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Viewing: PHI 309 : Political Philosophy

Last approved: Wed, 01 Jun 2016 08:19:41 GMT

Last edit: Wed, 01 Jun 2016 08:19:41 GMT

Change Type
Major
PHI (Philosophy)
309
017206
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Political Philosophy
Political Philosophy
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Philosophy and Religion (16PHI)
Term Offering
Spring Only
Offered Every Year
Summer 1 2016
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Timothy J. Hinton
Professor of Philosophy

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture3535NoNone
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Prerequisite: One PHI course
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16PHILBAPhilosophy-BAElective
16PHILLAWPhilosophy-BA Philosophy of Law concentrationRequired
16PHILETHPhilosophy-BA Philosphy Ethics Concentration Elective
16PHILBSPhilosophy-BS Elective
16PSLJLPolitical Science-BA Law & Justice-Law & TheoryElective
Philosophical study of important political ideas and values such as liberty, equality, justice, rights, and democracy. May include readings from classical and contemporary sources.

The instructor's experience with students has shown that they need more of the relevant historical background for contemporary views and the revision in content addresses this need. In the present version of the course, there is almost no discussion of Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Kant or Berlin; the proposed version adds discussion of these historical predecessors of contemporary political philosophers. (See the attached syllabus for relevant details.)


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Humanities
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Student Learning Outcome: By the end of the course, students will be able to relate important philosophical accounts of such fundamental goods as liberty, equality, justice, and democracy to the human experience.
Relation of Course Specific Learning Outcome to GEP: The philosophers we study in this course offer deep, interesting, and controversial accounts of such fundamental goods as liberty, equality, justice, and democracy. By interpreting these accounts, students will learn to apply them to the human experience.
 
 
Essay questions on the homeworks, the papers and the final exam. Questions in the papers and exams might include the following: “Critically examine Nozick’s justification of private property”; “Critically evaluate Rousseau’s explanation for the origins of social inequality.”
 
 
Student Learning Outcome: By the end of the course, students will be able to reconstruct the arguments offered by the philosophers we study in this course.
Relation of Course Specific Learning Outcome to GEP: By analyzing and assessing the arguments of the philosophers we study in this course, students will become aware of how interpretation is a critical form of knowing.
 
 
Essay questions on the homeworks, the papers and the final exam. Sample homework questions might include: “Why does Hobbes think that the state of nature leads to war?”; “Why does Rawls think that parties in the original position would choose a principle of equal basic liberties?”
 
 
Student Learning Outcome: By the end of the course, students will be able to produce their own philosophical arguments about such fundamental goods as liberty, equality, justice, and democracy.
Relation of Course Specific Learning Outcome to GEP: By producing their own philosophical arguments about such fundamental goods as liberty, equality, justice, and democracy, students will make academic arguments about the human experience using reasons.
 
 
Assessment: Essay questions on the homeworks, the papers and the final exam. Questions in the papers and exams might include the following: “Is alienation unavoidable?”, “Is Berlin right to repudiate positive liberty?”
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
NA
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
NA
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
Prerequisite: one PHI course [no change]
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
None
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
Wendy Brown Undoing the Demos (Zone, 2015) $29.95 new
Thomas Hobbes Leviathan (Penguin, 1982) $12.00 new
Rahel Jaeggi Alienation (Columbia, 2014) $35.00 new
John Locke Second Treatise of Government (Hackett, 1980) $9.00 new
Jean-Jacques Rousseau Discourse on Inequality (Oxford, 2009) $9.95 new
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
syllabus attached
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
none
College(s)Contact NameStatement Summary
College of Humanities and Social SciencesSteven Greene"... we all agree that PHI 309 _should_ be covering pre-20th century political philosophers." email message to P&RS, 9/30/2015
No additional resources are needed as this is a standard part of the instructor's responsibilities and the change involves only a revision in content.

syllabus attached; and see above on GEP


Student Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will be able to relate important philosophical accounts of such fundamental goods as liberty, equality, justice, and democracy to the human experience.


By the end of the course, students will be able to reconstruct the arguments offered by the philosophers we study in this course. 


By the end of the course, students will be able to produce their own philosophical arguments about such fundamental goods as liberty, equality, justice, and democracy.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Homework20%24 homework assignments on assigned readings, graded credit/no credit; for each "no credit" 0.83% is subtracted from 20%
Written Assignment10%Two reading assignments asking the same kinds of questions as regular homework assignments, but each be graded out of 5%.
Short Paper35%Two papers each 1,300 words long, exclusive of any bibliography and footnotes
Final Exam30%take home essay exam
Attendance5%Attendance at the lectures is mandatory. Points for attendance are allocated as follows: 0-2 unexcused absences: 5%; 3-4 unexcused absences: 4%; 5 unexcused absences: 3%; 6 unexcused absences: 2%; 7 unexcused absences: 1%; more than 7 unexcused absences: 0%.
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Plato: analogy between the soul and the polis0.5 weeksExcerpts from Plato’s Republic
Aristotle: The good life, the polis and natural inequality1 weekAristotle, Nicomachean Ethics, book one; Politics, excerpts from book one and book three
The Levellers: Radical political egalitarianism0.5 weekJohn Lilburne, “The freeman’s freedom vindicated”
Hobbes' Political Philosophy1.5 weeksHobbes, Leviathan
Locke's Political Philosophy1 weekLocke, Second Treatise of Government
Rousseau's Political Philosophy2 weeksRousseau, Discourse on Inequality; Frederick Neuhouser “Freedom, Dependence and the General Will”
Kant: Political society and the social contract0.5 weeksKant “On the Common Saying: That May be Correct in Theory”
Berlin: Negative and positive liberty0.5 weeksIsaiah Berlin “Two Concepts of Liberty”
Dworkin: Liberalism and the good0.5 weeksRonald Dworkin “Liberalism” from A Matter of Principle
MacIntyre: The priority of the good 0.5 weeksAlastair MacIntyre “The Privatization of Good”
Mill: Liberalism, the harm principle and individuality0.5 weeksJ. S. Mill “Introductory” and “Of Individuality” both excerpted from On Liberty
Rawls: The original position and liberty1 weekJohn Rawls “The Basic Liberties and their Priority”
Sandel: A critique of liberalism0.5 weeksMichael Sandel “The Procedural Republic and the Unencumbered Self” from Communitarianism and Individualism
Jaeggi on alienation2 weeksJaeggi, Alienation
Nozick: Libertarianism and justice1 weekRobert Nozick “Distributive Justice”
Brown: Neoliberalism1.5 weeksBrown, Undoing the Demos
Final Exam1 weekReview

Key: 4395