ellingson states that:
"Music enhances, intensifies, and transforms almost any experience into something felt not only as different but also as somehow better. In this power to transform and heighten human experience, music resembles religion itself; and when the energies of music and religion are focused on the same object, toward a common meaning and goal, intensification reaches a peak greater than either might achieve by itself."
First, in 1a, discuss in your own words the ways that music, like religion, can transform and heighten human experience. Then discuss your findings as they relate to the following TWO sacred music contexts: 1b) evangelical praise and worship, as seen in the video of Australian pastor and singer-songwriter Darlene Zschech leading the song, "Here In My Life" (Lesson 10, Video 10-16); and 1c) the trombone shout band in Washington, D.C., as seen playing for the funeral of Elder Norvus "Little John" Miller (Lesson 11, Video 11-1, especially 10'33" to the end).
Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 
Distinguish the roles of music in expressing social identity.
 
 
Re-read the Lesson 10 section on "Christian Hymnody" in Uganda (pp. 159-161), and watch again the four linked videos, 10-18 to 10-21. In 1a, explain in your own words what the song contest is and how it relates to the Second Vatican Council. Then in 1b, discuss how the dual identities of "Catholic" and "African" are expressed in the music and dance of the contest. Be sure to incorporate in your discussions observations and comparisons made from watching the four video clips and reading the lesson text.
 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 
Analyze the roles music plays in enhancing human social life.
 
 
In Paper 4, students answer the following question:
First re-read the case studies on Korean Pansori and the Epic of Pabuji in Lesson 13, and watch the related videos (13-11, 13-12, and 13-13). Also watch this excerpt from the Pansori tale Chunhyang-ga ("Song of Chunhyang"). How is the recitation of Chunhyang-ga like the recitation of the Epic of Pabuji? How are they different? In your comparison, consider the context, meaning, and performance style of each (see Lesson 1).
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
No
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
No.
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
None.
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
None.
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
What in the World is Music? - Alison Arnold and Jonathan Kramer
Edition: 1st
ISBN: 9781138790254
Web Link: https://www.routledge.com/What-in-the-World-is-Music---Enhanced-E-Book--Print-Book-Pack/Arnold-Kramer/p/book/9781138790254
Cost: $85
This textbook is required.
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
Please see attached syllabus.
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
None.
College(s)Contact NameStatement Summary
College of Humanities and Social SciencesConsultation received from HSS on 3/6/16. See response below under "reviewer comments."
No new resources

See syllabus


Student Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will


1. Identify and apply the basic concepts and terms used in musical investigation to specific musical performances.


2. Interpret and analyze music on the basis of its structural, stylistic, and aesthetic elements and its social and historical contexts.


3. Interpret and critically evaluate ideas and conclusions in writings on musical practices based on the evidence provided by authors.


4. Distinguish the roles of music in expressing social identity.


5. Identify and analyze music’s complex relationships with religious beliefs and experiences.


6. Analyze the roles music plays in enhancing human social life.


7. Distinguish between disciplinary methodologies by which various aspects of musical experience are understood, i.e. Musicology, Ethnomusicology, and Anthropology.


8. Explain the differences between various aspects of a society, such as the relationship between music and social life (Anthropology).


9. Synthesize from these multiple lenses a comprehensive sense of music in human culture and as human culture.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Short Paper4 papers, each at 25%All four papers need to be completed in full or no credit is given for the course.
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Please see syllabus

kkharris (Mon, 06 Mar 2017 19:13:37 GMT): Consultation received from HSS on 3/6/16 On Mon, Mar 6, 2017 at 8:29 AM, Deanna Dannels <dpdannel@ncsu.edu> wrote: Good morning Barbara: The anthropology program has reviewed the MUS 200 course and feel that it is a good complement to their offerings and would be a good elective course to add for students for students interested in music cross culturally. There is no overlap with their offerings at this time. I have not heard back from one other consultation, but wanted to send this along. Best, Deanna
aeherget (Fri, 24 Mar 2017 14:49:22 GMT): AECHH: Uploading updated syllabus at instructor's request via email 3/24/2017.
Key: 4007